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This title in other editions

When the Women Come Out to Dance: Stories

by

When the Women Come Out to Dance: Stories Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Elmore Leonard, a literary icon praised by The New York Times Book Review as "the greatest crime writer of our time, perhaps ever," has captured the imagination of millions of readers with his more than three dozen books.

In this short fiction collection, Leonard demonstrates the superb characterizations, dead-on dialogue, vivid atmosphere, and driving plots that have made him a household name — and once again illustrates that the line between the law and the lawbreakers is not as firm as we might think.

Federal marshal Karen Sisco, from the bestselling novel Out of Sight, returns in "Karen Makes Out," once again inadvertently mixing pleasure with business. In "Fire in the Hole," Raylan Givens, last seen in Riding the Rap and Pronto, meets up with an old friend, but they're now on different sides of the law. In the title story, "When the Women Come Out to Dance," Mrs. Mahmood gets more than she bargains for when she conspires with her maid to end her unhappy marriage.

All nine stories are Elmore Leonard at his vivid, hilarious, and unfailingly human best.

Review:

"In terms of flawless craft and, more important, in terms of pleasure, When the Women Come Out to Dance is top-notch work from one of our most gifted and consistently entertaining writers." Charles Taylor, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"If Leonard were a new kid instead of a past master, this fiction collection would make his name." People

Review:

"The way some novelists write short stories, you might worry his would be Leonard Lite, but in fact they're more like Leonard Concentrate — the usual vivid characters, wry dialogue and plot twists, vacuum-sealed in a smaller jar." Detroit News

Review:

"No living writer in America can evoke so much using so little....His newest collection of short stories will thrill both fans and the uninitiated." Business Week

Review:

"[Leonard] can invent coolheaded characters who leap off the page, equip them with pricelessly terse dialogue and dream up the kinds of plots that might have worked for O. Henry, if O. Henry had had a serious interest in lowlife, double-crossing, and crime." Janet Maslin, New York Times

Review:

"Leonard's prose is a delivery system honed to bring fans quick hits of pleasure. The effect of this, his thirty-ninth book, is to leave you a little high and definitely addicted to the author all over again." New York Daily News

Review:

"Other writers have to downshift to write a short story. Leonard's not-one-word-wasted style doesn't have to be changed a lick. His craftsmanship is such that many readers won't even notice it — which is the highest compliment one can pay." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"[H]ighly original premises and fresh, three-dimensional characters....But perhaps Leonard's greatest accomplishment is in transforming a notoriously underread form — the short story — into something with mass appeal." Keir Graff, Booklist

Review:

"Fresh evidence why it's a mistake to pigeonhole Leonard as a writer of westerns or crime novels. Like his mentor, John D. McDonald, the man's interested in everybody who relishes a good fight, whether it's with sharp-tongued words or shotguns." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"[L]ongtime aficionados will relish the desperate men, heat-packing dames, and punchy dialogue that Leonard can deliver in his sleep. It might just be enough to tide you over till he reloads with a full clip." Ben Goldstein, Maxim Online

Review:

"Leonard fans may wish for something meatier, but the razor-edged dialogue and brisk storytelling won't disappoint." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Elmore Leonard's...most accomplished female characters in years." USA Today

Synopsis:

Driven by terrific characters and superb writing, these short pieces (including two novella-length works) are Elmore Leonard at his economical best.

Synopsis:

Elmore Leonard, a literary icon praised by The New York Times Book Review as "the greatest crime writer of our time, perhaps ever," has captured the imagination of millions of readers with his more than three dozen books.

In this short fiction collection, Leonard demonstrates the superb characterizations, dead-on dialogue, vivid atmosphere, and driving plots that have made him a household name — and once again illustrates that the line between the law and the lawbreakers is not as firm as we might think.

Federal marshal Karen Sisco, from the bestselling novel Out of Sight, returns in "Karen Makes Out," once again inadvertently mixing pleasure with business. In "Fire in the Hole," Raylan Givens, last seen in Riding the Rap and Pronto, meets up with an old friend, but they're now on different sides of the law. In the title story, "When the Women Come Out to Dance," Mrs. Mahmood gets more than she bargains for when she conspires with her maid to end her unhappy marriage.

All nine stories are Elmore Leonard at his vivid, hilarious, and unfailingly human best.

