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Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »

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Customer Comments

Daoshi has commented on (2) products.

Looking Glass Wars by FRANK BEDDOR
Looking Glass Wars

Daoshi, February 21, 2007

Before I begin, I have to say that my first experience with Lewis Carroll’s influence wasn’t the best when I had nightmares over evil-grinning cats ripping my skin off and hatters that would boil me in their tea. (I suppose that means I had macabre imagination for a child.) That being said, I already had a bias about The Looking Glass War’s “Hatter Madigan” and “The Cat” characters before even reading about them.

Frank Beddor, however, shall cause no such nightmares to anyone. To assemble an appropriate book to suit all ages and tastes is nearly impossible. Yet, The Looking Glass Wars pulls it off well; it returns adolescent imagining powers as a literal form of energy while including the ever popular demand for “action fight scenes” and “childhood adoration.” Because of this, the book has reached popularity; like all popular books, there are always people that want everything to be all original and I, myself, prefer original things over trite, over-used themes. However, The Looking Glass Wars has a careful blend of both.

Nevertheless, this book might not be the best for all in which it requires an open mind and personal opinions.

The American McGee travesty of the Mad Hatter was rather repulsive. Upon hearing of Hatter Madigan, I expected another American grotesque, tragic remix of the classic at-maker. I was gladly proved wrong. Hatter Madigan has a wonderful character and he is very focused on his ambitions. We see Hatter’s personal goals rather easily but is haunted by his own daemons bestowed upon him as a command from Queen Genevieve Heart.

Now, Princess Alyss goes through scenarios that we all must go through such as when one speaks the truth yet all revile. Alyss’ powers elude her on Earth and thus, she shows courage in trying to reclaim it in Wonderland thirteen years later of everyone attempting to convince her that Wonderland does not exist and that her true name is Alice. Why doesn’t this girl go through an identity crisis or develop schizophrenia as a form of being haunted by her family’s death? It’s amazing how she pulls through! In addition, she is also courageous in a sense that she does not lash out on Queen Redd for her the dictator’s massacring of many people and Alyss certainly is not contained in a mental ward because of her beliefs of Wonderland. Alyss is also unselfish for the fact that she chooses to do what is best for all in both places, Wonderland and Earth.

Instead of giving us a “rip-off” cliff-hanger ending, we have a decent resolution to all the elements to encourage the readers to read the next two books of the fantasy trilogy.

I encourage all to read The Looking Glass Wars. Cheers!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 15 readers found this comment helpful)



The Looking Glass Wars (Looking Glass Wars) by Frank Beddor
The Looking Glass Wars (Looking Glass Wars)

Daoshi, February 21, 2007

Before I begin, I have to say that my first experience with Lewis Carroll’s influence wasn’t the best when I had nightmares over evil-grinning cats ripping my skin off and hatters that would boil me in their tea. (I suppose that means I had macabre imagination for a child.) That being said, I already had a bias about The Looking Glass War’s “Hatter Madigan” and “The Cat” characters before even reading about them.

Frank Beddor, however, shall cause no such nightmares to anyone. To assemble an appropriate book to suit all ages and tastes is nearly impossible. Yet, The Looking Glass Wars pulls it off well; it returns adolescent imagining powers as a literal form of energy while including the ever popular demand for “action fight scenes” and “childhood adoration.” Because of this, the book has reached popularity; like all popular books, there are always people that want everything to be all original and I, myself, prefer original things over trite, over-used themes. However, The Looking Glass Wars has a careful blend of both.

Nevertheless, this book might not be the best for all in which it requires an open mind and personal opinions.

The American McGee travesty of the Mad Hatter was rather repulsive. Upon hearing of Hatter Madigan, I expected another American grotesque, tragic remix of the classic at-maker. I was gladly proved wrong. Hatter Madigan has a wonderful character and he is very focused on his ambitions. We see Hatter’s personal goals rather easily but is haunted by his own daemons bestowed upon him as a command from Queen Genevieve Heart.

Now, Princess Alyss goes through scenarios that we all must go through such as when one speaks the truth yet all revile. Alyss’ powers elude her on Earth and thus, she shows courage in trying to reclaim it in Wonderland thirteen years later of everyone attempting to convince her that Wonderland does not exist and that her true name is Alice. Why doesn’t this girl go through an identity crisis or develop schizophrenia as a form of being haunted by her family’s death? It’s amazing how she pulls through! In addition, she is also courageous in a sense that she does not lash out on Queen Redd for her the dictator’s massacring of many people and Alyss certainly is not contained in a mental ward because of her beliefs of Wonderland. Alyss is also unselfish for the fact that she chooses to do what is best for all in both places, Wonderland and Earth.

Instead of giving us a “rip-off” cliff-hanger ending, we have a decent resolution to all the elements to encourage the readers to read the next two books of the fantasy trilogy.

I encourage all to read The Looking Glass Wars. Cheers!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(6 of 13 readers found this comment helpful)



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