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CoyoteNW has commented on (5) products.

Brilliant Orange by David Winner
Brilliant Orange

CoyoteNW, January 15, 2010

I had my doubts when I picked this one up, but I'm so very glad I did. A historical and anthropological review of all things Dutch and how it has influenced their football, and vice-versa. It was fascinating learning more about the origins of Dutch football tactics (creative use of space) and why they always seem to choke in the big games. ;)
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Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind #02 by Hayao Miyazaki
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind #02

CoyoteNW, January 15, 2010

This was the first and only "graphic novel" I've ever read. I took my time reading the entire seven volume series in about three weeks time, and upon completing it I felt as if I had just returned home from a long journey. The artwork and storyline are both incredible...an epic masterpiece.
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Demian (Perennial Classics) by Hermann Hesse
Demian (Perennial Classics)

CoyoteNW, January 14, 2010

A brilliant argument on why the world should not be viewed as black/white or good/evil. I was floored that this 1917 coming-of-age story holds up so well...
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(5 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)



Rogue Male (New York Review Books Classics) by Geoffrey Household
Rogue Male (New York Review Books Classics)

CoyoteNW, January 14, 2010

A can't quite put my finger on what it was that caused me to pick up this book in the first place. It may have been the beautiful expressionist depiction of a winter forest on the cover, or perhaps the use of red in conjunction with shades of white and black. I think it may been the title in blood red text that compelled me to give this book a gander.

The brief synopsis on the back cover described an interesting yet not profound plot line. I think the quip which mentioned Household (whom I never heard of before) as the "bastard child of Stevenson and Conrad" peaked my interest. The last phrase "an exploration of the lure of violence, the psychology of survivalism, and the call of the wild" finally convinced me to bring it home.

Once I started reading I quickly noticed that there were no chapters, and only two brief "interludes" where the text stopped before the bottom of a page. Whether this format was intentional or not, I do not know, but I have to admit this was one of the most addictive books I've ever read. The lack of chapters may have played into this, but I was generally enthralled with the content.

As someone who has given some thought on how to best "disappear" from society, I found this book to be incredibly realistic and insightful. Granted, this story took place in the 1930's when surveillance technology was far more limited than present day, but I could personally relate to several of his ideas and tactics.

I found Rogue Male to be incredibly unpredictable, highly addictive, and immensely enjoyable. Recommended.
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(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)



Endgame, Volume 1: The Problem of Civilization by Derrick Jensen
Endgame, Volume 1: The Problem of Civilization

CoyoteNW, January 14, 2010

Endgame can be a challenging read due to it's sheer emotional and informational density, but don't let that deter you. Jensen's message is as important as any you'll ever find in non-fiction literature.
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)



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