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Kirsten has commented on (48) products.

Eyes of the Storm (Bone #3) by Jeff Smith
Eyes of the Storm (Bone #3)

Kirsten, August 18, 2006

Another excellent chapter in the Bone saga. Volume three finds everyone recovering from the attack in volume 2 (and also from the Great Cow Race), and Thorn learns more about her secret past.
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(19 of 45 readers found this comment helpful)



Ancient Mysteries
Ancient Mysteries

Kirsten, August 18, 2006

This is a fun one! James and Thorpe investigate a wide range of popular mysteries about the ancient world: was there a Great Flood? Was there an Atlantis? How were the pyramids built? Was Robin Hood a real person?
The authors cleverly draw you into the mysteries, outlining various theories and then, just when they've got you almost believing that we're descended from Atlanteans, they pick the whole thing apart. They come down pretty hard on some pseudo-archeaologists, particularly Graham Hancock (author of Fingerprints of the Gods), but not unwarrantedly, and they are also quick to point out when other archaeologists and experts have shortsightedly ignored information that falls out of their area of expertise. Some of this wasn't new, but much of it was, and it made for fascinating reading.
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(4 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)



Ravensong: A Natural and Fabulous History of Ravens and Crows by Catherine Feher-Elston
Ravensong: A Natural and Fabulous History of Ravens and Crows

Kirsten, August 18, 2006

This was kind of a disappointment. The first half of the book is comprised of Native American legends and folklore regarding crows and ravens, and the second half is information about crow and raven behavior. I enjoyed the legends, but I was dubious about the lack of context for many of the stories; Feher-Elston seems to imply that crows and ravens play the same or nearly the same role in all Native American cultures, and at times I felt that this similarity might be exaggerated. Feher-Elston also frequently goes a bit new-agey in both this section and the scientific section, which made me cagey about accepting her information on corvid behavior at face value.
All in all, this was an ok book, just not quite what I was looking for, I guess.
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(5 of 13 readers found this comment helpful)



Lucifer #02: Children and Monsters by Mike Carey
Lucifer #02: Children and Monsters

Kirsten, August 18, 2006

I picked this up at the library, mistakenly thinking it was the first in the series. I'd been interested in this series since I've enjoyed Carey's tenure on Hellblazer, and even thought I was a little confused about some events, I got a kick out this book. I will be seeking out more Lucifer titles.
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(8 of 14 readers found this comment helpful)



La Perdida
La Perdida

Kirsten, August 18, 2006

This fantastic graphic novel follows the adventures of a young woman named Carla who embarks on a somewhat misguided journey to Mexico in search of her roots. While she is half Mexican, Carla quickly discovers that her class and cultural background make it impossible for her to ever truly be accepted and fit in with her Mexican friends. Despite this, Carla rejects her ex-pat friends and falls in with Memo, a communist pseudo-intellectual, and his attractive but dim friend Oscar.
Carla's innocence and longing to belong sometimes make you cringe as you're reading. Memo is a jerk and cuts down Carla at every turn, but she puts up with it because of what I can only describe as her liberal white guilt. She's continually caught between cultures -- she rejects her white friends, but simply can't be accepted by her Mexican friends, or at least not by Memo and his fellow "revolutionaries." As it turns out, her wish to belong ends up causing her to overlook more than just Memo's insults, and she finds herself in very real danger.
The events in this book, particularly in the second half, could have failed miserably in the hands of a lesser writer, but Abel does an excellent job of setting things up so that they feel believable. She also manages to keep Carla very real without making her unsympathetic. The artwork is dense and well-suited to the subject, and this is a very rewarding book.
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(15 of 26 readers found this comment helpful)



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