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Sentina has commented on (39) products.

The Siren Queen: An Ursula Blanchard Mystery at Queen Elizabeth I's Court by Fiona Buckley
The Siren Queen: An Ursula Blanchard Mystery at Queen Elizabeth I's Court

sentina, November 23, 2012

One of the most important elements of this book is the picture it gives of witch hunts against female herbal healers by male doctors:

" ... she was skilled in herbal remedies, which
annoyed almost any physician with whom she came
into contact."

" ... the Withysham physician... was a pompous
individual who had come to me complaining that Gladys
was intruding on his work, by which he meant stealing
his patients. The real root of the trouble was that
her potions usually worked better than his. I was
secretly convinced that some of his were lethal and
that one of his unintentional victims... had died...
probably speeded on her way by his regime of bleeding
and purges."

When the old herbalist, Gladys, is arrested for witchcraft, her accusers say:

"... she was... pretending to be a physician, which
is an art to be practiced only by men."

There is also a strong feminist element, both in Ursula, who is definitely not meekly subservient to her husband, and her age 14 daughter, who eventually realizes on her own that the cold-eyed, manipulative older man who wants to wed and mold her, would do all he could to destroy her intelligence, independent thinking, and strength.

"It wouldn't have occurred to him that to treat a
young girl like a filly for sale might upset her or
her guardians."

Although the "detective story" does not get exciting until quite a way into the book, it DOES get gripping then. Ursula, her daughter Meg, and her husband Hugh are all believably intelligent, tender, compassionate, courageous, and strong people. The mystery story takes its intriguing time developing, and I really wanted to know what would happen.

After reading several other historical novels about this era in England, I found this one lacking the much broader and deeper detail that was present in the others. Since the author, Fiona Buckley, lives in England, perhaps she is assuming a wider knowledge and belief base in her readers. For example, Buckley takes a completely unsympathetic viewpoint of Queen Mary of Scotland as conniving and power mad that has been attributed to her by her detractors, but I have read novels that present her from multi-faceted views, which are clearly much more realistic and definitely more interesting.

The author also seems to know that her readers automatically know who Cecil is, which she barely explains, and he, too, is presented from a very narrow viewpoint.

However, her descriptons of clothes, buildings, speech and social patterns, social classes, political and economic machinations, power struggles, Queen Elizabeth's dress and behavior, the casual execution of starving people who steal bread, the insanity of countries fighting over two very similar religions (Catholic and Anglican), as well as good-hearted people vs nasty villains are excellent.
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The Siren Queen: An Ursula Blanchard Mystery at Queen Elizabeth I's Court by Fiona Buckley
The Siren Queen: An Ursula Blanchard Mystery at Queen Elizabeth I's Court

sentina, November 23, 2012

One of the most important elements of this book is the picture it gives of witch hunts against female herbal healers by male doctors:

" ... she was skilled in herbal remedies, which
annoyed almost any physician with whom she came
into contact."

" ... the Withysham physician... was a pompous
individual who had come to me complaining that Gladys
was intruding on his work, by which he meant stealing
his patients. The real root of the trouble was that
her potions usually worked better than his. I was
secretly convinced that some of his were lethal and
that one of his unintentional victims... had died...
probably speeded on her way by his regime of bleeding
and purges."

When the old herbalist, Gladys, is arrested for witchcraft, her accusers say:

"... she was... pretending to be a physician, which
is an art to be practiced only by men."

There is also a strong feminist element, both in Ursula, who is definitely not meekly subservient to her husband, and her age 14 daughter, who eventually realizes on her own that the cold-eyed, manipulative older man who wants to wed and mold her, would do all he could to destroy her intelligence, independent thinking, and strength.

"It wouldn't have occurred to him that to treat a
young girl like a filly for sale might upset her or
her guardians."

Although the "detective story" does not get exciting until quite a way into the book, it DOES get gripping then. Ursula, her daughter Meg, and her husband Hugh are all believably intelligent, tender, compassionate, courageous, and strong people. The mystery story takes its intriguing time developing, and I really wanted to know what would happen.

After reading several other historical novels about this era in England, I found this one lacking the much broader and deeper detail that was present in the others. Since the author, Fiona Buckley, lives in England, perhaps she is assuming a wider knowledge and belief base in her readers. For example, Buckley takes a completely unsympathetic viewpoint of Queen Mary of Scotland as conniving and power mad that has been attributed to her by her detractors, but I have read novels that present her from multi-faceted views, which are clearly much more realistic and definitely more interesting.

The author also seems to know that her readers automatically know who Cecil is, which she barely explains, and he, too, is presented from a very narrow viewpoint.

However, her descriptons of clothes, buildings, speech and social patterns, social classes, political and economic machinations, power struggles, Queen Elizabeth's dress and behavior, the casual execution of starving people who steal bread, the insanity of countries fighting over two very similar religions (Catholic and Anglican), as well as good-hearted people vs nasty villains are excellent.
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Middlesex (Oprah's Book Club Selection #58) by Jeffrey Eugenides
Middlesex (Oprah's Book Club Selection #58)

sentina, November 23, 2012

What an appropriate title for a book that deals with "the third sex" -- hermaphrodites who are the one percent of people born with physical and hormonal characteristics of both male and female genders. "Middlesex" is a blend of racial, social, sexual, and family dynamics, as well as history, reproductive science, genetics, economics, politics, environment, and personal experience that is surprisingly non-egocentric and touching.

Jeffrey Eugenides writes as though the main character, Calliope, is a fully aware and functioning person waiting to be born over several generations and observing everything that is going on, even as some cells in her/his mother. This fantasy actually lends credibility to the sequence of events that the author describes.

