The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Find Books


Read the City


Win Free Books!


PowellsBooks.news


Original Essays | July 24, 2014

Jessica Valenti: IMG Full Frontal Feminism Revisited



It is arguably the worst and best time to be a feminist. In the years since I first wrote Full Frontal Feminism, we've seen a huge cultural shift in... Continue »
  1. $11.90 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer

Customer Comments

boehnlei has commented on (13) products.

Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place by Terry Tempest Williams
Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place

boehnlei, October 31, 2011

I divided the reading of this book into two different chunks, at first overwhelmed by the precision, depth, and complexity of Williams' writing. The second time, I was blown away again but sped through the book, completely consumed. I am amazed by the way that Williams merges her scientific, naturalist knowledge with the details of her personal life, using one as a metaphor for the other. I am looking forward to reading more by Williams!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell
My Family and Other Animals

boehnlei, October 31, 2011

I loved Durrell's description in this novel of living on an island in Greece with his crazy family! He loved the natural world as a child and grew up to found zoos abroad so his attention to detail and his wonderment about the world was very contagious, as was his sparkling writing style. Durrell's narrative voice is hilarious even though it was written about his childhood in the 1950s. His family is crazy!!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Crow Planet: Essential Wisdom from the Urban Wilderness by Lyanda Lynn Haupt
Crow Planet: Essential Wisdom from the Urban Wilderness

boehnlei, October 31, 2011

A good nonfiction book by ornithologist, mother, naturalist, educator, and writer from Seattle. It's primarily about crows but brings up many other issues about urban wildlife. Haupt questions the presence of crows in the urban environment- signs of human imposition on native species and habitat loss but also possible ways to connect humans to the natural world in urban environments. These two often seem incompatible, but with a little openness on the part of city-dwellers, we can begin to see how man-made and natural can become intertwined and symbiotic. I was intrigued by Haupt's questions and her intelligence when it came to scientific knowledge. She was very thorough in her research and this book will definitely guide my own urban wildlife muses.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann
Let the Great World Spin

boehnlei, October 31, 2011

It took awhile to get into this novel, but I ended up really enjoying it. It's made up of many different overlapping stories of people living in all strata of NYC and how they cohabitate in a big city. Even though this is fiction, it reminded me that we are all connected to more people than we think- from mere scratches or brief run-ins to friends of friends to the deepest of relationships. We are all constantly orbiting each other all around the world. Our web and network is strong and overlapping. McCann seems to say that it's the connections we make- big and small- and the millions of people we cohabit with that keep us going. There is a great mystery, an unknown, a black box of the future looming out at us, but somehow we know that it will be worth it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: A Novel by Jonathan Safran Foer
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close: A Novel

boehnlei, October 31, 2011

My friend had been recommending this book and author to me for a very long time and I'm glad I finally picked it up! It began very lightly, as you realize that the hilariously intelligent, pondering, imaginatively uninhibited narrator is a 9 year old boy. But as the story goes on, you slowly realize that his narration is always colored- by grief, or what he refers to as "heavy boots"- a 9 year old coming to terms with and trying to figure out how to really live after his father's tragic death on 9/11. As a reader, I was disheartened by the horrific circumstances of his father's death and the family's subsequent mourning throughout the novel, but I do realize that this is the reality for a lot of families who lost loved ones on that day. The plot is highlighted by the background story of Oskar's grandparents who are broken but still somehow living life after WWII. An incredibly profound, complex, and thought-provoking novel- Oskar's narration will be rolling around my head for a long while.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



1-5 of 13next
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.