25 Books to Read Before You Die
 
 

Find Books


Read the City


Win Free Books!


PowellsBooks.news


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer

Customer Comments

Megan Willis has commented on (4) products.

Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything across Italy, India and Indonesia by Elizabeth Gilbert
Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything across Italy, India and Indonesia

Megan Willis, February 13, 2008

This book was nothing if not entertaining. It caters primarily to a female audience. Initially Gilbert's use of the metaphor drove me nuts, but she stopped relying on this mechanism so heavily after the first few chapters (I was ready to put it down). Her experiences in India and Indonesia were fascinating, however if you're not interested in yoga or spirituality the reading may get tedious. I would recommend this book for a light "vacation" read or for someone going through a painful divorce/ breakup. This book has that rare ability to pick you up and put you in your happy place.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(19 of 33 readers found this comment helpful)



Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Love in the Time of Cholera

Megan Willis, November 5, 2007

This is the first work I have read by Marquez, but it will not be the last. A wonderful read in a beautiful landscape with excellent character development. It's a convoluted Carribean love story that does not get caught up in romanticism, but rather explores a romantic's struggle with a fifty year obsession and a life enveloped in poetry and flowery prose. A must read that will take the reader into the humid setting and the inner workings of several fascinating characters.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(18 of 30 readers found this comment helpful)



Blindness by Jose Saramago
Blindness

Megan Willis, September 28, 2007

Saramago's frightening work of a world caught in white blindness is graphic to a point where the reader feels uncomfartably trapped in the confines of its pages. The work is ultimately brilliant in its use of one women's healthy eyes to uncover the horror of her companions' whited out world. "Blindness" is unforgettable read that explores variations in human character critically and realistically.
Saramago relies only on the period and comma, but I found his work easily read. Just be prepared for no quotation marks and hardly any clues as to who is speaking (although they are there when necessary). Run-on are also prevalent throughout. It's his style and the flow is easily followed.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(16 of 25 readers found this comment helpful)



The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion
The Year of Magical Thinking

Megan Willis, September 2, 2007

Didion’s portrait of loss is less a heart breaking work of mourning and more an account of Didion’s pragmatic search to understand her grief. One will gain a sense of what immense loss can do the even the most brilliant of human psyches. Didion’s prose is unparalleled in her ability to observe her own lunacy in the weeks and months following her husband’s death. A simple glance at wallpaper can send her into a downward spiral of memories. This work is Didion’s tool to recovery, but also serves as a guide to coping; admitting that normalcy is not an immediate option.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(18 of 28 readers found this comment helpful)



spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.