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Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
  1. $16.07 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

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Customer Comments

Amy Cookson has commented on (5) products.

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan
When She Woke

Amy Cookson, January 2, 2013

Amazing. To call this A Handmaid's Tale meets The Scarlet Letter is accurate, but does not do it justice. I read this book twice this year; it is by far my favorite read of 2012. I appreciate the feminism, the reproductive rights, the world-building, and our protagonist's personal journey. For me, the novel plays on two levels: the larger political/cultural examination of Chroming (dying the skin color of criminals based upon their crime) and reproductive rights, and one woman's awakening to her potential. I suspect it will be one of those novels that speaks to me in a different way each time I read it, like Reading Lolita in Tehran. Remarkable and highly recommended.
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Istanbul Passage by Joseph Kanon
Istanbul Passage

Amy Cookson, August 11, 2012

I loved the setting of post Wold War II Istanbul. Kanon's newest novel furthers my resolve to read more book set in Istanbul, and learn more about the city itself. It's hard to follow The Good German (one of my favorite novels), and Istanbul Passage lacks the emotional heft and moral dilemmas of Kannon's previous post war novel. He touches upon the same themes, but the characters, their conundrums and the plot in Istanbul cannot compare to Berlin. Still, though Istanbul Passage is not as meaty as The Good German, it's still a pretty good yarn, and for me, well worth it to be in 1945 Istanbul for a few hours.
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Istanbul Passage by Joseph Kanon
Istanbul Passage

Amy Cookson, August 11, 2012

I loved the setting of post Wold War II Istanbul. Kanon's newest novel furthers my resolve to read more book set in Istanbul, and learn more about the city itself. It's hard to follow The Good German (one of my favorite novels), and Istanbul Passage lacks the emotional heft and moral dilemmas of Kannon's previous post war novel. He touches upon the same themes, but the characters, their conundrums and the plot in Istanbul cannot compare to Berlin. Still, though Istanbul Passage is not as meaty as The Good German, it's still a pretty good yarn, and for me, well worth it to be in 1945 Istanbul for a few hours.
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All Roads Lead to Austen: A Year-Long Journey with Jane by Amy Elizabeth Smith
All Roads Lead to Austen: A Year-Long Journey with Jane

Amy Cookson, August 6, 2012

"Thank god for feisty women, rich or poor. Thank god for anyone who’ll fight for the right to sit down with a good book��"and then, the right to sit down with some good friends and that good book (164)."

English professor Amy Elizabeth Smith takes a sabbatical to spend the year traveling to six countries in Latin America, holding a book group (in Spanish) to discuss one of Jane Austen’s novels in each country she visits. In each country, Smith followed the same basic blueprint: settle in, get recommendations for books written by native authors, buy lots of books, provide a little history of country and chronicle major tourist excursions, hold book discussion. In short, if my Spanish were better, she’s living a dream of mine.

One delight I must mention: Each chapter opens with a beautiful illustration of a Regency style woman in the country Smith is currently visiting. If they were available as bookplates, I would buy them. Instead, I'll settle for the charming travelogue itself.
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Lizz Free or Die: Essays by Lizz Winstead
Lizz Free or Die: Essays

Amy Cookson, August 4, 2012

This is a great quick read. I hesitate to call it a beach read, as I would have likely received strange glances and possible medical attention from snorting with laughter as I read Winstead’s essays, or “messays” as she calls them. “Two Dogs and a Cup,” about adopting a dog from the local shelter, had me laughing so hard I couldn’t hold on to the book.

Winstead is a smart, funny, feminist, and political satirist. I love her; she’s my favorite. Check her out.
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