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Customer Comments

Jeffrey Bluhm has commented on (30) products.

The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief by Francis S Collins
The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief

Jeffrey Bluhm, December 15, 2014

All books that seek to reason a way to belief in God (or a god) suffer from the same problem, which is that ultimately you can't prove what must be a faith-based decision. However, Collins does a good job of looking at the juxtaposition of faith and science, and how each seeks to address the greater questions of life. He then looks at four different world-view options, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each. The strength of this book is actually in his explanation of the scientific perspective, but as a believer he represents that position well, and one can learn a great deal about both science and religion without feeling either side is overrepresented.
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Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett
Raising Steam

Jeffrey Bluhm, November 23, 2014

Yet another thoroughly enjoyable addition to Terry Pratchett's continuously expanding, and immensely creative, Discworld universe. Moist von Lipwig (previously featured in "Going Postal" and "Making Money") is not only in charge of building the first railway, but must do so in time to avert an impending political crisis. Clever plotting, witty dialogue, and laugh-out-loud humor prevail, with a subtle subtext of social commentary. With Harry King, Lord Vetinari, and cameos from many other familiar characters, it is the type of book where you can't wait to turn the page, in order to get to the next one, until you come to the melancholic realization that there's just a few pages left...
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Wool Signed Edition by Hugh Howey
Wool Signed Edition

Jeffrey Bluhm, November 23, 2014

I approached this trilogy (Wool, Shift, and Dust) with great anticipation, but I became increasingly disillusioned as the series progressed and, at the end, find myself moderately disappointed. The basic premise is interesting, as is the way the backstory is gradually revealed as the main plotlines advance. However, most of the major players, in addition to being somewhat unlikeable, are also rather superficially characterized. Half of the 2nd volume follows an teenager as he grows up isolated from contact with others, and in addition to just not being that interesting, it reveals the main weakness of these books: the seeming lack of an editor. The content of these three books would have made a very good single novel, and where the third leaves off would have made a good starting point for continuation of the story. In short, these three novels are one good one stretched too thin.
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Shift (Silo #2) by Hugh Howey
Shift (Silo #2)

Jeffrey Bluhm, November 23, 2014

I approached this trilogy (Wool, Shift, and Dust) with great anticipation, but I became increasingly disillusioned as the series progressed and, at the end, find myself moderately disappointed. The basic premise is interesting, as is the way the backstory is gradually revealed as the main plotlines advance. However, most of the major players, in addition to being somewhat unlikeable, are also rather superficially characterized. Half of the 2nd volume follows an teenager as he grows up isolated from contact with others, and in addition to just not being that interesting, it reveals the main weakness of these books: the seeming lack of an editor. The content of these three books would have made a very good single novel, and where the third leaves off would have made a good starting point for continuation of the story. In short, these three novels are one good one stretched too thin.
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Dust (Silo #3) by Hugh Howey
Dust (Silo #3)

Jeffrey Bluhm, November 23, 2014

I approached this trilogy (Wool, Shift, and Dust) with great anticipation, but I became increasingly disillusioned as the series progressed and, at the end, find myself moderately disappointed. The basic premise is interesting, as is the way the backstory is gradually revealed as the main plotlines advance. However, most of the major players, in addition to being somewhat unlikeable, are also rather superficially characterized. Half of the 2nd volume follows an teenager as he grows up isolated from contact with others, and in addition to just not being that interesting, it reveals the main weakness of these books: the seeming lack of an editor. The content of these three books would have made a very good single novel, and where the third leaves off would have made a good starting point for continuation of the story. In short, these three novels are one good one stretched too thin.
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