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Other titles in the Bcsia Studies in International Security series:

Condemned to Repetition?: The Rise, Fall, and Reprise of Soviet-Russian Military Interventionism, 1973-1996 (Bcsia Studies in International Security)

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Condemned to Repetition?: The Rise, Fall, and Reprise of Soviet-Russian Military Interventionism, 1973-1996 (Bcsia Studies in International Security) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Why did the Soviet Union use less force to preserve the Soviet empire from 1989 to 1991 than it had used in distant and impoverished Angola in 1975? This book fills a key gap in international relations theories by examining how actors' preferences and causal conceptions change as they learn from their experiences.Andrew Bennett draws on interviews and declassified Politburo documents as well as numerous public statements to establish the views of Soviet and Russian officials. He argues that Soviet leaders drew lessons from their apparent successes in Vietnam and elsewhere in the 1970s that made them more interventionist. Then, as casualties in Afghanistan mounted in the 1980s, Soviet leaders learned different lessons that led them to withdraw from regional conflicts and even to abstain from the use of force as the Soviet empire dissolved. The loss of this empire led to exaggerated fears of "domino effects" within Russia and a resurgence of interventionist views, culminating in the Russian invasion of Chechnya in 1994. Throughout this process, Soviet and Russian leaders and policy experts were divided into competing schools of thought as much by the information to which they were exposed as by their apparent material interests. This helps explain how Gorbachev and other new thinkers were able to prevail over the powerful military-party-industrial complex that had dominated Soviet politics since Stalin's time.

Synopsis:

-- Jack S. Levy, Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University

Synopsis:

Why did the Soviet Union use less force to preserve the Soviet empire from 1989 to 1991 than it had used in distant and impoverished Angola in 1975? This book fills a key gap in international relations theories by examining how actors' preferences and causal conceptions change as they learn from their experiences.

Synopsis:

Andrew Bennett draws on interviews and declassified Politburo documents as well as numerous public statements to establish the views of Soviet and Russian officials. He argues that Soviet leaders drew lessons from their apparent successes in Vietnam and elsewhere in the 1970s that made them more interventionist.

About the Author

Andrew Bennett is Associate Professor of Government at Georgetown University and the author of Condemned to Repetition? The Rise, Fall, and Reprise of Soviet-Russian Military Interventionism, 1973-1996 (MIT Press, 1999).

Table of Contents

Introduction — Alternative explanations for the rise, fall, and reprise of Soviet-Russian military interventionism — Learning theory and the Soviet and Russian systems — Soviet military intervention in Angola, 1975 — Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan, 1979 — Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, 1980-84 — Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan, 1989 — From Soviet withdrawal to Russian intervention, 1989-96 — Conclusion — Index — About the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262522571
Author:
Bennett, Andrew
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Location:
Cambridge, Mass :
Subject:
Military Science
Subject:
History
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Soviet Union
Subject:
Military - Other
Subject:
Russia
Subject:
Military policy
Subject:
1953-1991
Subject:
Intervention.
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Europe - Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Americas (North Central South West Indies)
Subject:
Soviet Union Foreign relations 1985-1991.
Subject:
Russia (Federation) Foreign relations.
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Belfer Center Studies in International Security Condemned to Repetition?
Series Volume:
105-160
Publication Date:
19990931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9.1 x 6.1 x 1.1 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » Russia » Soviet Union

Condemned to Repetition?: The Rise, Fall, and Reprise of Soviet-Russian Military Interventionism, 1973-1996 (Bcsia Studies in International Security) New Trade Paper
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Product details 400 pages MIT Press - English 9780262522571 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , -- Jack S. Levy, Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University
"Synopsis" by , Why did the Soviet Union use less force to preserve the Soviet empire from 1989 to 1991 than it had used in distant and impoverished Angola in 1975? This book fills a key gap in international relations theories by examining how actors' preferences and causal conceptions change as they learn from their experiences.
"Synopsis" by , Andrew Bennett draws on interviews and declassified Politburo documents as well as numerous public statements to establish the views of Soviet and Russian officials. He argues that Soviet leaders drew lessons from their apparent successes in Vietnam and elsewhere in the 1970s that made them more interventionist.
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