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1 Burnside Judaism- Women

This title in other editions

The Receiving: Reclaiming Jewish Women's Wisdom

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The Receiving: Reclaiming Jewish Women's Wisdom Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One Tenacity in Exile

"Hannah Rachel of Ludomir (1815– 1905)

For over two thousand years, feminine wisdom has run through Jewish history like an underground stream. Submerged by a dominant ethic that did not know how to tap its riches, it was left to meander, discovering its own subterranean path to the ocean. In its long exile, unseen and unlauded, the stream has wended its way beneath desert and temple, glory and wreckage. Intermittently surfacing to the light, laughing out loud at human folly, it always returned to its hidden route, quietly nourishing the earth from below.

But in our time, the underground current of women's wisdom is rising to the surface for good, ready to pour forth its treasures, never to be pushed down again.

Hannah Rachel of Ludomir was one woman mystic who exemplifies this persistent current of feminine wisdom. Literally pushed out of the Jewish community by its male leaders, Hannah Rachel was humiliated and debased because she violated their narrow view of femininity. Nevertheless, this brilliant and tenacious woman succeeded in becoming a testimony to the enduring power of women.

Living in enforced isolation in a tiny green hut, Hannah Rachel had a profound relationship with divine forces, which gave her the strength to withstand the external condemnation she received while she studied, prayed, and made meaning of Judaism's deepest truths. Hannah Rachel's tenacity reminds us that we each must discover our own relationship to God and reclaim and make new meaning of our ancient heritage.

Hannah Rachel's story begins at the turn of the nineteenth century, in a village called Ludomir, on the Lug River in the Ukraine. Her father, asimple Jewish shopkeeper named Monisch Werbermacher, had been counseled by his local rabbi to divorce his barren wife, as Jewish law suggests when a couple have been childless for ten years or more. This would allow him to find a more fertile woman to provide him with children. But Monisch loved his wife, Leah, and Leah loved him. He could not bring himself to follow such advice.

Instead, Monisch journeyed to another rabbi, a sage and miracle worker known as the "Seer of Lublin" (Rabbi Jacob Isaac HaLevi Horovitz) to ask that, if Heaven would allow it, he bless his wife and himself with a child. Monisch stood trembling as the holy man closed his eyes. For a time it was as if he were absent from the room. Finally he said, "Go home. Your wife will soon conceive a child. A holy soul this one is." On his journey home, overflowing with gratitude and awe, Monisch vowed to raise his unborn child to become the learned sage he was meant to become. No effort would be spared.

The following year, Leah bore a daughter. Monisch reeled with shock. "A daughter?" he cried. How could a female become a rabbi or sage? What could the Seer have been seeing? Everyone knew that only male children could take their formal place in the faith. It was not even customary to educate girls in the sacred texts. Letters enough to read Yiddish, yes, and perhaps a little Russian to get along, but nothing more.

Nevertheless, Monisch resolved to fulfill his vow to raise a sage. Against the misgivings of his wife and the Seer of Lublin himself, when the girl, named Hannah Rachel, turned five, she was sent to take instruction in the finest schoolhouse in the area. There she began her career in sacred Hebrew andAramaic texts, all the while sitting behind a screen to keep her apart from her male schoolmates.

Hannah Rachel took to her studies with aplomb. By the time she was eight years old, she had distinguished herself as a scholar, stunning everyone with her ability to memorize, understand, and penetrate the essence of the texts. But there was something amiss and even her father sensed it. Hannah Rachel was too precocious, too solemn; indeed, she seemed not a child at all. Disinterested in playing or socializing, she would withdraw to her room after classes and continue to pore over her tomes. Soon she began to ignore her parents too, speaking only when spoken to. Her mother, weakened from her pregnancy late in life and distressed over her daughter's long silences, grew sick and died. By then Hannah Rachel was nine.

Monisch, now a widower, questioned the wisdom of his bold experiment in raising a daughter to be a scholar. Finally he went to a Jewish court to have his vow annulled and pulled Hannah Rachel out of school. But this only served to aggravate the situation. Hannah Rachel refused to tear herself away from her studies. For days at a time she would not talk; instead, she stood swaying over her large volumes, intoning passages from them in ancient liturgical chant.

As happens in small, tightly knit, communities, the neighbors began to gossip, spreading malicious rumors about Hannah Rachel. Surely she was possessed, some whispered. She was queer and sexless, said others, neither woman nor man. Hannah Rachel was twelve by then and of marriageable age. But when her worried father broached the subject, she replied that she had no inclination whatsoever to be "as other females."

What was Monisch to do? He was a plainspoken man, and his adolescent daughter was getting to be too articulate a scholar for him to fight with. The Seer of Lublin had died the same year his wife had passed away. So he decided to consult the celebrated Hassidic rebbe Mordechai of Chernobyl.

Reluctantly, Hannah Rachel accompanied her father to Chernobyl to see the great preacher. In her presence, the rabbi reprimanded Monisch for having subjected the girl to the holy books. Hannah Rachel herself interrupted the rabbi and began debating on Talmudic grounds why it is indeed permissible for women to study the sacred texts.

