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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »

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Customer Comments

Lindsay Waite has commented on (57) products.

The German Woman by Paul Griner
The German Woman

Lindsay Waite, December 8, 2013

I am drawn to nonfiction and fiction about the first half of the twentieth century for some reason, and in particular World War II. "The German Woman" is a well-written haunting novel centered on an English nurse (Kate) married to a German doctor who finds herself in a ragtag hospital in eastern Germany during World War I. She and her husband are accused of being spies for the Russians, so the only choice is to try to get to safety. Some of the most horrific descriptions of warfare and utter cruelty almost had me stop reading at times. As the story moves beyond the escape from the horror to Kate settling in London, it takes a different turn. It is the time of World War II. Kate gradually becomes friends with Claus, a filmmaker and an American with Irish and German roots, who is fascinated by her. Their lives, and their relationship, amidst the Nazi bombings of London, are complex and troubling. Griner places you right inside this world so effectively that for the first time I could imagine the horror felt by Londoners as air raid sirens blasted and the Nazis attacked from the skies. I loved this book, and could not put it down. In fact, I will re-read "The German Woman" in a few years (knowing, the second time, that it is ok to gloss over some of the scenes of gut-wrenching cruelty). I will definitely read more of Griner's works, though not at night right before I go to sleep. "Just saying."
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Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. Oliver Sacks by Oliver Sacks
Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. Oliver Sacks

Lindsay Waite, December 8, 2013

I am always intrigued by music and how it originates in people. Musicians like Mozart seemed to have a muse feeding them notes, chord patterns, melodies, and beauty. I read this book also to see what parts of the brain are involved in the creation of music. It is interesting - filled with anecdotes on prodigies, how people with certain ailments (like Parkinson's) are helped with music, the result of brain injuries with respect to musical skills, and so forth. I'm not sure I came away with anything to answer my query other than some knowledge of the parts of the brain involved, but nevertheless it's a book that was worthy of my time.
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Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain by Oliver W. Sacks
Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

Lindsay Waite, December 8, 2013

This review is based on reading the book, not listening to the CD.I am always intrigued by music and how it originates in people. Musicians like Mozart seemed to have a muse feeding them notes, chord patterns, melodies, and beauty. I read this book also to see what parts of the brain are involved in the creation of music. It is interesting - filled with anecdotes on prodigies, how people with certain ailments (like Parkinson's) are helped with music, the result of brain injuries with respect to musical skills, and so forth. I'm not sure I came away with anything to answer my query other than some knowledge of the parts of the brain involved, but nevertheless it's a book that was worthy of my time.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain by Oliver Sacks
Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

Lindsay Waite, December 8, 2013

I am always intrigued by music and how it originates in people. Musicians like Mozart seemed to have a muse feeding them notes, chord patterns, melodies, and beauty. I read this book also to see what parts of the brain are involved in the creation of music. It is interesting - filled with anecdotes on prodigies, how people with certain ailments (like Parkinson's) are helped with music, the result of brain injuries with respect to musical skills, and so forth. I'm not sure I came away with anything to answer my query other than some knowledge of the parts of the brain involved, but nevertheless it's a book that was worthy of my time.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain by Oliver Sacks
Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

Lindsay Waite, December 8, 2013

I am always intrigued by music and how it originates in people. Musicians like Mozart seemed to have a muse feeding them notes, chord patterns, melodies, and beauty. I read this book also to see what parts of the brain are involved in the creation of music. It is interesting - filled with anecdotes on prodigies, how people with certain ailments (like Parkinson's) are helped with music, the result of brain injuries with respect to musical skills, and so forth. I'm not sure I came away with anything to answer my query other than some knowledge of the parts of the brain involved, but nevertheless it's a book that was worthy of my time.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



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