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Original Essays | September 4, 2014

Edward E. Baptist: IMG The Two Bodies of The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism



My new book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, is the story of two bodies. The first body was the new... Continue »
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cyndiec has commented on (5) products.

Bring Up the Bodies (A John MacRae Book) by Hilary Mantel
Bring Up the Bodies (A John MacRae Book)

cyndiec, January 31, 2013

Hilary Mantel won the Booker for this and its predecessor Wolf Hall. That she became only the third person to win two Bookers is understandable when you read this series about the much hated Thomas Cromwell, a commoner who rose to great power doing the bidding of Henry VIII. Mantel can somehow relate Cromwell's deadly accomplishments without succumbing to creating a monster is quite astounding. She handles the complexities of life in a treacherous time with fascinating skill.
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Bring Up the Bodies (A John MacRae Book) by Hilary Mantel
Bring Up the Bodies (A John MacRae Book)

cyndiec, January 31, 2013

Hilary Mantel has an eccentric style of not segregating characters' dialogue by the usual devices of quotes, new lines, 'he said' attributions, etc.. This was at first annoying but eventually came to seem essential to the pace and to the creation of a necessary paradoxical atmosphere. She is a master of character development. In this sequel to "Wolf Hall" she returns to her unlikely protagonist Thomas Cromwell. In Wolf Hall he was instrumental in getting Henry VIII what he wanted - Anne Boleyn. In this novel Henry wants the once lusted after Anne Boleyn to disappear so he can wed Jane Seymour. That Mantel can somehow relate Cromwell's deadly accomplishments without succumbing to creating a monster is quite astounding. She handles the complexities of life in a treacherous time with fascinating skill.
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Rondo by Kazimierz Brandys
Rondo

cyndiec, July 22, 2011

What is truth and what is illusion. Kazimierz Brandys looks for answers through the story of Tom - a young man in Warsaw during WWII. From the remove of cold war Poland, Tom sends a rebuttal to an article written in a magazine by Professor Janota. Tom wishes to explain the true origin of a WWII Polish resistance group called Rondo. What follows is a tale of unrequited love amongst the secret world of a city held captive. This looks at WWII from a point of view unlike most other literature about that era. Nazis, Allies and Holocaust victims are acknowledged but this is not their story. Ultimately Tom reveals that even in the dark circumstances of Warsaw in the 1940s people proceeded along paths their nature dictated. The narrative can be tricky to follow. The narrator has little regard for chronology,skipping about from pre-war to post war events with the heaviest focus on the actual war years. He frequently makes allusions to people not yet introduced, promising to explain later. In the end it assumes the structure of all memory - bits and pieces flowing together to create a complete story.
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The Book of Ebenezer Le Page (New York Review Books Classics) by G B Edwards
The Book of Ebenezer Le Page (New York Review Books Classics)

cyndiec, April 19, 2009

Oh my - where does one begin? If you were only going to write one novel in your life - this would be the level of mastery you would aspire to. Ebenezer Page never leaves the island of Guernsey (except for one trip to Jersey for a game) but his simple tale is made wondrous with nothing more then the raw ingredients of life. Gerald Basil Edward's complete understanding of and sympathy for his many characters makes each one almost appear in the air by your side. I agreed absolutely with the author of Lord Of The Flies, William Golding, when he said about this book "to read it is not like reading but living". Take a trip through the first half of the 20th century with a witness who really saw and understood it all, from his vantage point on a little island between England and France. The New York Review of Books is always a great source for little known but brilliant books saved from obscurity. We are so lucky they are out there re-printing these amazing works of art.
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(6 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)



Racist America: Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations by Joe R. Feagin
Racist America: Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations

cyndiec, March 12, 2009

I enjoyed this book. It is well paced and creates enough mystery to keep you involved and eager to learn more. The author is adept with descriptions and pulls you in quickly. He creates his characters with such care that you find it easy to care about them too. In the end, he leaves a great deal unsaid. In some ways i like that, as it demands that the reader really consider what they do or do not believe. But I also wish that it was a little easier to understand the author's intent.
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