25 Women to Read Before You Die
 
 

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Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com has commented on (413) products.

Three Day Summer by Sarvenaz Tash
Three Day Summer

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, July 24, 2015

It’s 1969 and the biggest concert of the summer is about to take place at a farm in Bethel, near Woodstock, New York. Seventeen-year-old Cora lives on a nearby farm and volunteers as a candy-striper in the medical tent. She’s still recovering from a breakup with Ned, a boy everyone seems to love but who no longer loves her. Eighteen-year-old Michael drives to the festival with friends from his home near Boston. Michael loves music, but he’s unsure about what else to do with his life now that he’s graduated from high school. When the two meet, the relaxed attitude of festival-goers, the headiness of hearing some of the best performers in the world, and a dash of daring lead them to share secrets and more as they get to know each other.

Three Day Summer by Sarvenaz Tash is the story of two teens grappling with major decisions of what to do with their lives. They know the expectations others have of them, but the times are turbulent. Cora knows that roles for women are changing, but she’s not sure if she dares to push back against her traditional father or others in town. Michael knows he may be drafted to serve in Vietnam, but he doesn’t feel strongly about it one way or another. He feels he’s drifting along without anything to look forward to. Freed for a few days from having to worry about their future gives both of them more clarity about what they really want.

As might be expected with a story that takes place at Woodstock, drug use and some sexuality are part of it. Mature teens and book groups with members aged 15 and up should find a lot to discuss in Three Day Summer. You may also be interested in listening to the playlist the author has gathered at her website.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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The Revelation of Louisa May by Michaela Maccoll
The Revelation of Louisa May

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, July 24, 2015

Add another great historical fiction novel to the growing list from Michaela MacColl focusing on famous women. In The Revelation of Louisa May, MacColl imagines a mystery for Louisa May Alcott to solve, and in the process brings to life the town of Concord, Massachusetts, where she lived for much of her life.

As in real life, Alcott is friends and neighbors with some of the greatest writers of their time: Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. It’s known that the Alcotts were abolitionists active with the Underground Railroad, and MacColl creates a story that involves a runaway slave, a slave catcher, a list of unsavory characters, and quite a few people with secrets to hide.

Louisa appears in the novel as a spunky 17 year old who knows that like her idols Thoreau and Emerson, she wants to be writer. In a family that is often short on money, she also knows she wants her writing to support her and those she loves. Because women of her time were expected to marry, stay home, and manage the children and the household, she has to reject tradition to pursue what she wants. Louisa grapples with conflicting emotions as she tries to work out the mystery that develops during the story.

The Revelation of Louisa May is fun and fast-paced and provides a bit of insight into the historical life of the beloved writer of many stories, Little Women being the best known. I highly recommend it for mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 12 and up.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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Alchemy's Daughter by Mary A Osborne
Alchemy's Daughter

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, July 24, 2015

Life for women in medieval Italy did not offer many choices, and girls who didn’t conform were looked upon with suspicion. So when seventeen-year-old Santina leaves her comfortable life to live with and learn from the local midwife, some say witchcraft influenced her. But Santina wishes to follow her heart, which means rejecting marriage to a local merchant. After the women perform a risky medical procedure, their own lives are in danger. Santina will have to delve deep inside herself to find a way out.

Alchemy’s Daughter by Mary A. Osborne is great historical fiction for teens. Covering topics such as the roles of women, practices of midwifery, the place for love and romance, as well as the plague of 1348, it provides a fascinating glimpse into the times. Santina is smart and strong-strong-willed and curious��"traits that were not widely valued in a time when women were supposed to follow the wishes first of their fathers and then of their husbands. Young readers will appreciate her tenacity and her creativity in forging a life for herself.

I recommend Alchemy’s Daughter for any teen and members of mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 12 and up.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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Saturday Cooking Club #1: Kitchen Chaos by Deborah A Levine
Saturday Cooking Club #1: Kitchen Chaos

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, July 24, 2015

Liza and Frankie are a team, best friends since forever and great partners on school projects too. But when their 7th grade social studies teacher assigns a major project for teams of three, they have to expand their ranks to include a new girl, Lillian. Liza takes to her right away, but Frankie is not so sure she wants to embrace Lillian as a new friend as well as a teammate.

The project they create��"exploring the history of U.S. immigrants through food��"gets them to sign up for a cooking class with their moms and discover things about eating, and themselves, they didn’t know before.

The Saturday Cooking Club: Kitchen Chaos, is the first of a new series by Deborah A. Levine and JillEllyn Riley. Told in alternating chapters from the perspective of each girl, the book gives insight into challenges that arise in different family situations. For instance, Frankie’s family life includes several brothers, a firefighter dad that cooks, and a mom who is prone to kitchen disasters. Liza’s single-mother mom is often too harried to put a meal on the table, and Liza often ends up heating up food or ordering take out. Lillian’s family seems perfect on the outside, but she feels pressure to conform in ways that don’t fit her personality. Each girl learns to recognize the challenges as well as the benefits of living within her own unique family.

I highly recommend Kitchen Chaos for mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 9 and up. Issues to discuss include making new friends while keeping old ones, mother-daughter relationships, personality in the kitchen, and family backgrounds. Don’t be surprised if you’re inspired to explore more of the foods mentioned in the book and create your own feast for book club.

The authors provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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When Audrey Met Alice by Rebecca Behrens
When Audrey Met Alice

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, July 24, 2015

First Daughter Audrey Rhodes is having difficulty adjusting to life in the White House. She left her friends behind in Minnesota, making new ones at her new school is not easy with a Secret Service agent in tow, and delivery pizza is always cold. Mostly, she’s lonely as her mom, the president, is always working and her dad, a researcher with an onsite lab, is never around either. So when she finds a diary hidden away by Alice Roosevelt, she’s intrigued by the experiences of that long ago First Daughter. Soon, she finds inspiration from Alice’s capers.

When Audrey Met Alice by Rebecca Behrens is a cute story about a modern teen who finds solace in the words of a contemporary from more than a century before. It’s a good contrast between realities of life in the two different eras. It’s also fun to read about the antics of Alice Roosevelt, well known in her time for pushing boundaries and getting into trouble.

Audrey discovers that taking refuge in the story of a life from the past is fine, but ultimately it doesn’t take the place of communicating with the people important to you in the present. I recommend When Audrey Met Alice for mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 9 and up.

The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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