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Customer Comments

Coni has commented on (25) products.

The 100 (100) by Kass Morgan
The 100 (100)

Coni, August 28, 2015

I found the premise of this book intriguing. Nuclear war has taken place on Earth and a colony of people have lived in spaceships orbiting Earth for 300 years while waiting for the radiation to calm down so they can repopulate. After some tests, scientists believe that the planet is safe, but who is willing to actually go test it out? The government decides to send 100 prisoners that were sentenced to die with bracelets attached to them that sends data back to the ship. If they can survive, then the rest of the population will follow.

For reasons that are not explained very well, most of the ship’s prisoners are young adults. If anyone slips up past the age of 18, they are sentenced to prison and more often than not, death. It seems odd that a ship with limited resources would keep killing all the young people instead of possibly the old and sick. Maybe that is explained in more details in future novels, but not in this one and that is the main problem. This is a young adult novel that follows in the recent trend of writing everything in a trilogy format. The way this very slim book was written, I sense that it was a normal-length novel that was cut up into three of them to sell more copies. It feels incomplete, especially since the entire book is explaining some of the backstory and getting the kids down to Earth. Barely anything happens though and then the book ends on a cliffhanger. While I have no problems with books ending on a cliffhanger, there still has to be some semblance of a story. I appreciate a middle, beginning and end. This is all beginning with a hint at a middle coming up. In other trilogies or even book series with more than three novels, something still happens in each book. They can stand on their own. This book cannot stand on its own because there is no main plot.

I might have forgiven some of this but the writing was very poor. Each chapter concentrates on one of four main characters, none who are fully developed as characters, but instead are archetypes. Each chapter covers a tiny bit about what is happening in the present before it goes to some flashback in the past. I love when books tell the history of what has happened to characters, but when a book spends so much time in flashbacks and no time in the present, I feel like it could have been arranged in a better manner. The way it is organized doesn’t work. If there is a point where you might be interested in what is happening in the past or present, it doesn’t last long before the chapter ends and it is time to move on. The chapters are extremely short and so much more could have been expanded on that wasn’t, which leads me back to the poor writing. I have defended some popular young adult novels that are extremely well written, but this is not one of them.

I would not recommend this book, and I know it was written in a way that would make you want to continue reading the series to wrap up the cliffhanger, but I was completely annoyed by nothing happening the entire time. I will not be reading any more.
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Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
Ready Player One

Coni, June 30, 2015

I found this book a quick read and highly entertaining. I think it would be for anyone that grew up in the 1980s and loves everything pop culture from that decade including the music, movies, video games, D&D, arcade games, and more. It will also appeal to anyone that is really into gaming from roleplaying games to online games to anything close to virtual reality. I am guessing the only people that will not find anything entertaining about this book are people that don’t fall into one of those categories. This book does not offer you anything.

It isn’t the best written book. The characters are not the most well written, but this is a book about moving the plot forward and it does that very well. It does not stop and ponder too hard on anything because there is another puzzle to solve! It is also the first book by Ernest Cline so I can only imagine his writing can improve, but I do appreciate his adoration for the 1980s. It is like a love letter to that decade and it’s a really fun one.
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The Casual Vacancy (Large Print) by J.K. Rowling
The Casual Vacancy (Large Print)

Coni, June 21, 2015

I have read the Harry Potter series and enjoyed it greatly. It has been years since I read them so I don’t remember Rowling’s writing style to compare it her style in The Casual Vacancy. I know this book disappointed many people, but did not read any reviews beforehand. I really enjoyed it while I read it, but I am wondering if the problem people had with it was this was not a plot-driven book. It is really about the characters in the town. Some small things happen and it doesn’t have the happiest of endings, but it was really a book about the characters, class disparity, and hypocrisy.

It is a slow build and a long novel. There are a lot of characters, but I thought it was well done going through the nice, peaceful village that is dealing with a council member dying and having to fill his seat on the council. Each family, including most parents and some teenagers, is introduced with all their problems. It seems no one is happy, even though some try to hide it.

