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Lisa Brown has commented on (56) products.

Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King
Full Dark, No Stars

Lisa Brown, August 11, 2011

I enjoyed this book, as I more or less was guaranteed to since SK is just the man. It's not his best, but by no means his worst (and even his worst always seems to be worth reading). Of the four stories contained, I think "Big Driver" was the best. Absolutely flawless in execution. "A Good Marriage" strikes quite a few chords, and "Fair Extension" had a strong Needless Things/Thinner vibe to it, both of which are books I really enjoyed, so that worked. "1922" was easily the least enjoyable of the bunch (though still interesting), but if you can make it through, it's smooth sailing.
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Lady Gaga: Just Dance: The Biography by Helia Phoenix
Lady Gaga: Just Dance: The Biography

Lisa Brown, August 11, 2011

In the interest of full disclosure, let me say that I know the author personally, and she is an absolutely amazing writer. That being said, I didn't get much out of the book. This could be due to the fact that I'm used to reading Phoenix's fiction, and nonfiction (particularly biography) is an entirely different animal. So my expectations were naturally unrealistic, and that felt dissatisfying. To be fair: That's wholly to do with me, not at all the quality of writing. There's some interesting information in here, it's certainly well researched, and the color photography is a nice touch. But it felt to me like a pretty one-sided representation, and while I enjoy Lady Gaga's music, I just don't find her particularly interesting (and after reading this book, I fear I find her regrettably pretentious). If, on the other hand, you're fascinated by Lady Gaga, I think you're bound to enjoy it.
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Lady Gaga: Just Dance: The Biography by Helia Phoenix
Lady Gaga: Just Dance: The Biography

Lisa Brown, August 11, 2011

In the interest of full disclosure, let me say that I know the author personally, and she is an absolutely amazing writer. That being said, I didn't get much out of the book. This could be due to the fact that I'm used to reading Phoenix's fiction, and nonfiction (particularly biography) is an entirely different animal. So my expectations were naturally unrealistic, and that felt dissatisfying. To be fair: That's wholly to do with me, not at all the quality of writing. There's some interesting information in here, it's certainly well researched, and the color photography is a nice touch. But it felt to me like a pretty one-sided representation, and while I enjoy Lady Gaga's music, I just don't find her particularly interesting (and after reading this book, I fear I find her regrettably pretentious). If, on the other hand, you're fascinated by Lady Gaga, I think you're bound to enjoy it.
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Pride and Prejudice and Zombies Deluxe Edition by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies Deluxe Edition

Lisa Brown, August 11, 2011

Unlike the vast majority of die-hard bookworms I seem to know, I am not an Austen fan. In fact, the professor of my undergrad survey on 1800s literature would probably be mortified to know that I've never read her. But Hollywood seems to love her, and every time I've caught part of a filmic adaptation featuring the leading lady who just happened to be in particular vogue when they started production, I received one message loud and clear: There is no appeal in Austen's plots for me. Throw in zombies and ninjas, on the other hand... now we're talking. I've gotta say, I think I prefer Little Women & Werewolves, but this was nearly as good. Great fun, excellent summer reading material. Supposedly a movie is forthcoming. Finally, a Jane Austen(esque) picture I'd actually have a desire to see on the big screen!
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Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card
Ender's Shadow

Lisa Brown, August 11, 2011

I'd heard that this was as good as, if not better than, Ender's Game, which I thoroughly enjoyed, so needless to say I was a tad skeptical. Happily, this didn't disappoint. Rather than Ender Wiggin, this book focuses on Bean, and aside from the opening section (if this were a comic, it'd be Bean's origin story), the rest of the plot is more or less identical to its predecessor. Yet in this second telling, we see all the events from the Battle School and Command School through the lens of Bean's perception, which is fascinating. Can't say that I find Bean to be anywhere near as likable as Wiggin, but there's a pretty satisfying character arc, so that's a bonus. I also really enjoyed the fact that this book investigated the role of religion in Card's imagined society (or any wartime society, really). Throw in some Lord of the Flies overtones, and it's hard to go wrong here.
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