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Peter Saucerman has commented on (13) products.

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A Caro
The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York

Peter Saucerman, May 20, 2013

I first read this as a grad student of City Planning at Berkeley. I was prepared for a dry, droll slog through 800+ pages. Instead, I found it to be a mesmerizing page-turner, expertly written and fully deserving of the Pulitzer it earned for Robert Caro.

Now granted, one must assume the reader possesses a general interest in local politics, municipal governance, building or planning. If so, one will be rewarded with a fascinating picture of the urban renewal and massive projects that bludgeoned their way through New York - and by extension, through most American cities in the 1950's through 1980's. It is expertly researched, clearly presented and completely readable - a must for any fan of urban history.
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(4 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)



The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
The Art of Fielding

Peter Saucerman, January 30, 2013

Ah, the boys of summer. This was a great autumn read, both for the story line and for the sheer elegance of the craft of writing. It captures all the angst and superstition that seems to cling to baseball streaks, as well as the human fragility attending the breaking of one. But it's the pleasure of reading well written prose that stuck with me. This is a great novel - winter or summer.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)



The Life You Can Save: How to Do Your Part to End World Poverty by Peter Singer
The Life You Can Save: How to Do Your Part to End World Poverty

Peter Saucerman, December 20, 2012

There's nothing quite like the "Holiday Season" to bring out the uneasiness of material introspection: am I doing enough (anything) to eradicate suffering? As I sift through the piles and piles of mailed and on-line entreaties to give to charities, universities, art museums, environmental groups food banks, symphonies, rehab programs pet adoptions; I find myself overwhelmed with confusion at the sheer volume of worthy causes and with guilt - whatever I give, it won't be enough to make a difference.

So it is with ecstatic joy that I read Peter Singer's small gem of a book, "The Life You Can Save". Mr Singer points out in clear terms how far humankind has come in eradicating abject poverty (the answer is heartening, though not complete). He examines the psychology of giving (and resistance to giving) through fascinating social experiments and examples from around the world. He quantifies what it would take, in theory and in fact, to end world poverty - and it is achievable.

Finally, he arrives at an argument that is humane, rational and unavoidable - we can do this, with minimal personal discomfort and great benefit to humankind and to our own souls. This was the best Christmas read I've had in a long, long time.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)



Global Weirdness: Severe Storms, Deadly Heat Waves, Relentless Drought, Rising Seas and the Weather of the Future by Climate Central
Global Weirdness: Severe Storms, Deadly Heat Waves, Relentless Drought, Rising Seas and the Weather of the Future

Peter Saucerman, August 8, 2012

Okay, many of us out here on the coasts don't need any convincing that global warming is upon us - we accept it, try to change our lifestyles, worry about our children's future. But we all know someone - be it Aunt Mildred retired to Arizona, your brother-in-law or your next door neighbor - someone who remains skeptical.

This little book transcends the heated politicized rhetoric that seems to engulf almost all commentary on climate change. It's simple language, clear statements, strong references and informational tone impart real and substantive knowledge without hectoring or nagging. That makes the audience for this a pretty narrow slice, however. If you're already attentive to man-induced climate change, there's not much new here. And if you're steadfastly opposed to accepting it, you're not likely to pick this up voluntarily. No, this is for your Aunt Millie, and maybe your brother-in-law. Give it to him when you see him at Thanksgiving dinner.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)



The Art of Fielding
The Art of Fielding

Peter Saucerman, August 7, 2012

This was such a great summer read! Perfect during the lazy dog days to sink into a beach chair or a hammock and revel in the finely crafted language of good old-fashioned story-telling. Mr. Harbach knows how to turn a phrase, and I enjoyed every page.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)



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