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Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lisa Howorth: IMG So Many Books, So Many Writers



I'm not a bookseller, but I'm married to one, and Square Books is a family. And we all know about families and how hard it is to disassociate... Continue »

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Customer Comments

Booklover46 has commented on (2) products.

Hannibal Rising: A Novel by Thomas Harris
Hannibal Rising: A Novel

Booklover46, January 14, 2007

I do see why people did not find this book as good as the "Red Dragon" and "Silence of the Lambs", however I found the links between Hannibal's past and future interesting.

It is very easy to miss some of the fine points in this book, much as I did on my first reading of "Hannibal" that caused me to go back and read it a second time. I just had to figure out what, Harris, was getting at and on second reading things fell into place.

Here we see Hannibal as an extremely brilliant child with a deep attachment to both his family and those who were part of their household. What I registered most was his love for family and after their death, having only his sister, his utter devotion to her. His depth of feeling, his devotion, compassion and empathy do not signal the signes of a sociopath that so often show in the childhood of such people. No, Hannibal did not start out as a sociopath, he was a child with deep attachments, deep emotions and considerable courage. A child willing to die in place of his sister does not fit the profile of a sociopath; yet that is the label placed upon him throughout these books.

When he sets out to kill those murderous cannibals who ate children, ate his sister, and operated throughout as pure sociopath's with no conscience, it enlightens what he becomes. My next realization was when one of those responsible tells him that he too ate his sister to survive, he is torn apart, and his mind simply breaks along with his heart. Hearing that man tell him that the broth they fed him was made from his sister's body would be enough to drive an adult into madness.

When we see him as an adult other things begin to make sense. His time watching those people moving through the showing of torture instruments at the exhibition in ?Hannibal? puzzled me at first reading. Puzzled me until I realized he was watching the watchers, his interest had nothing to do with the exhibit and everything to do with people who could see these things, be excited by them and walk out sexually stimulated.

From Hannibal Rising I understand better than ever his fixation on the aspects of human behavior that he detests. His gentler attitude toward women becomes clearer when one realizes how important his stepmother was in those formative years.

Perhaps one needs to want to understand how he became what he became. Maybe, I find myself wondering if all that genius used for good in many cases, could be as easily used for evil. I cannot help but wonder if there will be a sequel where we discover if, as he realizes his desire to alter the past and bring his sister back to life, can be let go of. If he can let go of that, then were will his genius take him, where will it take Clarisse on this strange journey.

There is no doubting that true madness makes up an element of Hannibal however covered by the mask of sanity. If the insanity leaves, what then remains, what could possibly take place inside this man? These books take more close attention than most fiction or you pass right over the important things dragged along by the more obvious and bloody ones.
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(11 of 18 readers found this comment helpful)



The Evolutionary Mind: Conversations on Science, Imagination and Spirit by Rupert Sheldrake and Ralph Abraham and Terence McKenna
The Evolutionary Mind: Conversations on Science, Imagination and Spirit

Booklover46, December 31, 2006




The Evolutionary Mind: Conversations on Science, Imagination and Spirit
By, Rupert Sheldrake



I was fortunate enough to stumble upon one of the televised programs between these three men. While I saw only part of the first, I managed to watch the whole of another and they were intriguing.

Their ideas, so complex and out of the usual range of our everyday thinking, were presented with such clarity of thought as to make most of their theories understandable for people with little knowledge of their respective fields.

The review captured this very well and hopefully will attract others to read this book. It is, especially in this period of time when many of us are filled with confusion and anxiety, a light for those who can see it. Some have the comfort of their religion but many do not and these men's approach is, for me, emotionally as well as intellectually a brighter hope than the majority of religions? offer.

Not believing, not wanting to believe, that anyone will be abandoned or left in darkness their view holds out hope for an evolutionary process that may take humanity to that higher level that is often spoken of as heaven, or the second coming. It is, to me, heart breaking to think of some human beings forever lost.

Their ideas, so complex and out of the usual range of everyday thinking, were presented with clarity of thought making most of their theories understandable for people with little knowledge of their fields.

This review captured the spirit of their talk well and hopefully will attract others to read this book. It is, especially in this period of time when many of us are filled with confusion and anxiety, a light for those who can see it. Some have the comfort of their religion but many do not and their approach is, for me, emotionally as well as intellectually a brighter hope than what the majority of religions? offer.

Having no claim to any specialty I have often thought over my 60 years that the mind, rather than space, is our true final frontier. It seemed to me that the curiosity and search into space is another component of our human curiosity, the search for something tying humanity together in new ways. It never occurred to me to think of it as part of an intersection between various parts of the human mind and spirit.

After reading this review, I am grateful that I noticed and read it; it is a book I will want to read myself. For myself, I hope humanity may reach that pinnacle of consciousness and enlightenment without an Armageddon. Perhaps such an experience may be necessary for mankind to achieve the intersection leading to a new path for mankind and if that be so, it must be faced. Still, it would be better to reach it through that path of evolution from humanity itself rather than hinging upon a time of massive destruction. It is my hope that many, besides me, will be attracted to these fascinating concepts that hopefully foreshadow our future.

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(7 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)



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