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Customer Comments

Prentise has commented on (4) products.

The Saffron Kitchen by Yasmin Crowther
The Saffron Kitchen

Prentise, January 2, 2012

It is amazing how much feeling, history, variety of viewpoints, and information about cultures and environments can be put into one small book. A very touching, painful, happy, story about how people are affected by their childhoods, parents, and events beyond all their control; the kinds of lives they live; and the choices they make. The ending is one of those where, depending on your viewpoint and how you hope it ends, is either satisfying or frustrating, and is an example of how sometimes we must just choose for ourselves, because no matter how we choose, someone will think it is wrong, and others that it is right. This is an intriguing story about relationships between mothers and daughters, fathers and daughters, lovers, wives and husbands, women and men, and people from two different countries, in this case, Britain and Iran, and the children of intermarriages between these people.
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Every Last One by Anna Quindlen
Every Last One

Prentise, October 1, 2011

I've been on a binge lately of reading books and authors that I've heard a lot about, and I'm learning they are popular for good reasons. When I look at Anna Quindlen's picture, I think she appears too young to write with such depth and maturity about such complex and serious issues, relationships, events, and emotions. Even though the cover tells about sudden violence exploding into these people's lives, it comes so suddenly and without warning, just like it would in real life, that is painfully, sickeningly believable/unbelievable. Somehow, I couldn't stop reading, even though I didn't want to believe what had happened, just like I wouldn't want to believe it if it happened in my family. I wanted to feel the depths of the mother/wife's experience, her resolution, her conflict, her pain, how other people interact with her -- her family, friends, neighbors, associates, foes, therapist, strangers, dog ... how she goes on living, how violence is taking place frequently everywhere and her tragedy starts to diminish in the minds of others. Even though I couldn't stop reading this book every chance I got until it was finished, I was still relieved when it was over; it is interesting that every book has to end somewhere, and this one's ending leaves you with the feeling of this woman's life going on, day by day, year by year, always with the memories of what happened and who is missing, but being strong and choosing to accept happiness when it comes, and choosing to stay alive and purposeful when it doesn't.
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Every Last One by Anna Quindlen
Every Last One

Prentise, October 1, 2011

I've been on a binge lately of reading books and authors that I've heard a lot about, and I'm learning they are popular for good reasons. When I look at Anna Quindlen's picture, I think she appears too young to write with such depth and maturity about such complex and serious issues, relationships, events, and emotions. Even though the cover tells about sudden violence exploding into these people's lives, it comes so suddenly and without warning, just like it would in real life, that is painfully, sickeningly believable/unbelievable. Somehow, I couldn't stop reading, even though I didn't want to believe what had happened, just like I wouldn't want to believe it if it happened in my family. I wanted to feel the depths of the mother/wife's experience, her resolution, her conflict, her pain, how other people interact with her -- her family, friends, neighbors, associates, foes, therapist, strangers, dog ... how she goes on living, how violence is taking place frequently everywhere and her tragedy starts to diminish in the minds of others. Even though I couldn't stop reading this book every chance I got until it was finished, I was still relieved when it was over; it is interesting that every book has to end somewhere, and this one's ending leaves you with the feeling of this woman's life going on, day by day, year by year, always with the memories of what happened and who is missing, but being strong and choosing to accept happiness when it comes, and choosing to stay alive and purposeful when it doesn't.
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The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Poisonwood Bible

Prentise, September 22, 2011

Barbara Kingsolver is so brilliant that it is hard to find words to describe her writing. Somehow, she manages to go inside the minds of five women and girls: a mother and her four daughters; she expresses each one so believably and individually, that after several times of reading each one, I could begin to know which one was speaking without looking at the title of the chapter.
Kingsolver's detailed knowledge of the Congo and its people, environment, animals and plants, weather, food and water supply, culture, lifestyle, beliefs, practices, history, and hopes, as well the involvement of the United States in the Congo's problems is eye- and mind-opening.
I feel that it must have taken her ten years of study to know so much and be able to write about it. Her description of the domineeringly insane Christian missionary who is the husband and father to the females is startling clear; I am only disappointed that she never writes from inside the minds of any of the main men in the story, especially the father.
Kingsolver's political, historical, social, religious, environmental, and relationship comments are startlingly brief and to the point -- she can express a whole chapter or book's worth of viewpoints and information in one or two sentences.
Although it is a big book, it is so engrossing and easy to read, with short chapters that just fly along, it is hard to put down. When I finally got to the end, it was with great relief that so many issues were resolved, so many questions answered, so much meaning clarified ... absolutely stunning -- I can hardly wait to read more of Kingsolver.
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