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740 Park

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740 Park Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For seventy-five years, it’s been Manhattan’s richest apartment building, and one of the most lusted-after addresses in the world. One apartment had 37 rooms, 14 bathrooms, 43 closets, 11 working fireplaces, a private elevator, and his-and-hers saunas; another at one time had a live-in service staff of 16. To this day, it is steeped in the purest luxury, the kind most of us could only imagine, until now.

The last great building to go up along New York’s Gold Coast, construction on 740 Park finished in 1930. Since then, 740 has been home to an ever-evolving cadre of our wealthiest and most powerful families, some of America’s (and the world’s) oldest money — the kind attached to names like Vanderbilt, Rockefeller, Bouvier, Chrysler, Niarchos, Houghton, and Harkness—and some whose names evoke the excesses of today’s monied elite: Kravis, Koch, Bronfman, Perelman, Steinberg, and Schwarzman. All along, the building has housed titans of industry, political power brokers, international royalty, fabulous scam-artists, and even the lowest scoundrels.

The book begins with the tumultuous story of the building’s construction. Conceived in the bubbling financial, artistic, and social cauldron of 1920’s Manhattan, 740 Park rose to its dizzying heights as the stock market plunged in 1929 — the building was in dire financial straits before the first apartments were sold. The builders include the architectural genius Rosario Candela, the scheming businessman James T. Lee (Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’s grandfather), and a raft of financiers, many of whom were little more than white-collar crooks and grand-scale hustlers.

Once finished, 740 became a magnet for the richest, oldest families in the country: the Brewsters, descendents of the leader of the Plymouth Colony; the socially-registered Bordens, Hoppins, Scovilles, Thornes, and Schermerhorns; and top executives of the Chase Bank, American Express, and U.S. Rubber. Outside the walls of 740 Park, these were the people shaping America culturally and economically. Within those walls, they were indulging in all of the Seven Deadly Sins.

As the social climate evolved throughout the last century, so did 740 Park: after World War II, the building’s rulers eased their more restrictive policies and began allowing Jews (though not to this day African Americans) to reside within their hallowed walls. Nowadays, it is full to bursting with new money, people whose fortunes, though freshly-made, are large enough to buy their way in.

At its core this book is a social history of the American rich, and how the locus of power and influence has shifted haltingly from old bloodlines to new money. But it’s also much more than that: filled with meaty, startling, often tragic stories of the people who lived behind 740’s walls, the book gives us an unprecedented access to worlds of wealth, privilege, and extraordinary folly that are usually hidden behind a scrim of money and influence. This is, truly, how the other half — or at least the other one hundredth of one percent — lives.

Review:

"Of all Manhattan's fabled East Side dwellings of the super-rich, 740 Park Avenue has perhaps the best pedigree. Designed by Rosario Candela and developed by James T. Lee, Jackie O's maternal grandfather, as a cooperative haven for the elite, it had the misfortune to open just as the stock market crashed in 1930 and was forced to operate partly as a rental for some decades. The last sale was to Lee himself, for son-in-law 'Black Jack' Bouvier, his wife and daughters Jackie and Lee. John D. Rockefeller Jr. signed a rental lease in 1936 for a massive apartment (more than 20,000 square feet), and Marshall Field III took another. Gross (Model) has solidly researched the denizens of the building, who they were, what they did, and who and how many times they married. This information, while exhaustive, is also exhausting. Things perk up as we approach the modern era, and the old rich give way to a newer cast of sometimes dubious billionaires. Ron Perelman, Henry Kravis, Steve Ross and Steve Schwartzman are cited among the newer tenants. A bit of a bore for average readers, this will be a useful tome for those interested in New York's social history. Agent, Dan Strone." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Although 740 Park means to entertain the reader with a steady stream of gossip, some of its stories have been exhaustively covered elsewhere....Mr. Gross has done a good job of locating these people, but only a middling job of bringing them to life. Perhaps that's a function of the book's embarrassment of riches." New York Times