"On the very same page of Tractate Sota that you are quoting is the counterargument, Rabbi."

"I see you know the text. But daughter, no one has the right to interfere with the tradition, which is God's intention for women. A woman's fate is marriage and children."

Synopsis:

After lifetime of practice and study later, Firestone sets out to restore the matrilineal line to the patriarchal culture and practice of Judaism. Firestone selects seven women from the recent to the distant past who represent aspects of the "feminine" that have been lost or devalued over the course of Jewish study and practice.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-278).

Synopsis:

The Receiving is the literal translation of the word Kabbalah, the body of Jewish Mysticism that has been passed down from men to men for centuries. Ironically, the art of receiving, that is, opening to the divine spirit as it manifests in the here and now, is one of the undocumented triumphs of women's spirituality. Now, re-spected rabbi and Jungian therapist Tirzah Firestone sets out to correct the enormous error of history that has omitted the contributions of Jewish women mystics, sages, and holy women from the Jewish annals. In what might be called an act of spiritual archaeology, Firestone searches for the traces of the divine feminine in the Jewish tradition in order to answer the question, "What is a woman's way to God?" Drawing on the remarkable stories of seven historical holy women — who, despite all the obstacles, found ways to embrace the sacred feminine in their lives — Firestone teaches us the mysteries of Jewish Kabbalah from a woman's vantage point.

This groundbreaking book finally empowers women to reclaim their rightful — and historic — connection to the mystical lineage within Judaism. This is a provocative work of scholarship and passion that restores the forgotten voices of Jewish women mystics, using their remarkable journeys as a spring-board into the feminine mysteries that have been hidden from women's use for millennia. In The Receiving, these ancient teachings have finally been made available in a relevant, accessible, and life-enriching manner for women — and men — of all spiritual persuasions.

About the Author

Rabbi Tirzah Firestone is the author of the highly acclaimed With Roots in Heaven: One Woman's Passionate Journey into the Heart of Her Faith and is a psychotherapist as well as the founding rabbi of the Jewish Renewal Congregation of Boulder, Colorado. Firestone teaches and lectures nationally on Jewish spirituality. She lives in Boulder with her husband, David, and their three children.

Table of Contents

Tenacity in exile / Hannah Rachel of Ludomir (1815-1905) — Reclaiming eros / Beruriah (second century) — Practical spirituality / Malkah of Belz (ca. 1780-1850) — Recovering feminine wisdom / Asnat Barzani (1590-1670) — Seeing wholly, darkness and light / Dulcie of Worms (ca. 1170-1196) — Bringing purpose into action / Leah Shar'abi (1919-1978) — Receiving the holy spirit / Francesca Sarah and the Female Visionaries of Safed (sixteenth century).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060082703
Subtitle:
Reclaiming Jewish Women's Wisdom
Author:
Firestone, Rabbi Tirzah
Author:
Firestone, Tirzah
Publisher:
HarperOne
Location:
San Francisco
Subject:
Judaism - General
Subject:
Judaism
Subject:
Feminism
Subject:
Jewish women
Subject:
Women in judaism
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
vol.14, no.4(G)
Publication Date:
20030204
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.97 in 18.37 oz

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Related Subjects

Religion » Judaism » Women

The Receiving: Reclaiming Jewish Women's Wisdom Used Hardcover
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$5.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages HarperSanFrancisco - English 9780060082703 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , After lifetime of practice and study later, Firestone sets out to restore the matrilineal line to the patriarchal culture and practice of Judaism. Firestone selects seven women from the recent to the distant past who represent aspects of the "feminine" that have been lost or devalued over the course of Jewish study and practice.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-278).
"Synopsis" by , The Receiving is the literal translation of the word Kabbalah, the body of Jewish Mysticism that has been passed down from men to men for centuries. Ironically, the art of receiving, that is, opening to the divine spirit as it manifests in the here and now, is one of the undocumented triumphs of women's spirituality. Now, re-spected rabbi and Jungian therapist Tirzah Firestone sets out to correct the enormous error of history that has omitted the contributions of Jewish women mystics, sages, and holy women from the Jewish annals. In what might be called an act of spiritual archaeology, Firestone searches for the traces of the divine feminine in the Jewish tradition in order to answer the question, "What is a woman's way to God?" Drawing on the remarkable stories of seven historical holy women — who, despite all the obstacles, found ways to embrace the sacred feminine in their lives — Firestone teaches us the mysteries of Jewish Kabbalah from a woman's vantage point.

This groundbreaking book finally empowers women to reclaim their rightful — and historic — connection to the mystical lineage within Judaism. This is a provocative work of scholarship and passion that restores the forgotten voices of Jewish women mystics, using their remarkable journeys as a spring-board into the feminine mysteries that have been hidden from women's use for millennia. In The Receiving, these ancient teachings have finally been made available in a relevant, accessible, and life-enriching manner for women — and men — of all spiritual persuasions.

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