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Frank Strada has commented on (6) products.

36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction

Frank Strada, April 4, 2010

Goldstein has been referred to by some as a new "new atheist." However, like Cass Seltzer, her protagonist, she's an "atheist with a soul." It's about time the faith v. secularism issue gets tackled in a sensitive and creative way. I've read Hitchens, Dawkins, et al., and they are astute advocates of secularism and good writers all. But as Goldstein has said, sometimes the novel is the best way to get a point across and this very creative, funny and intellectually stimulating work does just that. (One of the funniest characters, Professor Klapper, reminds me of a religious Nero Wolfe - imagine that!) This book is a hard one to put down. You'll also want to keep it after you've read it, primarily for its appendix which contains all the traditional "proofs" of the existence of God along with their refutations.
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Lincoln and Whitman: Parallel Lives in Civil War Washington by Daniel Mark Epstein
Lincoln and Whitman: Parallel Lives in Civil War Washington

Frank Strada, March 28, 2010

I began reading this book wondering what possible connection there could be between Lincoln and Whitman and was pleasantly surprised to learn that there was a strong connection, indeed. The story begins with Lincoln in his Springfield law office leafing through a copy of Leaves of Grass and ends in 1887 with Whitman giving an emotional speech in New York commemorating Lincoln's death. Epstein does a magnificent job of bringing to life two of the most influential and interesting people in American history. I strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in history or literature.
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A Summer of Hummingbirds: Love, Art, and Scandal in the Intersecting Worlds of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Martin Johnson Heade by Christopher Benfey
A Summer of Hummingbirds: Love, Art, and Scandal in the Intersecting Worlds of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Martin Johnson Heade

Frank Strada, January 1, 2010

Benfey has written a fantastic work of U.S. literary and art history. A Summer of Hummingbirds is a page turner that weaves the lives of several influential writers and artists through the 19th century. I was especially struck by new insights into Emily Dickinson and have a new appreciation for her poetry. Benfey also draws a portrait of Harriet Beecher Stowe and her family that illustrates their profound influence on American art, politics and literature. This book is one of the best non-fiction of the decade.
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The Good Soldier (Norton Critical Edition) by Ford Madox Ford
The Good Soldier (Norton Critical Edition)

Frank Strada, January 1, 2010

The Good Soldier was recommended to me as an example of a novel whose narrator can't be trusted to tell the truth. Curious, to say the least, I began reading and found myself involved in a perplexing and confusing chain of events - a puzzle, if not a crime, worthy of the best detectives to try to solve. But that's the surface. On a much deeper level, it is a thrilling study of human emotions and behavior. If I were teaching a course in psychology, I would put it on my recommended, if not required, reading list. Ford wrote this book in 1913, but it is certainly relevant today - some things never change.
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(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)



The Good Soldier (Norton Critical Edition) by Ford Madox Ford
The Good Soldier (Norton Critical Edition)

Frank Strada, January 1, 2010

The Good Soldier was recommended to me as an example of a novel whose narrator can't be trusted to tell the truth. Curious, to say the least, I began reading and found myself involved in a perplexing and confusing chain of events - a puzzle, if not a crime, worthy of the best detectives to try to solve. But that's the surface. On a much deeper level, it is a thrilling study of human emotions and behavior. If I were teaching a course in psychology, I would put it on my recommended, if not required, reading list. Ford wrote this book in 1913, but it is certainly relevant today - some things never change.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)



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