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Customer Comments

Edward has commented on (36) products.

Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety by Daniel Smith
Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety

Edward, September 11, 2012

You can listen to a interview with the author podcast of this book in this week's New York Times Book Review.
The book itself is reassuring, that I am not alone. I frequently suffer from anxiety and sometimes support for this comes from the help of a good listener, a loving family member or friend, or in this case a good book. Oliver Sacks endorses this book. A much needed read in an age of anxiety. Being an introvert, I also frequently do not want to be around people, but would rather be with myself, alone and quiet. Oh, by the way, another good read about introversion and anxiety is Quiet; it just may be the ideal companion guide for this book. Thank you Mr.Smith, you have made a connection and you have made me smile. All I can hope one gains from reading taking my advise and reading it too, is that it will make them smile too.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)



Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer's Life by Michael Greenberg
Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer's Life

Edward, December 31, 2009

This gem proves to one that patience pays off. After years of rejection letters and hardships with writing, Greenburg is living proof that one must not give up on what one loves. Greenburg loves writing and his pain and hardships in the publishing world is inspiration for all who painstakingly live to write and write to live. Bravo!
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(4 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)



Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life (P.S.) by Barbara Kingsolver and Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life (P.S.)

Edward, April 17, 2009

We are converting our backyard into a communal garden. My wife whom only recently began eating vegetables that weren't canned supports this venture. You are what you eat. We should all support locally grown producers and farms. I support the Peoples Market. Vive le local farm!
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(7 of 15 readers found this comment helpful)



The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
The White Tiger

Edward, February 20, 2009

It is the Crime and Punishment of this century.
Get a taste of India and the modern world.
Why does the poor want to be fat and the rich want to be thin?
Why do white people wish to be tanned and dark skinned people wish to be lightened?
Find out the answers to these questions and more when you get a taste of the "future of the modern novel".
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(11 of 22 readers found this comment helpful)



The Adventures of Pinocchio (New York Review Books) by Carlo Collodi
The Adventures of Pinocchio (New York Review Books)

Edward, January 9, 2009

An excellent translation.

If you only know the Disney film, it comes as a shock to read the original story of Pinocchio and discover that the Talking Cricket is killed by Pinocchio at their very first meeting. This unusual creature, who has lived in Geppetto’s house for a hundred years, offers Pinocchio a ‘great truth’, solemnly advising him that he will never come to any good if he doesn’t find a useful occupation, adding that he pities him for being a puppet.

At these last words, Pinocchio jumped up in a rage, grabbed a wooden mallet from the workbench, and flung it at the Talking Cricket.

Perhaps he didn’t mean to hit him at all, but unfortunately he hit him square on the head. With his last breath the poor Cricket cried cree-cree-cree and then died on the spot, stuck to the wall.

The new translation by Geoffrey Brock is wonderfully faithful to Collodi’s speed and vigour. Until now, the best-known modern translation has been Ann Lawson Lucas’s, and in several respects it is still a better buy, thanks to Lucas’s detailed explanatory notes and full historical preface, which are more useful than Umberto Eco’s thin introduction to the new edition. Judged purely as a translation, however, Brock’s version is more natural and engaging, with a better feeling for how to turn colloquial 19th-century Tuscan into colloquial modern English (or rather colloquial American, which is effectively the same thing).
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(13 of 22 readers found this comment helpful)



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