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Interviews | April 8, 2014

Shawn Donley: IMG Gabrielle Zevin: The Powells.com Interview



Gabrielle ZevinThe American Booksellers Association collects nominations from bookstores all over the country for favorite forthcoming titles. The Storied Life of... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry

    Gabrielle Zevin 9781616203214

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Customer Comments

Lani Lee has commented on (4) products.

Knit to Flatter: The Only Instructions You'll Ever Need to Knit Sweaters That Make You Look Good and Feel Great! by Amy Herzog
Knit to Flatter: The Only Instructions You'll Ever Need to Knit Sweaters That Make You Look Good and Feel Great!

Lani Lee, April 7, 2013

How many times have you finished spending hours on a sweater only to relegate it to the back of the closet because it doesn't look right on you? Never waste valuable knitting hours again with Fit to Flatter! This book gives you all the tips you need to choose and modify patterns just for you, from determining your body shape to which design elements most flatter your unique figure. The patterns are broken into chapters for the three body types covered in the book, but if you fall in love with a sweater not in "your" section there are modification instructions for each one. Most also include instruction for adding bust darts, a feature sorely lacking in most knitting patterns. The sweaters themselves are fashionable, with a wide array of styles. There is truly something for everyone. I read this book cover to cover in one sitting and can't recommend it highly enough!
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May We Be Forgiven by A. M. Homes
May We Be Forgiven

Lani Lee, February 3, 2013

Fans of A.M. Homes expect crazy situations and 180 degree plot turns. Her stories and novels are populated with pedophiles, gay parents, parents who casually use drugs and commit arson. Despite these odd casts of characters, at heart her protagonists are suburbanites, the people next door who you wave to each morning on your way to work, scarcely wondering why they are still unshaven in their robes. The passing reference to Cheever in May We Be Forgiven elicits delight that yes, that's the answer to the nagging question: who do these men remind you of?
May We Be Forgiven takes place over a year, following Harold Silver's complete disintegration of his life and his clumsy rebuilding. So much insanity occurs in the first fifty pages of this novel, it's impossible to imagine what could be left of the story to tell. That's Homes' talent though. Silver's struggles to regain a sense of normal while cultivating a life that, for him, is decidedly anything but, eclipse murder and mayhem. Silver is confused, he constantly muses about what is right, along the way picking up a ragtag team of misfits and orphans. He befriends a woman in a supermarket and ends up ingratiating himself in her life. He meets a woman online for casual encounters and finds himself at dinner with her family, husband included. His brother is in a mental health facility, then an experimental prison, and despite his brother's cruelty toward him, Harold visits him and sends him gifts. He's not perfect (see the reference to adultery above), but he strives to be a good man.
The novel progresses at breakneck speed. Homes accomplishes this through the use of short passages and lack of chapters. Without those large breaks, there isn't any natural stopping point for the reader, and the text gives the impression of an absurdly long short story. The increased pace heightens the reader's sense of urgency throughout the narrative. Even during passages when Harold conducts Nixon research (his passion and vocation), the tight writing insures that even history-phobes will read along without complaint.
Written acrobatics aside, these are characters not soon forgotten. Remove the incredible situations and plot lines and the characters alone carry the story. Combining the two is what makes this a distinct A. M. Homes work, and what makes it a must-read.
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May We Be Forgiven by A. M. Homes
May We Be Forgiven

Lani Lee, February 3, 2013

Fans of A.M. Homes expect crazy situations and 180 degree plot turns. Her stories and novels are populated with pedophiles, gay parents, parents who casually use drugs and commit arson. Despite these odd casts of characters, at heart her protagonists are suburbanites, the people next door who you wave to each morning on your way to work, scarcely wondering why they are still unshaven in their robes. The passing reference to Cheever in May We Be Forgiven elicits delight that yes, that's the answer to the nagging question: who do these men remind you of?
May We Be Forgiven takes place over a year, following Harold Silver's complete disintegration of his life and his clumsy rebuilding. So much insanity occurs in the first fifty pages of this novel, it's impossible to imagine what could be left of the story to tell. That's Homes' talent though. Silver's struggles to regain a sense of normal while cultivating a life that, for him, is decidedly anything but, eclipse murder and mayhem. Silver is confused, he constantly muses about what is right, along the way picking up a ragtag team of misfits and orphans. He befriends a woman in a supermarket and ends up ingratiating himself in her life. He meets a woman online for casual encounters and finds himself at dinner with her family, husband included. His brother is in a mental health facility, then an experimental prison, and despite his brother's cruelty toward him, Harold visits him and sends him gifts. He's not perfect (see the reference to adultery above), but he strives to be a good man.
The novel progresses at breakneck speed. Homes accomplishes this through the use of short passages and lack of chapters. Without those large breaks, there isn't any natural stopping point for the reader, and the text gives the impression of an absurdly long short story. The increased pace heightens the reader's sense of urgency throughout the narrative. Even during passages when Harold conducts Nixon research (his passion and vocation), the tight writing insures that even history-phobes will read along without complaint.
Written acrobatics aside, these are characters not soon forgotten. Remove the incredible situations and plot lines and the characters alone carry the story. Combining the two is what makes this a distinct A. M. Homes work, and what makes it a must-read.
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Dear Life: Stories by Alice Munro
Dear Life: Stories

Lani Lee, December 17, 2012

Of course every Munro collection is wonderful (her fans are legion for a reason!), but this is the first collection since Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage that I have devoured so greedily, I hardly paused over her tricks of prose, anxious to see where she was going to take me and what was going to happen. Anyone who is already a fan of Munro will be reminded of some of her earlier work (in particular, I was reminded of Open Secrets in tone and length and narrative gymnastics). This is also a wonderful collection for someone new to Munro, since the shorter stories aren't as daunting (though once you're a fan, you could read a one hundred page "short story" by her and not balk). A special treat is the "Finale" section, wherein Munro reveals a bit of her own story. Of course, she doesn't tell us which parts of the stories are fact and which are fiction, but the elements of her fiction are there, showing a bit of insight into her inspiration. READ THIS BOOK!
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)



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