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Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
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    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

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Customer Comments

Gregorio Roth has commented on (43) products.

Lord Jim: A Tale (Everyman's Library) by Joseph Conrad
Lord Jim: A Tale (Everyman's Library)

Gregorio Roth, June 20, 2012

LORD JIM is a novel focused on the imperial zeitgeist of the age. The age is the years between 1876 to the beginning of world war one. Europe was beaming in its nationalism, imperialism, and as well as aliances between nation states. Europe could be seen as a cage where the main event in the WWE would be held, in this corner Germany and the Hapsburgs vs. London and France. We see explorers controlling new lands and new people. We find adventures awaiting.
So what if you don't care about the imperial age? Are you a Star Trek or Battle Star Galactica fan? One then can imagine the ocean as deep space, and the natives as aliens. I found it easier to concentrate on the plot when I imagined Jim as captain Kirk. I could understand the imperialistic superiority over native cultures, if I thought of the natives as aliens or droids.
Conrad poses profound questions: Can a man run away from his past ruins? Or do they hunt him down till the present moment catches up with him? Is the earth big enough to hold the caper?"
I loved the narration by Stewart Lewis on Libri Vox. He does a great job with a tricky book. I could understand Conrad's humor by Stewart Lewis's reading of the novel.
The book overall was imperially commanding.
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The Love & Respect Experience: A Husband-Friendly Devotional That Wives Truly Love by Emerson Eggerichs
The Love & Respect Experience: A Husband-Friendly Devotional That Wives Truly Love

Gregorio Roth, March 22, 2012

We envisioned a marriage that danced beautifully and was a beacon of hope in a pessimistic age. We thought we were doing fine, just fine, with our steps. But sometimes, our feet became tangled up, and as we bent over to untangle the mess, the knot of frustration only got tighter. We asked: How did we get here in this knot of frustration? What can we do to untangle the knot? We did not want to get divorced, we thought, as this would mean that we were disobeying God! Were we to suffer and live in a silent house until we died? These thoughts did cross my mind in the first five years of marriage, however now our marriage is growing brighter with good friendly council and good books like Emerson Eggerichs Love and Respect Experience: A Husband Friendly Devotional.
Gentlemen, we often work more on our occupation than we do on our households. Why? We stay at work, because it is often easier or at least more understandable. As time goes by, our marriages end up in a heap of dusty debris. The devotional walks besides you like a friend. The meditations are great and can be read in less than ten minutes. Eggerichs guides you in a prayer after the meditation that helps through-out the week. Then the weekly action steps will help you put the meditations into a workable plan. The follow up questions can be used to learn from each other and discuss frustrations and joys.
My wife Jessica and I received a free copy from book-sneeze, and liked it so much that we actually bought one for her kindle. We have also recommended this book to our engaged friends Mike and Missy. We feel this book is great for any married couple, no matter how long they have been married.
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The Gospel According to Jesus: A Faith That Restores All Things by Chris Seay
The Gospel According to Jesus: A Faith That Restores All Things

Gregorio Roth, December 15, 2011

The Gospel According to Jesus is an exploration into Christian Living by Chris Seay. For me, readers although, I cannot say that I am a procrastinator in all things, or that I am unacquainted with doing things on time, yet true to my procrastination in composing this review I felt compelled to procrastinate on writing the review because I could not truthfully write something that I dearly wanted to infuse the knowledge of to others, when I write a review I want it to reflect the author’s intent, unlike so many reviews I have the unfortunate chance of reading, I did not want to have the review not give the author a chance to speak before he has spoken, so as I sat down and attempted to write a review of what Chris has given us, the review fell all to pieces.
I had a hard time coming to terms with the question posed by Chris Seay, “What is the gospel?” This question sent me on a year and a half journey, and nearly cost me ability to stay connected in the flux of our momentary sanity. So, first off I owe Chris Seay an apology that it took almost a year and a half to review his book; this is not something I am proud of and would like to ask Thomas Nelson and Chris Seay to forgive me for not getting a review written in a timely fashion. I wish I had an adequate excuse. Or that I could rationalize away my sins. But alas like everything without Christ I fall short again.
That is why I am thankful for the book that Chris has written. His book, in short, is a brilliant investigation into the Gospel and a stepping stone into a personal journey and revelation into what is Christ’s Gospel. He has provided us fellow pilgrims a resource for our Christian Walk.
The Good:
• The book was a pleasure to read.
• Good resources were provided in the book; I loved the prayers.
• It kindles a search into Jesus and the Gospels, it makes you desire to dig deeper.
The Bad:
• As a primary guide it falls short in Christian Theology.
• It is written by a pilgrim who is on the journey; the ideas are not concreted by an expert in the field.
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The Lost World: Being an Account of the Recent Amazing Adventures of Profess (Puffin Classics) by Arthur Conan Doyle
The Lost World: Being an Account of the Recent Amazing Adventures of Profess (Puffin Classics)

Gregorio Roth, October 24, 2011

The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is a model for adventure stories in science fiction. The book influenced Michael Crichton in his creation of the LOST WORLD (Jurassic Park).
Edward Malone, a reporter for the Daily Gazette, finds no real excitement in his life. Ed wants to woo Gladys, but Gladys wants to marry a romantic hero. Gladys does not see Ed as a knightly figure, at least not yet. So Ed must find his romantic quest in the name of his beauty Gladys.
Questions Doyle poses are: will Ed come home a hero? Will this quest earn the right to Gladys’s love? What lost world will Ed find in the Amazon? And what about the dinosaurs and the primitive humans, will he find the missing link?
The book was published in 1912, and exhibits the world of Victorian Empire on the move. British empire was attempting to find “a dreamland of glamour and romance, a land where we had dared much, suffered much, and learned much�"OUR land, as we shall ever fondly call it.*” Caveat lector, the ideas of the Victorian Era are not of our own, and may offend those with politically correct notions.
But this book is a great adventure and I believe a good book for young readers.
Note: One can listen to this on Libri Vox.
*Doyle, Arthur Conan (2011-03-30). The Lost World (Kindle Locations 2705-2706). Kindle Edition.
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Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon
Inherent Vice

Gregorio Roth, August 26, 2011

Thomas Pynchon is a writer who compels the reader to work hard through his books to find a gem at the end of his rainbow. If you want something easy Mr. Pynchon probably is not your cup of tea. But if you are willing to be submerged in a new experience Pynchon is your guide.

Here Pynchon, our rough guide, takes us to the Los Angeles neighborhood that surrounds LAX. The time is 1969, and the mood is hazy. Our government has us involved in a never ending war with a place called Vietnam. The economy is good not great. The beginning of the internet is here but it will not be released to the public till 1991. Charlie Manson has gotten every suburbanite scared of long haired freaks. There seems to be a quite buzz about that feels like it could blow up into a Technicolor Riot at any moment. This is where we find Doc, a private gum shoe, investigating the disappearance of his girlfriend.

Doc is more of a surfer than anything produced by Raymond Chandler. Pynchon does an incredible job of lifting up what subterranean currants made Los Angeles glow dim in the 1980’s. I really enjoyed this book and think that anyone who likes Elmore Leonard or Raymond Chandler would find this book a blast. It also could be the book for all of you interested in social history; with a need to find out what caused something that once was a dream into now a nightmare (stand for bankruptcy, and viral infections). All people who love Shelley Winters will love this book.
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)



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