Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores

Customer Comments

educationofahana has commented on (3) products.

Emma Kate by Patricia Polacco
Emma Kate

educationofahana, July 9, 2010

Emma Kate is a story about the friendship between a girl and an elephant, who “do just about everything together”. These include walking to school, sitting next to each other in class, playing together at recess, having lunch, riding their bikes back to home, doing homework, having sleepovers, going to soccer practice, taking long walks to watch the clouds in the sky, reading together and even getting their tonsils removed together and enjoying pink ice-cream afterwards.

So they just sound like an ordinary pair of best friends, right? Not really. Emma Kate comes with a surprise twist ending, that I don’t want to give out here. But I will tell you - pay attention to the drawings as you read. These “soft, beautiful pencil drawings and bright watercolors” are an outstanding feature of this book. Emma Kate’s red dress with blue flowers stand out strikingly against the gray, black and white sketches of her elephant friend and the background.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Where Did Daddy's Hair Go? by illustrated by Henry Payne
Where Did Daddy's Hair Go?

educationofahana, July 9, 2010

For a world which was born almost bald, we place a lot of importance in having hair. Jeremiah Jensen, a little boy who had never thought much about hair before his dad gets called “Baldy” at a baseball game, suddenly realizes that he, too, could be without hair one day. Overhearing only part of a conversation on the phone where his dad says, “Ever since I lost my hair…”, Jeremiah takes it upon himself to locate daddy’s missing hair. He searches for it in the house, in closets, cupboards and drawers, in the bathtub, the garage and even looks for it in the toilet. He searches in trash cans, under rocks and in the yard and still finds no hair.

All of a sudden his eyes open up to all the things around him which look like his dad’s head - a pencil eraser, a hill with no grass on top, a camel’s hump, a turtle and a pig but concludes that “none of these things really lost their hair… some of them didn’t even have hair to begin with.” When his baby sister, Rosalie’s bald head gives him the idea that his dad might have been “just born like that”, he looks for confirmation, only to find out that he too once was bald as a baby and that his dad once had hair, which fell out little by little as he grew older.

Jeremiah pictures his dad with different kinds of hair and asks him questions like, “Did it hurt when your hair came out?”, “Did it bleed?”, “Did you cry?”. When he goes to the beach next day, he observes the different kinds of bodies around him, their shapes, sizes, colors, hair and hairlessness. He even picks out the different kinds of bald heads. “Some looked like doughnuts, others like horseshoes. Some were completely bald like the man in the moon.” And he concludes that he has no need to find his daddy’s hair and he thinks his father is perfect just the way he is.

Written by Joe O’Connor, who claims to be “unabashedly, magnificently bald”, this book’s comic artwork, by Henry Payne (“still in full possession of his hair”) is a pleasure to look at. Coming to terms with the fact that everyone looks different, Jeremiah teaches all of us older people a lesson in humility. I like it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



Where Did Daddy's Hair Go? by illustrated by Henry Payne
Where Did Daddy's Hair Go?

educationofahana, July 9, 2010

For a world which was born almost bald, we place a lot of importance in having hair. Jeremiah Jensen, a little boy who had never thought much about hair before his dad gets called “Baldy” at a baseball game, suddenly realizes that he, too, could be without hair one day. Overhearing only part of a conversation on the phone where his dad says, “Ever since I lost my hair…”, Jeremiah takes it upon himself to locate daddy’s missing hair. He searches for it in the house, in closets, cupboards and drawers, in the bathtub, the garage and even looks for it in the toilet. He searches in trash cans, under rocks and in the yard and still finds no hair.

All of a sudden his eyes open up to all the things around him which look like his dad’s head - a pencil eraser, a hill with no grass on top, a camel’s hump, a turtle and a pig but concludes that “none of these things really lost their hair… some of them didn’t even have hair to begin with.” When his baby sister, Rosalie’s bald head gives him the idea that his dad might have been “just born like that”, he looks for confirmation, only to find out that he too once was bald as a baby and that his dad once had hair, which fell out little by little as he grew older.

Jeremiah pictures his dad with different kinds of hair and asks him questions like, “Did it hurt when your hair came out?”, “Did it bleed?”, “Did you cry?”. When he goes to the beach next day, he observes the different kinds of bodies around him, their shapes, sizes, colors, hair and hairlessness. He even picks out the different kinds of bald heads. “Some looked like doughnuts, others like horseshoes. Some were completely bald like the man in the moon.” And he concludes that he has no need to find his daddy’s hair and he thinks his father is perfect just the way he is.

Written by Joe O’Connor, who claims to be “unabashedly, magnificently bald”, this book’s comic artwork, by Henry Payne (“still in full possession of his hair”) is a pleasure to look at. Coming to terms with the fact that everyone looks different, Jeremiah teaches all of us older people a lesson in humility. I like it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No



spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.