The big plot point involves a community building that sits on the edge of village where poorer people live. They use that building for a variety of reasons, but most of the village people would rather not look or deal with any of the poorer people. The village people want to turn that building into something that the poorer people would not use so they can give them no reason to come into the village. I found it fascinating that everyone had secrets. People had serious problems, like drug use. Some were trying to be good, but failing. There were petty fights and serious arguments.

I found it to be very realistic, including the ending where you really wish it would wrap up one way, but since real life does not always go the way you wish it would, it made sense in a way. I really liked that it was realistic and I do love it when novels dig into the fake life that people make for themselves in the suburbs of America or in the quaint villages of England. One character in the book is obsessed with people being “authentic” and many do have that problem.
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The Casual Vacancy (Large Print) by J.K. Rowling
The Casual Vacancy (Large Print)

Coni, June 21, 2015

I have read the Harry Potter series and enjoyed it greatly. It has been years since I read them so I don’t remember Rowling’s writing style to compare it her style in The Casual Vacancy. I know this book disappointed many people, but did not read any reviews beforehand. I really enjoyed it while I read it, but I am wondering if the problem people had with it was this was not a plot-driven book. It is really about the characters in the town. Some small things happen and it doesn’t have the happiest of endings, but it was really a book about the characters, class disparity, and hypocrisy.

It is a slow build and a long novel. There are a lot of characters, but I thought it was well done going through the nice, peaceful village that is dealing with a council member dying and having to fill his seat on the council. Each family, including most parents and some teenagers, is introduced with all their problems. It seems no one is happy, even though some try to hide it.

The big plot point involves a community building that sits on the edge of village where poorer people live. They use that building for a variety of reasons, but most of the village people would rather not look or deal with any of the poorer people. The village people want to turn that building into something that the poorer people would not use so they can give them no reason to come into the village. I found it fascinating that everyone had secrets. People had serious problems, like drug use. Some were trying to be good, but failing. There were petty fights and serious arguments.

I found it to be very realistic, including the ending where you really wish it would wrap up one way, but since real life does not always go the way you wish it would, it made sense in a way. I really liked that it was realistic and I do love it when novels dig into the fake life that people make for themselves in the suburbs of America or in the quaint villages of England. One character in the book is obsessed with people being “authentic” and many do have that problem.
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Dark Places by Gillian Flynn
Dark Places

Coni, May 12, 2015

Whenever I thought I would stop and take a break from reading, I decided to just read one more chapter. Next thing I knew, I had read more than half the book in one sitting. I only stopped since it was the middle of the night and I really needed to get some sleep. The next time I picked up the book a couple days later, I finished it. I did the same thing with Gillian Flynn’s first book, Sharp Objects. I read it really quickly. I purchased this book as soon as it came out, but didn’t get around to reading it until after I tore through Flynn’s third book Gone Girl. Flynn writes really twisted, dark stories that I have a hard time putting down once I start reading them. I enjoyed Sharp Objects, but could tell where it was going about halfway through the book. Gone Girl threw me for a total loop and I did not completely expect that was heading where it went while reading it. I can see with this book, which was her second one written that her writing was improving. I did enjoy Gone Girl best out of the three I have read by Flynn, but really enjoyed Dark Places.

When I started reading this book, I had to know what happened with the murders so I was more interested in the chapters that were either from Patty or Ben’s point of view since it was what was going on with either of them the day before all the murders took place. The present day chapters were a bit sad because Libby had not adjusted well to adult life after living through that horrifying event and losing her entire family. Later on though, I found it really interesting that Libby started to doubt her own memories when she was faced with bits of evidence or heard conflicting stories from people she was talking to from her past. That’s when I reached a point of no return with this book and I couldn’t stop.

I could not completely tell where this story was heading. Even when I had a vague idea, there were still a lot of surprises. It was frustratingly realistic about how the entire town would feed into gossip and rumors about what they thought happened with the family and how it affected the trial and Libby’s life after the murders. Also, the murders and the family affected so many people still living besides just Libby. That’s why the current day part of the book became more interesting as it went on, even though what I guessed had happened with the actual murders still surprised me, which is great. I love it when I can’t guess what is going on, but still having enough clues to try to figure it out while I read anyway.
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