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The God Effect: Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon

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The God Effect: Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon Cover

ISBN13: 9780312343415
ISBN10: 0312343418
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true.

What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected, instantly in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect" was one of Einstein's few (and perhaps one of his greatest) mistakes.

What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more.

In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an exceptionally readable and fascinating (and equation-free) account of entanglement, its history, and its application. Fans of Brian Greene and Amir Aczel and those interested in the marvelous possibilities coming down the quantum road will find much to marvel, illuminate, and delight.

Review:

"Science writer Clegg (A Brief History of Infinity), discussing the field of quantum mechanics, asserts that '[e]very experiment takes us a step closer to realizing just how strange the world is at the quantum level.' Quantum entanglement is the oddest of them all. As Clegg explains it, entanglement occurs when two particles (photons, atoms, electrons, etc.) become so intensely linked together that for all intents and purposes they become part of one unit. The mystifying thing is that this link continues even if the two particles are in different parts of the universe: 'Make a change to one particle, and that change is instantly reflected in the other(s) — however far apart they may be.' Clegg does an excellent job of explaining this complex situation in nontechnical terms; he details the many experiments that have consistently suggested that entanglement is real. The implications for future technological advances are huge, and Clegg is at his finest as he embeds potential advances in a broad historical context. Data could be encrypted in unbreakable codes; computers could become thousands of times more powerful than today; objects, and maybe even living organisms, could be instantaneously transported. While highly speculative, these possibilities could change our notion of reality. 27 b&w illus. (July 6)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A masterful account of the phenomenon Einstein thought so crazy it could not possibly be true. (Only it is!)" Dr. Marcus Chown, author of The Universe Next Door

Review:

"A marvelously clear and engaging account of the people and ideas involved in trying to understand the deepest mysteries of the quantum world and convert them into a useful technology." Gregory Chaitin, author of Meta Math! The Quest for Omega

Synopsis:

The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true

What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes.

 

What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more.

In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an exceptionally readable and fascinating (and equation-free) account of entanglement, its history, and its application. Fans of Brian Greene and Amir Aczel and those interested in the marvelous possibilities coming down the quantum road will find much to marvel, illuminate, and delight.

Synopsis:

The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true

What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it “spooky” and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the “God Effect,” was one of Einsteins few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes.

 

What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more.

In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an exceptionally readable and fascinating (and equation-free) account of entanglement, its history, and its application. Fans of Brian Greene and Amir Aczel and those interested in the marvelous possibilities coming down the quantum road will find much to marvel, illuminate, and delight.

Brian Clegg is the author of A Brief History of Infinity, The First Scientist: A Life of Roger Bacon, and Light Years: The Extraordinary Story of Mankind's Fascination with Light. He holds a physics degree from Cambridge and has written regular columns, features, and reviews for numerous magazines. His books have been translated into ten languages. He lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife and two children.
The God Effect, by veteran science writer Brian Clegg, is an accessible and equation-free account of entanglement, its history, and its application.  In scientific terms, entanglement is a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is instantly reflected in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky” and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's fewand perhaps one of his greatestmistakes.

 

The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more. 

"A masterful account of the phenomenon Einstein thought so crazy it could not possibly be true. (Only it is!)"Dr. Marcus Chown, author of The Universe Next Door
 
"A marvelously clear and engaging account of the people and ideas involved in trying to understand the deepest mysteries of the quantum world and convert them into a useful technology."Gregory Chaitin, author of Meta Math! The Quest for Omega
 
