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1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

The Known World

by

The Known World Cover

ISBN13: 9780060557546
ISBN10: 0060557540
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $7.95!

 

Awards

2004 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
2003 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction
Finalist for the 2003 National Book Award for Fiction

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Henry Townsend, a black farmer, bootmaker, and former slave, has a fondness for Paradise Lost and an unusual mentor — William Robbins, perhaps the most powerful white man in antebellum Virginia's Manchester County. Under Robbins's tutelage, Henry becomes proprietor of his own plantation — as well as of his own slaves. When he dies, his widow Caldonia succumbs to profound grief, and things begin to fall apart:slaves take to escaping under the cover of night, and families who had once found love beneath the weight of slavery begin to betray one another. Beyond the Townsend estate, the known world also unravels: low-paid white patrollers stand watch as slave "speculators" sell free black people into slavery, and rumors of slave rebellions set white families against slaves who have served them for years.

An ambitious, luminously written novel that ranges seamlessly between the past and future and back again to the present, The Known World weaves together the lives of freed and enslaved blacks, white, and Indians — and allows all of us a deeper understanding of the enduring multidimensional world created by the institution of slavery.

Review:

"[An] extraordinary novel — the best new work of American fiction to cross my desk in years." Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post

Review:

"The particulars and consequences of the 'right' of humans to own other humans are dramatized with unprecedented ingenuity and intensity..." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"A strong, intricate, daring book by a writer of deep compassion and uncommon gifts." Peter Matthiessen

Review:

"Jones has written a book of tremendous moral intricacy: no relationship here is left unaltered by the bonds of ownership, and liberty eludes most of Manchester County?s residents, not just its slaves." The New Yorker

Review:

"Jones forcefully demonstrates how institutionalized slavery jeopardized all levels of civilized society so that no one was really free. A fascinating look at a painful theme, this book is an ideal choice for book clubs." Library Journal

Review:

"With hard-won wisdom and hugely effective understatement, Mr. Jones explores the unsettling, contradiction-prone world of a Virginia slaveholder who happens to be black." Janet Maslin, The New York Times

Review:

"If Jones...keeps up this level of work, he'll equal the best ficiton Toni Morrison has written about being black in America." Speakeasy

Review:

"The particulars and consequences of the 'right' of humans to own other humans are dramatized with unprecedented ingenuity and intensity, in a harrowing tale that scarcely ever raises its voice...This will mean a great deal to a great many people. It should be a major prize contender, and it won't be forgotten." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

From National Book Award-nominated author Edward P. Jones comes a debut novel of stunning emotional depth and unequaled literary power about a black slaveowner and the travails on his plantation.

Synopsis:

Henry Townsend, a black farmer, bootmaker, and former slave, has a fondness for Paradise Lost and an unusual mentor — William Robbins, perhaps the most powerful man in antebellum Virginia's Manchester County. Under Robbins's tutelage, Henry becomes proprietor of his own plantation — as well as of his own slaves. When he dies, his widow, Caldonia, succumbs to profound grief, and things begin to fall apart at their plantation: slaves take to escaping under the cover of night, and families who had once found love beneath the weight of slavery begin to betray one another. Beyond the Townsend estate, the known world also unravels: low-paid white patrollers stand watch as slave "speculators" sell free black people into slavery, and rumors of slave rebellions set white families against slaves who have served them for years.

An ambitious, luminously written novel that ranges seamlessly between the past and future and back again to the present, The Known World weaves together the lives of freed and enslaved blacks, whites, and Indians — and allows all of us a deeper understanding of the enduring multidimensional world created by the institution of slavery.

About the Author

Edward P. Jones, the New York Times bestselling author, has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, for fiction, the National Book Critics Circle award, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and the Lannan Literary Award for The Known World; he also received a MacArthur Fellowship in 2004. His first collection of stories, Lost in the City, won the PEN/Hemingway Award and was short listed for the National Book Award. His second collection, All Aunt Hagars Children, was a finalist for the Pen/Faulkner Award. He has been an instructor of fiction writing at a range of universities, including Princeton. He lives in Washington, D.C.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

christi, December 4, 2006 (view all comments by christi)
If you're a fan of Toni Morrison's Beloved, Song of Solomon or Zora Neal Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, you will love this book. The writing is superb; the characters and story are as urgent as the day's news and stay with you like a photo album of unknown, but still familiar, relatives. Edward P. Jones desrves the Pulitzer.
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(17 of 32 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060557546
Author:
Jones, Edward P
Publisher:
Amistad
Author:
Jones, Edward P.
Author:
by Edward P. Jones
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Virginia
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Slaves
Subject:
Plantation life
Subject:
African American slaveholders
Subject:
African American plantation owners
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
107-261
Publication Date:
20030814
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 9 x 0.25 in 11.92 oz
Age Level:
from 10

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Pulitzer Prize Winners
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Known World Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Amistad Press - English 9780060557546 Reviews:
"Review" by , "[An] extraordinary novel — the best new work of American fiction to cross my desk in years."
"Review" by , "The particulars and consequences of the 'right' of humans to own other humans are dramatized with unprecedented ingenuity and intensity..."
"Review" by , "A strong, intricate, daring book by a writer of deep compassion and uncommon gifts."
"Review" by , "Jones has written a book of tremendous moral intricacy: no relationship here is left unaltered by the bonds of ownership, and liberty eludes most of Manchester County?s residents, not just its slaves."
"Review" by , "Jones forcefully demonstrates how institutionalized slavery jeopardized all levels of civilized society so that no one was really free. A fascinating look at a painful theme, this book is an ideal choice for book clubs."
"Review" by , "With hard-won wisdom and hugely effective understatement, Mr. Jones explores the unsettling, contradiction-prone world of a Virginia slaveholder who happens to be black."
"Review" by , "If Jones...keeps up this level of work, he'll equal the best ficiton Toni Morrison has written about being black in America."
"Review" by , "The particulars and consequences of the 'right' of humans to own other humans are dramatized with unprecedented ingenuity and intensity, in a harrowing tale that scarcely ever raises its voice...This will mean a great deal to a great many people. It should be a major prize contender, and it won't be forgotten."
"Synopsis" by , From National Book Award-nominated author Edward P. Jones comes a debut novel of stunning emotional depth and unequaled literary power about a black slaveowner and the travails on his plantation.
"Synopsis" by , Henry Townsend, a black farmer, bootmaker, and former slave, has a fondness for Paradise Lost and an unusual mentor — William Robbins, perhaps the most powerful man in antebellum Virginia's Manchester County. Under Robbins's tutelage, Henry becomes proprietor of his own plantation — as well as of his own slaves. When he dies, his widow, Caldonia, succumbs to profound grief, and things begin to fall apart at their plantation: slaves take to escaping under the cover of night, and families who had once found love beneath the weight of slavery begin to betray one another. Beyond the Townsend estate, the known world also unravels: low-paid white patrollers stand watch as slave "speculators" sell free black people into slavery, and rumors of slave rebellions set white families against slaves who have served them for years.

An ambitious, luminously written novel that ranges seamlessly between the past and future and back again to the present, The Known World weaves together the lives of freed and enslaved blacks, whites, and Indians — and allows all of us a deeper understanding of the enduring multidimensional world created by the institution of slavery.

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