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The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »

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Customer Comments

Emily Otis has commented on (11) products.

Taipei (Vintage Contemporaries Original) by Tao Lin
Taipei (Vintage Contemporaries Original)

Emily Otis, July 2, 2013

Aside from all the drug use, sadly, this is a book I really identified with. One of my favorite parts is when Paul is at a restaurant with a group of people, and is thinking back on all the opportunities he had to go home during the evening.

I often feel anti-social, and yes, I too have experienced the, sometimes inexplicable, abrupt and complete ending of relationships. Taipei leaves me pondering these things. Are they so bad? Am I doomed to a lifetime of secluded misery? Is this the direction that our society, with the increasing use of digital communication, is heading? Or, is Paul and Erin's (and my) story just the modern iteration of socially awkward people that have always been part of society?

To me, the fact that I'm thinking about these things makes Taipei a great book. When a book touches a nerve, and gets me asking questions, I know the author has accomplished his task beautifully.
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The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente and Ana Juan
The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

Emily Otis, January 1, 2012

This book is the best new fantasy book I have come across in a very long time. Valente draws upon an impressive array of mythological creatures from various cultures, bolstered by her own imagination, to populate Fairyland. My favorite character was a Wyverary, whose mother was a wyvern (French dragon-type creature with only two legs) and whose father was a library. Valente also succeeds in striking the perfect balance between the wonderful, the challenging, and the terrible in Fairyland. This book is engrossing and transporting from beginning to end.
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Kon-Tiki: Across the Pacific by Raft
Kon-Tiki: Across the Pacific by Raft

Emily Otis, February 18, 2011

I hadn't been a reader for a while, and this book re-ignited my love of books. As an adventure book, this may be the best I have ever read. The close relationship that these men on their balsa wood raft develop with the sea is one that few modern people will ever know. Strange fish jump aboard their raft and the night is lit by the stars above and the phosphorescence of the creatures below. Of course, as a scientific or anthropological tome, this book has little (if any) merit. But, rather than detracting from my enjoyment of the book, Heyerdahl's strange theories about native peoples worshipping redheads (guess what color the author's hair is?) first made me chuckle, then led me to think about what other explanations there were for the cultural patterns that he found.
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The Fifth Child (Vintage International) by Doris Lessing
The Fifth Child (Vintage International)

Emily Otis, February 17, 2011

This story is likely to shake any parent or parent-to-be to the core. What happens when your child is your worst nightmare? Despite being raised in a loving household alongside several happy and healthy siblings, Ben is violent, uncontrollable, and insatiable. His destructive behavior spells the end of the family's bucolic life in the English countryside and forces his mother to choose between caring for him and caring for the rest of her family.
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This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All (P.S.) by Marilyn Johnson
This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All (P.S.)

Emily Otis, February 17, 2011

If librarians aren't already your heros, they will be after you read this. From the monumental feat of suing the Attorney General to protect patrons' privacy to the surprisingly commonplace task of cleaning up poop in the stacks, these real-life stories about librarians will have you redoubling your respect for these smart, and often saucy, denizens of the Dewey Decimal system.
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