"Clegg does an excellent job of explaining [quantum entanglement] in nontechnical terms; he details the many experiments that have consistently suggested that entanglement is real. The implications for future technological advances are huge, and Clegg is at his finest as he embeds potential advances in a broad historical context. Data could be encrypted in unbreakable codes; computers could become thousands of times more powerful than today; objects, and maybe even living organisms, could be instantaneously transported . . . [T]hese possibilities could change our notion of reality."Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Brian Clegg is the author of A Brief History of Infinity, The First Scientist: A Life of Roger Bacon, and Light Years: The Extraordinary Story of Mankind's Fascination with Light. He holds a physics degree from Cambridge and has written regular columns, features, and reviews for numerous magazines. His books have been translated into ten languages. He lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife and two children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Huntress DeLa Luna, August 5, 2013 (view all comments by Huntress DeLa Luna)
The God Effect: Quantum entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon by Brian Clegg is one of my favorite books. This text explains from a scientific perception, teleportation, telepathic communication, law of attraction and encoding of photons to create mass. A very well written text and chronologically in order explaining the existence, founders, and relevance of quantum physics..
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780312343415
Subtitle:
Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon
Author:
Clegg, Brian
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Subject:
Science
Subject:
Physics
Subject:
Quantum Theory
Subject:
General
Subject:
Physics/Quantum Theory
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
June 2006
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 27 bandw illustrations througho
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 x 1.06 in

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The God Effect: Quantum Entanglement, Science's Strangest Phenomenon Used Hardcover
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Product details 288 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312343415 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Science writer Clegg (A Brief History of Infinity), discussing the field of quantum mechanics, asserts that '[e]very experiment takes us a step closer to realizing just how strange the world is at the quantum level.' Quantum entanglement is the oddest of them all. As Clegg explains it, entanglement occurs when two particles (photons, atoms, electrons, etc.) become so intensely linked together that for all intents and purposes they become part of one unit. The mystifying thing is that this link continues even if the two particles are in different parts of the universe: 'Make a change to one particle, and that change is instantly reflected in the other(s) — however far apart they may be.' Clegg does an excellent job of explaining this complex situation in nontechnical terms; he details the many experiments that have consistently suggested that entanglement is real. The implications for future technological advances are huge, and Clegg is at his finest as he embeds potential advances in a broad historical context. Data could be encrypted in unbreakable codes; computers could become thousands of times more powerful than today; objects, and maybe even living organisms, could be instantaneously transported. While highly speculative, these possibilities could change our notion of reality. 27 b&w illus. (July 6)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A masterful account of the phenomenon Einstein thought so crazy it could not possibly be true. (Only it is!)"
"Review" by , "A marvelously clear and engaging account of the people and ideas involved in trying to understand the deepest mysteries of the quantum world and convert them into a useful technology."
"Synopsis" by ,
The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true

What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes.

 

What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more.

In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an exceptionally readable and fascinating (and equation-free) account of entanglement, its history, and its application. Fans of Brian Greene and Amir Aczel and those interested in the marvelous possibilities coming down the quantum road will find much to marvel, illuminate, and delight.

"Synopsis" by ,
The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true

What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it “spooky” and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the “God Effect,” was one of Einsteins few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes.

 

What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more.

In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an exceptionally readable and fascinating (and equation-free) account of entanglement, its history, and its application. Fans of Brian Greene and Amir Aczel and those interested in the marvelous possibilities coming down the quantum road will find much to marvel, illuminate, and delight.

Brian Clegg is the author of A Brief History of Infinity, The First Scientist: A Life of Roger Bacon, and Light Years: The Extraordinary Story of Mankind's Fascination with Light. He holds a physics degree from Cambridge and has written regular columns, features, and reviews for numerous magazines. His books have been translated into ten languages. He lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife and two children.
The God Effect, by veteran science writer Brian Clegg, is an accessible and equation-free account of entanglement, its history, and its application.  In scientific terms, entanglement is a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is instantly reflected in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky” and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's fewand perhaps one of his greatestmistakes.

 

The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more. 

"A masterful account of the phenomenon Einstein thought so crazy it could not possibly be true. (Only it is!)"Dr. Marcus Chown, author of The Universe Next Door
 
"A marvelously clear and engaging account of the people and ideas involved in trying to understand the deepest mysteries of the quantum world and convert them into a useful technology."Gregory Chaitin, author of Meta Math! The Quest for Omega
 
"Clegg does an excellent job of explaining [quantum entanglement] in nontechnical terms; he details the many experiments that have consistently suggested that entanglement is real. The implications for future technological advances are huge, and Clegg is at his finest as he embeds potential advances in a broad historical context. Data could be encrypted in unbreakable codes; computers could become thousands of times more powerful than today; objects, and maybe even living organisms, could be instantaneously transported . . . [T]hese possibilities could change our notion of reality."Publishers Weekly

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