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Miss Gretchen has commented on (5) products.

Saddest Music in the World
Saddest Music in the World

Miss Gretchen, November 17, 2007

Lukas, in his review, says it best in regards to this film. I was late to the party in the Guy Maddin appreciation society, and was worried he'd be some kind of pale David Lynch. Although broadly speaking you can compare the two, still, Maddin is "one to a box" as my grandmother used to say. I started my Maddin obsession with his direction of the ballet version of "Dracula: Pages From a Virgin's Diary" with The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, which was definitive. I've been blazing my way through the canon ever since. I also highly recommend The Guy Maddin Collection of short films; "Twilight of the Ice Nymphs" is a David LaChapelle-ish color-saturated extravaganza starring our favorite Borg Queen, Alice Krige; and "The Heart of the World" is a primer of Soviet-style montage packed into six delirious minutes. Many people consider it one of the best avant-garde films ever made.
(Look around for the documentary about him, "Guy Maddin: Waiting for Twilight," it is also superb.)
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(5 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)



Where's My Jetpack?: A Guide to the Amazing Science Fiction Future That Never Arrived by Daniel H. Wilson and Richard Horne
Where's My Jetpack?: A Guide to the Amazing Science Fiction Future That Never Arrived

Miss Gretchen, June 6, 2007

A great gift book! I picked this up as a birthday present after reading the author interview here at Powells. The recipient, an engineer, got a big kick out of it and all of us at the party read out loud from the book our favorite childhood predictions of the space age future (bemoaning the fact that none of us were wearing a unitard or silver flight suit.) Thought provoking, the science is solid, and the graphic design is faboo.
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(17 of 28 readers found this comment helpful)



The Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom
The Closing of the American Mind

Miss Gretchen, June 6, 2007

Conservatives loved this book when it came out, but there is plenty inside for progressives to ponder. After all, aren't we the ones complaining these days about "a flock of parrots trained to squawk whatever brainless propaganda is fed into their empty vapid heads?" Bloom's arguments for education in the liberal arts are compelling, and a core curriculum need not exclude anyone other than a Dead White Male. An open mind can take certain of Bloom's concepts and rearrange them to fit one's own predilections -- if someone is not a reader of the Christian Bible, then whenever Bloom says "Bible," insert your own religious, spiritual, or secular humanist ideals (unless, of course, Bloom is referring to the Christian Bible as a literary or cultural reference.) As a companion book, one can read Michael Berube's What's Liberal about the Liberal Arts?: Classroom Politics and Bias in Higher Education.
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(12 of 26 readers found this comment helpful)



Embedded in America 2007 Day-By-Day Calendar: The Onion Complete News Archives, Volume 16 by The Onion
Embedded in America 2007 Day-By-Day Calendar: The Onion Complete News Archives, Volume 16

Miss Gretchen, November 29, 2006

Last year I waited until the year actually turned over before I thought to buy my Onion Day-By-Day Calendar. Quelle Horreur! It took me forever to find one and it became increasingly harder to face each bleak January morning without my accustomed stiff shot of Onion.

I'm taking no chances this year and I highly recommend this daily dose (as it were) as an eye-opener to anyone whose first noise upon awakening is a groan.
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(3 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)



Gain by Richard Powers
Gain

Miss Gretchen, October 29, 2006

A moving companion to the daily news stories of corruption in corporations. Begin at the beginning, with three brothers, soapmakers, in Boston in the early 1800s. Powers's beautifully drawn characters are so rich and full of soul, that their inexorable transformation into a faceless and heartless corporation is devastating. All the while, through the story of just a housewife, Powers shows how modern people live more effortless lives thanks to that same faceless entity. End at the ending, where the housewife has entered our hearts so fully that we feel the loss of a friend. In no way an antibusiness screed, the novel is a thoughtful meditation on the past and the possibilites of the future.
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(8 of 12 readers found this comment helpful)



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