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Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com has commented on (386) products.

Bright Coin Moon by Kirsten Lopresti
Bright Coin Moon

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, November 12, 2014

Lindsey and her mother are barely eking by, telling fortunes in a small Oregon town. But Lindsey is unmoored when their home mysteriously burns down and her mom whisks them off to California so they can get rich telling fortunes for stars.

Lindsey desperately wants to pursue her dream of going to college and becoming an astronomer, but she’s not sure her mother will survive her leaving. Also, she finds herself attracted to the boy next door, but she’s not sure how much she can trust him to keep her secrets. Ultimately, Lindsey must decide how to transition from her current reality to the future she wants.

Bright Coin Moon by Kirsten Lopresti looks at the influence parents can have on helping their children develop a moral compass…or not. Lindsey knows that her mom runs scams to bilk people out of money, yet she feels it’s necessary for their survival. The web of lies they build around themselves is hard to maintain. Even the other people they collaborate with in their deceptions can’t be trusted.

While I would have liked to see Lindsey struggle more deeply with the ethical and moral issues raised in the book, Bright Coin Moon provides an interesting story for mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 14 and up to have their own discussions about getting by regardless of who you hurt with your actions.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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Glory O'Brien's History of the Future by A. S. King
Glory O'Brien's History of the Future

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, November 11, 2014

On the cusp of graduating from high school, Glory O’Brien is in the midst of a crisis that only she knows about. Her mother committed suicide when she was four, and Glory worries that even though she doesn’t feel depressed about her future, somehow she is destined to follow in her mom’s footsteps. She’s having a hard time communicating with her best friend, who mostly wants to talk about herself anyway. She’s frustrated that no one really talks about what happened with her mom, and everyone expects her to move on.

Then one day Glory can see the past and future of everyone she looks at. The future looks bleak, with a second Civil War started in the U.S., and the rights of women curtailed. As she searches for herself in those future visions, she finds a way to move forward in the present.

Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future by A.S. King explores the pressure teens feel to have things figured out for themselves by the time they finish high school. Glory’s situation is complicated by the tragedy in her family and the fact that she doesn’t feel like she can talk about it. The magical realism of Glory’s visions of the future add another layer to her confusion and the pressure to get things right in the present.

As in her other books, author A.S. King is not deterred from taking on big issues: how suicide affects family members, society’s expectations for women, and sexual activity among teens. Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future can inspire thoughtful conversations about those issues and more among book club members aged 16 and over.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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Glory O'Brien's History of the Future by A. S. King
Glory O'Brien's History of the Future

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, November 11, 2014

On the cusp of graduating from high school, Glory O’Brien is in the midst of a crisis that only she knows about. Her mother committed suicide when she was four, and Glory worries that even though she doesn’t feel depressed about her future, somehow she is destined to follow in her mom’s footsteps. She’s having a hard time communicating with her best friend, who mostly wants to talk about herself anyway. She’s frustrated that no one really talks about what happened with her mom, and everyone expects her to move on.

Then one day Glory can see the past and future of everyone she looks at. The future looks bleak, with a second Civil War started in the U.S., and the rights of women curtailed. As she searches for herself in those future visions, she finds a way to move forward in the present.

Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future by A.S. King explores the pressure teens feel to have things figured out for themselves by the time they finish high school. Glory’s situation is complicated by the tragedy in her family and the fact that she doesn’t feel like she can talk about it. The magical realism of Glory’s visions of the future add another layer to her confusion and the pressure to get things right in the present.

As in her other books, author A.S. King is not deterred from taking on big issues: how suicide affects family members, society’s expectations for women, and sexual activity among teens. Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future can inspire thoughtful conversations about those issues and more among book club members aged 16 and over.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir by Liz Prince
Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, November 11, 2014

Growing up, Liz Prince was considered a tomboy. She liked to wear boys’ clothes, keep her hair short, and she was the only girl in her local Little League. Liz was just behaving in a way that felt right for her, but other kids didn’t like the fact that she didn’t fit into her expected gender role, which meant she was bullied. While she avoided doing “girly things,” she was also attracted to boys, a combination that didn’t often work out for her. With the support of a core group of friends, and her discovery of comics and zines that speak to her creativity, she forges a path of acceptance for herself.

Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir is Prince’s story about her experiences growing up. It shows that even with supportive parents and close friends, life can be difficult when you don’t conform to people’s expectations. Prince reveals her struggle with candor, and I expect that many readers who feel like they don’t “fit in” in some way will relate to her experiences. Her illustrations create scenes from playgrounds and in classrooms that do a great job of capturing how she thought and acted through the year.

Tomboy should be a great way to start a conversation about gender expectations, both for boys and girls (Prince’s younger brother was bullied for growing his hair long like a girl’s). I highly recommend it for book clubs with members aged 14 and up.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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The God of Sno Cone Blue by Marcia Coffey Turnquist

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, November 11, 2014

When Grace thinks back on her childhood, she sees it split into two: the time before her mother got sick and died, and the time after, when the letters her mother wrote to her started to arrive. Before, even though she was the child of a preacher and felt the pressure of being considered a “goody two shoes,” Grace felt like she knew what to expect of the world. After, her mother’s letters reveal stories from her own teen years and the events that set her on a path to become a preacher’s wife. The letters reveal things Grace never expected to know about her mother, information that sends her on a journey of discovery that will change the rest of her life.

The God of Sno Cone Blue by Marcia Coffey Turnquist is a story of mothers and daughters and the profound impact they can have��"both good and bad��"on each other’s lives. Grace’s mother, Sharon, tells stories of her own mother, a woman with no tenderness to show her children. Astrid is a mother to be feared rather than loved, and Sharon vows to be different. Dying young, she wants her daughter to truly know her, so she writes the letters and directs that they be delivered over time, as Grace turns from a pre-teen to a teen.

The God of Sno Cone Blue brings up many issues to discuss in book clubs with teens aged older than 15 or those with adults only. Why does grief often make people question their religious faith? How does knowing someone with physical or mental challenges change peoples’ perspective of others who are challenged? How important is the image we create of ourselves and the person we believe ourselves to be? What defines a family?

I purchased my copy of this book from the author.
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