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Currer1013 has commented on (6) products.

Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think by Brian Wansink
Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think

Currer1013, March 22, 2007

This book is nothing new. It focuses on "the obesity epidemic," a fear-mongering term that's frequently bandied about (and usually accompanied by photographs of fat bellied, headless torsos). Mostly, it's bad social science. It confuses correlation with causality, a freshman sociological mistake. Yes, there is a correlation between heart disease and obesity, but there's also a correlation between heart disease and living in an industrialized nation, your race, gender, etc. In fact, there is a higher correlation between heart disease and being UNDERweight than being overweight.

Wansink's book is another pseudo-sociology that Puritanizes food and weight and labels fat people as lazy, food obsessed, stupid slobs, just like every other stereotypical portrayal. For a better analysis, see Barry Glassner's The Gospel of Food or Paul Campos's The Obesity Myth.
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(20 of 48 readers found this comment helpful)



The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell
The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

Currer1013, February 26, 2007

Ever wonder how something becomes "hip"? Do you look at other people's shoes and think, "Good grief. How did that become 'the thing'?" "The Tipping Point" explains how something as mundane and innocuous as Hush Puppies can become the hippest thing to own, how a regularly occuring phenomena like school violence can become A Social Problem, and how to make something hip. Read it to refute faulty theories at parties, or to come up with some theories of your own on how things become popular--or infamous.
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(48 of 98 readers found this comment helpful)



Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore
Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal

Currer1013, February 26, 2007

I've given a copy of this book to nearly everyone I know, including as a confirmation gift for a young friend. "Lamb" manages to enduce both tears of laughter and tears of reverential emotion, frequently on the same page. If you ever wondered what happened to Jesus in "the missing years," this book will give you a story that is funny, touching, and teaching.
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(36 of 75 readers found this comment helpful)



Through a Glass Darkly by Karleen Koen
Through a Glass Darkly

Currer1013, February 26, 2007

Generally, I'm an optimist when it comes to books. I picked this one up on a whim, excited by the promise of a book "infused with intrigue." If the blurb is true, then this is the weakest infusion I've ever seen.

"Through A Glass Darkly" takes place during the reign of King George I of Great Britain, a court filled with intrigue and infinite possibilities for historical fiction. Unfortunately, the book falls short in several areas. The characters are perilously one-dimensional, and the ending of this book (part of a series) has so many out of character moments one wonders if the latter part of the book has anything to do with the beginning at all.

As historical fiction, the book also falls flat. Anachronisms abound--enough even to startle someone not familiar with the language and customs of early 1700s England. The "intrigue" is a poorly contrived, obvious plot device that reflects more modern mores than those appropriate to the reign of George I. If you're looking for intriguing historical fiction, I would suggest looking elsewhere. Overall, a great disappointment.
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(15 of 28 readers found this comment helpful)



Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography by Jean H Baker
Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography

Currer1013, December 29, 2006

Fantastic biography about one of the most maligned women in American history. Baker's writing makes for a quick read, and tidbits about Mary Todd Lincoln's interactions with other historical figures (such as Judah Benjamin) make it particularly interesting. Read for another look into Mary Todd Lincoln, or for a view of what it was like to be an eccentric woman in the public eye in the late 1800s.
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(15 of 35 readers found this comment helpful)



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