There are stunning revelations about the intrusive bullying of medical "specialists" who want to control hermaphrodites' lives, through surgery, rather than allowing these people to make their own choices when they grow up.

I found it difficult to plow through the extensive scientific and historical information early in the book, much of which is written as though it is common knowledge, but the parts that deal with Calliope's family, community, and sexuality are engrossing. I have a much broader view of human sexuality and the way we look at ourselves, each other, and the world after reading this story.
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(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)



Empress (P.S.) by Shan Sa
Empress (P.S.)

sentina, October 29, 2012

An expansive vision of Chinese history and one of the world's early feminists.

One caveat about this edition: the print is rather small, and I had to get stronger reading glasses in order to read it, but it was worth it.

The story begins with the Empress recalling and describing her own birth process, with birth images that are the most unique I've ever heard before, clearly conveyed without ever saying "birth" and making me feel like I was being born. The story ends with her still being aware and conscious during and after her death, so that she is both experiencing and observing.

The little known Empress Wu was China's "first and only female emperor, who emerged in the 7th Century during the great Tang Dynasty." Her reign was significant, but as with many important women in history, she has been vilified and denied after her death. Author Sa has done extensive research, including drawing from the several books that Empress Wu wrote, and has given an in-depth, mind-opening picture of Empress Wu and her culture.

Although Wu had great power, she was in important ways still a slave -- she gave birth to several children, but wasn't allowed to nurse or raise any of them, so they barely had any relationship with her. "In all of China, I had no other master but myself; I had become my own jailor, and I was my own prisoner."

Her entire career as royalty required her to wear elaborate headpieces weighing as much as 24 lbs, so she was in constant pain, plus extreme make-up and costumes. One of her innovations was to simplify her clothes and those of the ladies around her, but she never gave up the head weights and make-up.

Another innovation was that she opened her government to requests and information from the general population outside the walls of the royal compound; although she ordered the killing of anyone who might be considered a possible enemy, she cared more about the people than any other emperor up until then. Under her rule, trade via the rivers and between towns increased greatly... "... gone were the intransigent segregaton and the fatal lack of social mobility," and "A people's energy was now more important than their aesthetic learning..."

The amount of hateful infighting and casual killing, even among family members, was shocking. Every time anyone disagreed with anyone in power, including Empress Wu, got murdered. When someone was killed like this, their whole families were murdered, too, and this happened to Wu's family after her death. Even her lovers were killed by her enemies when she was much older.

One stunning living condition was that 10,000 young single women had to live together in special quarters, where they are never allowed to have children and homosexuality is their only sexual outlet, with their only hope for improving their lives is to be selected by a male emperor to have babies with. Wu herself he experiences incest with her brother and has both female and male lovers.

There were also separate similar quarters for 10,000 young men. Women and men were "prisoner(s) of the forced inactivity of the imperial court."

Everyone had dramatic names such as Heavenlight (the Empress), Little Phoenix, Delicate Concubine, Harmony, Purity, Splendor, Prosperity, Simplicity, Gentleness, & Little Treasure; and sets of years were called the Eras of Eternal Magnificence, Lowered Arms and Joined Hands, and so on.

Even 600 years ago, the Chinese were so heavily populated that a procession had thousands of people and went on for miles.

Some more favorite lines:

"Our ... quest for a spiritual essence denied the warmth of the senses and the shims of the heart."

"Every religion was a blade that allowed its faithful to carve up the lie that is life."

"The Court started to imitate my warrior-nun style." "I had in my hand an invisible sword that sliced through every illusion."

"The mannerist poets disappeared from court: their superficial moaning was replaced by powerful verses with simple rhythms full of vibrant emotion."

In an interesting parallel to the Jesus story, an emperor was considered
"... worthy of being the one and only initiated person on Earth, ... the sublime sacrifice that the people made to the gods, ... the Savior of the World."

"... I felt ashamed for living in artificial abundance within a fortified city. This Court bathing in its happiness was a miraculous island in an ocean of misery."

Even though she was very old, when Wu accepted two new lovers, she increased her "ecstasy by night" and her "lucidity by day." Her "reawakening to life stimulated the rebirth of the empire. The years of famine and epidemics were forgotten. Grain stores were filled...; there were abundant meat, game, and fish ..."

"I left it to the Court to adward me the pompous and ambiguous title of Divine Mother Sacred Emperor that interwove masculinity and femininity."

"My sacred mission would be accomplished only if I inaugurated a new dynasty based on peace, compassion, and divine justice... This change of dynasty would see no bloodshed or violence." (She wins against the sexist males who want to push her out and regain male power after her husband dies.)

"... my last mission on this lowly earth -- pacifying the murderous conflict between Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. My dynasty would recognize these three doctrines and three pillars of Chinese thought... the three religions had the same veins through which the one and only source of Wonderment flowed."

"Why did anyone invent mirrors to glorify and assassinate women?"

"The more I was surrounded, the more I was alone."
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(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)



Hell Island by Matthew Reilly
Hell Island

sentina, October 4, 2012

I read this book for the very reason that the author wrote it -- it is short, exciting, and easy to read. Although I wasn't attracted at all by the title or the subject matter, which sounded gross, I needed something quick to read. It turned out that I actually enjoyed a lot of it, especially the portrayal of the intelligent, creative thoughts and actions of the main characters. Thankfully, the story was NOT the constant "kick butt, over-the-top, blindingly fast... non-stop rampage of all out action from start to finish" that the author claims it is -- that would have been boring and exhausting.

Aside from the melodramatic use of the word "Hell" for the location of the drama, my only objection is that the ending was too easy... clearly, there would still be trouble ahead for the heros.
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