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Customer Comments

Too Many Notes has commented on (9) products.

Skippy Dies by Paul Murray
Skippy Dies

Too Many Notes, October 17, 2010

Brilliant. It was strange to get one third of this book from Indiespensable, but that was enough to get me hooked. Now I own 1.3 copies, and no regrets. Mix Irish boarding schools, religion in the modern world, the mysteries of the 14-year-old mind, doughnut shops, text message haiku, and quantum mechanics- and the result is funny, terrible, poignant and beautiful. The kind of book to inspire the right sort of cliches, like: "It will stay with you for a long time."
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(5 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)



Blackout by Connie Willis
Blackout

Too Many Notes, May 4, 2010

Connie Willis is back with the first part of an epic, one that draws on her usual strengths and exhibits new ones. Time travel features again, though the troubles with that particular type of travel are only a backdrop for different stories of the English people during World War II. Willis is so very good at creating a vivid sense of place, and, more importantly, character, while maintaining various story threads. It's easy to bond with these people who, like us, start as objective observers, only to be completely immersed in a very real, very chaotic world. I am finding it hard to wait for the second act...
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(5 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)



The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic -- and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson
The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic -- and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

Too Many Notes, January 22, 2010

A compelling and insightful read, one that should have a wide appeal. A historical look at disease and the city of London in the 1850s, told through the very human story of discovery. Dr. John Snow and the Reverend Henry Whitehead were quietly determined to find solutions and to genuinely help people, working against both popular theories and panic. Well written and well researched, though the conclusion is less so, and Johnson's epilogue felt a little clunky. Still, the kind book that unexpectedly pops up in conversation often, and becomes recommended by all sorts of readers (initially pitched to me by a fan of medical thrillers, followed by a plug from a biotech professor, and finally shared by a lone literary critic).
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(4 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)



The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
The God of Small Things

Too Many Notes, January 22, 2010

This is one of the few books that I've read in which the landscape, characters and themes inhabit an absolute place in my mind. It seems to be becoming rarer for a work to make this kind of world for itself-- to refuse to be budged, hundreds of books and many years later. At first, this is a gently paced, slow reveal of a novel, connecting a shared history in the small events and needs and colors of a childhood. There is so much here on the nature of family and status, on the way that lives connect in ways that are usually fully selfish, yet may still bring brief moments of happiness. Catastrophe is accidental, or quiet, or starts so small and guiltless that the culmination brings a sense of very real grief. Roy clearly has a love of language, and understands both the social and private landscape of words. She creates characters who are at once raw and dreamlike, inhabitants of a lush world sentenced to entropy.
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(2 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)



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