Review:

"[I]t can sometimes be arduous to read, especially when Gross writes about one family, drops them for another, then picks them up in a later chapter. Floor plans on the book's endpapers will help keep the reader oriented." Library Journal

Review:

"In 740 Park, Michael Gross penetrates the bewitching and private worlds of the privileged and very rich denizens of 740 Park Avenue on New York's Upper East Side. Gross, a born storyteller, delights in his tales of upstairs and downstairs over the decades in the grand building. This is social history at its best." Dominick Dunne

Review:

"The Lolita of shelter porn...740 Park delves into the rarified world of one of the city's most exclusive co-ops, where billionaires like Ronald Lauder, Steve Schwarzman, and David Koch rest their heads." Michael Calderone, New York Observer

Review:

"740 Park is a historical building that is worthy of the comprehensive and fascinating coverage that Michael Gross has devoted to it. This book is as entertaining as it is informative — it's a terrific story." Donald Trump

About the Author

Michael Gross has written for Esquire, Vanity Fair, Town & Country, and countless other publications. Currently a contributing editor at Travel & Leisure, he is also the author of Genuine Authentic and the New York Times bestselling Model. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385512091
Subtitle:
The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building
Publisher:
Broadway
Author:
Gross, Michael
Subject:
History
Subject:
Sociology - Urban
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Middle Atlantic
Publication Date:
20051018
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
576
Dimensions:
9.53 x 6.52 x 1.5 in 2 lb

Related Subjects

Business » Business Profiles
History and Social Science » Americana » New York
History and Social Science » World History » General

740 Park
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 576 pages Broadway Books - English 9780385512091 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Of all Manhattan's fabled East Side dwellings of the super-rich, 740 Park Avenue has perhaps the best pedigree. Designed by Rosario Candela and developed by James T. Lee, Jackie O's maternal grandfather, as a cooperative haven for the elite, it had the misfortune to open just as the stock market crashed in 1930 and was forced to operate partly as a rental for some decades. The last sale was to Lee himself, for son-in-law 'Black Jack' Bouvier, his wife and daughters Jackie and Lee. John D. Rockefeller Jr. signed a rental lease in 1936 for a massive apartment (more than 20,000 square feet), and Marshall Field III took another. Gross (Model) has solidly researched the denizens of the building, who they were, what they did, and who and how many times they married. This information, while exhaustive, is also exhausting. Things perk up as we approach the modern era, and the old rich give way to a newer cast of sometimes dubious billionaires. Ron Perelman, Henry Kravis, Steve Ross and Steve Schwartzman are cited among the newer tenants. A bit of a bore for average readers, this will be a useful tome for those interested in New York's social history. Agent, Dan Strone." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Although 740 Park means to entertain the reader with a steady stream of gossip, some of its stories have been exhaustively covered elsewhere....Mr. Gross has done a good job of locating these people, but only a middling job of bringing them to life. Perhaps that's a function of the book's embarrassment of riches."
"Review" by , "[I]t can sometimes be arduous to read, especially when Gross writes about one family, drops them for another, then picks them up in a later chapter. Floor plans on the book's endpapers will help keep the reader oriented."
"Review" by , "In 740 Park, Michael Gross penetrates the bewitching and private worlds of the privileged and very rich denizens of 740 Park Avenue on New York's Upper East Side. Gross, a born storyteller, delights in his tales of upstairs and downstairs over the decades in the grand building. This is social history at its best."
"Review" by , "The Lolita of shelter porn...740 Park delves into the rarified world of one of the city's most exclusive co-ops, where billionaires like Ronald Lauder, Steve Schwarzman, and David Koch rest their heads."
"Review" by , "740 Park is a historical building that is worthy of the comprehensive and fascinating coverage that Michael Gross has devoted to it. This book is as entertaining as it is informative — it's a terrific story."
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