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eglazier has commented on (18) products.

A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century by Barbara W Tuchman
A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

eglazier, September 2, 2011

The 14th century in Europe might seem to be a subject of little interest to us today, but this telling of all that occurred from 1300 to about 1450, centering on one noble family and the terrible results of the Black Death of 1348 to 1350 during which about 1/3rd of the population of the civilized world at that time died makes a real story read in some ways like fiction.
This month of September is the 10th anniversary of a great disaster that occurred in the United States, but that was nothing to what happened all during this earlier century to the known civilized world. We can learn how well humanity survives under circumstances of great stress and of almost no technical advances.
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The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush by Pierre Berton
The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush

eglazier, September 2, 2011

The story of the Klondike gold rush of 1896, the last great gold rush of our time. It is not the gold that is interesting but the actions made by those who left home and searched for it and what they did aftre they found it. It is the story of people so caught up in the craze for the riches that the whole range of humanity is displayed for us. We read of bravery, the overcoming of great hardship, the ignorance of what the seekers would find so far north, and the enormous difficulties of getting there. All of the human attributes, including all the base ones, are pictured for us to see. Best of all it is a story with endings that we look forward to as the story unfolds.
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On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society
On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society

eglazier, August 28, 2010

i am sure the book is a good study but for one mistake. the canard that most riflemen did not fire their weapons during WWII was generally attributed to gen. s.l.a. marshall and he was wrong. the reviewer that thought this was a good idea would seem to be full of wishful thinking. in combat not using your weapon means not supporting your buddies and would seem to be a death sentence for those depending on your support. war is hell, but those in the middle of it deserve better from their comrades. it is also a way to stay alive.
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This Is How It Starts by Grant Ginder
This Is How It Starts

eglazier, April 13, 2010

if one likes reading about immature people who are constant drunks, this novel is for you. none of the characters here has any redeeming feature. we are treated to a bunch of wealthy, powerful post-teenagers whose power is given them by their brain-dead followers.

i am reminded of my being at grad school and watching a whole class of new students striving for their ph.d. who decided to follow an immature ex-frat guy because he was charasmatic. he convinced them during the first year to form a study group he led to study for their qualifying exams. they followed and in september of the second year, they took the exams and all failed, an unheard of event in any graduate class.

this novel reminds me of that grouping; a bunch of naive followers following a ner'e do well drunk to defeat and obscurity.

best advice, find something much better to read. it cost me $14. at barnes and nobel to learn this.
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The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
The Fountainhead

eglazier, January 9, 2010

i first read this novel when it was published in 1943 and it captured me completely, but then i was only 14 and i thought as a child.
for all its vaunted fame, it probably is one of the most badly written novels i have had the misfortune to wade through. even if one ignores its childish philosophy that cannot stand up to the scrutiny of the mind of the average adult, the novel itself is full of wooden characters doing stupid things and , because of the mind of the author, getting away with them. there is nothing in this novel that could be called realistic, as anyone who has lived and worked even for a decade in the real world of people would know.
i guess that the worst thing about the novel is that to any thinking person, it is one big bore.
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