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1 Burnside African American Studies- Slave Narratives

This title in other editions

Mr. and Mrs. Prince: How an Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Family Moved Out of Slavery and Into Legend

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Mr. and Mrs. Prince: How an Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Family Moved Out of Slavery and Into Legend Cover

ISBN13: 9780060510732
ISBN10: 0060510730
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Merging comprehensive research and grand storytelling, Mr. and Mrs. Prince reveals the true story of a remarkable pre-Civil War African-American family, as well as the challenges that faced African-Americans who lived in the North versus the slaves who lived in the South.

Both accomplished people, Lucy Terry was a devoted wife and mother, and the first known African-American poet. Abijah Prince, her husband, was a veteran of the French and Indian Wars and an entrepreneur. Together they pursued what would become the cornerstone of the American dream — having a family and owning property where they could live, grow, and prosper. Owning land in both Vermont and Massachusetts, they were well on their way to settling in when bigoted neighbors tried to run them off. Rather than fleeing, they asserted their rights, as they would do many times, in court.

Here is a story that not only demonstrates the contours of slavery in New England but also unravels the most complete history of a pre-Civil War black family known to exist. Illuminating and inspiring, Mr. and Mrs. Prince uncovers the lives of those who could have been forgotten and brings to light a history that's intrigued but eluded many until now.

Review:

"Gerzina illuminates the deep shadows where free blacks in early New England, and elsewhere, still remain barely glimpsed....[An] often riveting first-person research report." Library Journal

Review:

"[A] meticulous and joyous...look at the Princes and the social and political landscape of enslaved and free black communities in New England." Booklist

Review:

"[A] moving...portrait of a striving family." New York Times

Review:

"History and mystery mix in this tale to make Mr. and Mrs. Prince as absorbing as it is surprising and informative." Christian Science Monitor

Synopsis:

Merging exhaustively researched history and grand storytelling, Gerzina reveals the true story of a remarkable couple whose lives contain the paradoxes of slavery in New England. Illustrated.

About the Author

Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina is the author and editor of several books, including Carrington; Black London (a New York Times notable book); Black Victorians, Black Victoriana; Frances Hodgson Burnett; and others. She is the Kathe Tappe Vernon Professor in Biography at Dartmouth College, where she also chairs the English Department, the first African-American woman to do so in the Ivy League. She has won grants from Fulbright and the National Endowment for Humanities and hosts The Book Show, a nationally syndicated weekly radio program that airs on ninety stations across the country, interviewing current authors of literary fiction, biography, and history.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

kc, May 30, 2008 (view all comments by kc)
Regarding being the 1st.....

The first recorded African American poem is 'Bar's Fight' c 1746, predating Phillis Wheatley's actual birth by 7 years. I believe the operative word in this discussion would be 'published' as opposed to 'recorded'.

Thank you for listening....
kc
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kc, May 30, 2008 (view all comments by kc)
History often requires one to measure conflicting information in order to determine exactly who is the original...or oldest...or first published...or whatever.
The following was garnered from Wikipedia, and places Lucy Terry at an earlier day than Phillis Wheatley.

Let's be liberal, and call it a tie.


Lucy Terry (c.1730-1821) is the author of the oldest known work of literature by an African American..............[main body of entry] .......Prince died in 1794. By 1803, Terry moved to nearby Sunderland. She rode on horseback annually to visit his grave until the she died in 1821.

kc
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Kimberly J., May 30, 2008 (view all comments by Kimberly J.)
I'm really curious... how is it that the writer calls Mrs. Prince the first African American poet, when that honor has always been given to Phillis Wheatley? Learned that in my first American literature course, and if you google the phrase, lots of references come up to Phillis Wheatley, and none to Mrs. Prince. Phillis dates to Colonial times.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780060510732
Subtitle:
How an Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Family Moved Out of Slavery and into Legend
Author:
Gerzina, Gretchen Holbrook
With:
Gerzina, Anthony
Author:
Gerzina, Gretchen Holbrook
Author:
by Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina
Author:
by Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina
Publisher:
Amistad
Subject:
General
Subject:
General History
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
United States - State & Local - New England
Subject:
History
Subject:
Freedmen
Subject:
Prince, Lucy Terry
Subject:
Prince, Abijah
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20080122
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.54x6.02x.97 in. .87 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Slave Narratives

Mr. and Mrs. Prince: How an Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Family Moved Out of Slavery and Into Legend Used Hardcover
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$13.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Amistad Press - English 9780060510732 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Gerzina illuminates the deep shadows where free blacks in early New England, and elsewhere, still remain barely glimpsed....[An] often riveting first-person research report."
"Review" by , "[A] meticulous and joyous...look at the Princes and the social and political landscape of enslaved and free black communities in New England."
"Review" by , "[A] moving...portrait of a striving family."
"Review" by , "History and mystery mix in this tale to make Mr. and Mrs. Prince as absorbing as it is surprising and informative."
"Synopsis" by , Merging exhaustively researched history and grand storytelling, Gerzina reveals the true story of a remarkable couple whose lives contain the paradoxes of slavery in New England. Illustrated.
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