About the Author

Elmore Leonard has written more than forty books during his highly successful writing career, including the bestsellers Road Dogs, Up in Honey's Room, The Hot Kid, Mr. Paradise, Tishomingo Blues, and the critically acclaimed collection of short stories When the Women Come Out to Dance. Many of his books have been made into movies, including Get Shorty, Out of Sight, and Be Cool. Justified, the hit series from FX, is based on Leonard's character Raylan Givens, who appears in Riding the Rap, Pronto, the short story "Fire in the Hole," and Raylan. Leonard is the recipient of the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the Lifetime Achievement Award from PEN USA, and the Grand Master Award of the Mystery Writers of America. He lives in Bloomfield Village, Michigan.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060586164
Author:
Leonard, Elmore
Publisher:
William Morrow & Company
Author:
by Elmore Leonard
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Short Stories
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Mystery-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
January 6, 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7.99x5.26x.59 in. .41 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z

When the Women Come Out to Dance: Stories Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Dark Alley - English 9780060586164 Reviews:
"Review" by , "In terms of flawless craft and, more important, in terms of pleasure, When the Women Come Out to Dance is top-notch work from one of our most gifted and consistently entertaining writers."
"Review" by , "If Leonard were a new kid instead of a past master, this fiction collection would make his name."
"Review" by , "The way some novelists write short stories, you might worry his would be Leonard Lite, but in fact they're more like Leonard Concentrate — the usual vivid characters, wry dialogue and plot twists, vacuum-sealed in a smaller jar."
"Review" by , "No living writer in America can evoke so much using so little....His newest collection of short stories will thrill both fans and the uninitiated."
"Review" by , "[Leonard] can invent coolheaded characters who leap off the page, equip them with pricelessly terse dialogue and dream up the kinds of plots that might have worked for O. Henry, if O. Henry had had a serious interest in lowlife, double-crossing, and crime."
"Review" by , "Leonard's prose is a delivery system honed to bring fans quick hits of pleasure. The effect of this, his thirty-ninth book, is to leave you a little high and definitely addicted to the author all over again."
"Review" by , "Other writers have to downshift to write a short story. Leonard's not-one-word-wasted style doesn't have to be changed a lick. His craftsmanship is such that many readers won't even notice it — which is the highest compliment one can pay."
"Review" by , "[H]ighly original premises and fresh, three-dimensional characters....But perhaps Leonard's greatest accomplishment is in transforming a notoriously underread form — the short story — into something with mass appeal."
"Review" by , "Fresh evidence why it's a mistake to pigeonhole Leonard as a writer of westerns or crime novels. Like his mentor, John D. McDonald, the man's interested in everybody who relishes a good fight, whether it's with sharp-tongued words or shotguns." Kirkus Reviews
"Review" by , "[L]ongtime aficionados will relish the desperate men, heat-packing dames, and punchy dialogue that Leonard can deliver in his sleep. It might just be enough to tide you over till he reloads with a full clip."
"Review" by , "Leonard fans may wish for something meatier, but the razor-edged dialogue and brisk storytelling won't disappoint."
"Review" by , "Elmore Leonard's...most accomplished female characters in years."
"Synopsis" by , Driven by terrific characters and superb writing, these short pieces (including two novella-length works) are Elmore Leonard at his economical best.
"Synopsis" by , Elmore Leonard, a literary icon praised by The New York Times Book Review as "the greatest crime writer of our time, perhaps ever," has captured the imagination of millions of readers with his more than three dozen books.

In this short fiction collection, Leonard demonstrates the superb characterizations, dead-on dialogue, vivid atmosphere, and driving plots that have made him a household name — and once again illustrates that the line between the law and the lawbreakers is not as firm as we might think.

Federal marshal Karen Sisco, from the bestselling novel Out of Sight, returns in "Karen Makes Out," once again inadvertently mixing pleasure with business. In "Fire in the Hole," Raylan Givens, last seen in Riding the Rap and Pronto, meets up with an old friend, but they're now on different sides of the law. In the title story, "When the Women Come Out to Dance," Mrs. Mahmood gets more than she bargains for when she conspires with her maid to end her unhappy marriage.

All nine stories are Elmore Leonard at his vivid, hilarious, and unfailingly human best.

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