Books for your bucks
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | June 15, 2015

    Matthew Quick: IMG Portia Kane's '80s Metal Mix



    Two of Love May Fail's main characters, Portia Kane and Chuck Bass — now in their early 40s — still love the metal music that was... Continue »
    1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Love May Fail

      Matthew Quick 9780062285560

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$10.50
List price: $14.99
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Beaverton Religion Western- Bible History and Criticism
2 Burnside Christianity- New Testament General
2 Hawthorne Christianity- Biblical Reference

Other titles in the Plus series:

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

by

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[A] fascinating account of New Testament textual criticism....For believer or atheist, I recommend Misquoting Jesus to anyone with an interest in where this ancient anthology that has helped shape our culture came from." Doug Brown, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For almost 1,500 years, the New Testament manuscripts were copied by hand — and mistakes and intentional changes abound in the competing manuscript versions. Religious and biblical scholar Bart Ehrman makes the provocative case that many of our widely held beliefs concerning the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity, and the divine origins of the Bible itself are the results of both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes.

In this compelling and fascinating book, Ehrman shows where and why changes were made in our earliest surviving manuscripts, explaining for the first time how the many variations of our cherished biblical stories came to be, and why only certain versions of the stories qualify for publication in the Bibles we read today. Ehrman frames his account with personal reflections on how his study of the Greek manuscripts made him abandon his once ultra–conservative views of the Bible.

Review:

"In the absence of any original manuscripts of the books of the New Testament, how can we be sure that we're getting the intended words and meaning? Ehrman, professor of religion at UNC-Chapel Hill, has devoted his life to the study of such questions and here offers an engaging and fascinating look at the way scholars try to answer them. Part memoir, part history and part critical study, he traces the development of the academic discipline called textual criticism, which uses external and internal evidence to evaluate and compare ancient manuscripts in order to find the best readings. Ehrman points out that scribes altered almost all of the manuscripts we now have. In the early days of the Christian movement, scribal error often arose simply from unintentional omissions of words or lines. As Christianity evolved into an official religion under Constantine, however, scribes often added material to existing manuscripts or altered them to provide scriptural support for Christian doctrine or to enforce specific views about women, Jews or pagans. Ehrman's absorbing story, fresh and lively prose and seasoned insights into the challenges of recreating the texts of the New Testament ensure that readers might never read the Gospels or Paul's letters the same way again." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Although he addresses a popular audience, [Ehrman] undercuts the very religious attitudes that have made the Bible a popular book. Still, this is a useful overview for biblical history collections." Booklist

Review:

"Offers a fascinating look into the field of textual criticism and evidence that Scriptures have been altered." Charleston Post & Courier

Review:

"Whichever side you sit on regarding Biblical inerrancy, this is a rewarding read." Dallas Morning News

Review:

"[An] accessible lay introduction to New Testament textual criticism....Recommended." Library Journal

Synopsis:

Now in paperback, this New York Times bestseller explores the mistakes and changes that ancient copyists made to the New Testament that greatly impacted the Bible used today.

Synopsis:

The author of Lost Christianities reveals how ancient scribes erroneously or deliberately changed New Testament stories in the face of period cultural, theological, and political disputes, explaining how numerous Christian beliefs are based on altered texts.

Synopsis:

A religious scholar and former evangelical Christian explores the history of the Bible, from the ancient Hebrew scrolls that Jesus read to the big business of Bible publishing today, debunking the myth of the Bible's infallibility and revealing a richer and more authentic way to read it.

Synopsis:

“Personal and accessible . . . The Rise and Fall of the Bible is Beals attempt to shatter this popular understanding of the Bible as a combination of divine instruction manual and self-help book.”—Adam Kirsch, Tablet

In this revelatory exploration, a noted religion scholar and former evangelical Christian takes us back to early Christianity to ask how a box of handwritten scrolls became the Bible, and forward to see how the multibillion-dollar business that has brought us Biblezines and manga Bibles is selling down the Bibles sacred capital. Among his surprising insights:

*Christianity thrived for centuries without any Bible. Early congregations used collections of scrolls; there was no official canon of scriptures and no book existed that was big enough to hold them.

*The idea of the Bible as the literal Word of God is only about a century old.

*There is no “original” Bible behind the thousands of Bibles on the market today. The further back we go in the Bibles history, the more versions we find.

In The Rise and Fall of the Bible Beal offers a chance to rediscover a Bible, and a faith, that is truer to its own history—not a book of answers but a library of questions.

“Part autobiography, part social scientific research, part shrewd discernment, and part theological interpretation—Tim Beal has written a zinger of a book about the cultural history of the Bible. This welcome and important book will cause a pause before we make glib claims for ‘the Word of the Lord.” —Walter Brueggemann

“Beal . . . makes a compelling case against the idea of a fully consistent and unerring book, positing instead a very human volume with all the twists and foibles of the human experience, truly reflecting that human experience. He presents a convincing case for a radical rereading of the text, an honest appreciation of this sacred book. An engrossing and excellent work, highly recommended.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

About the Author

Bart D. Ehrman chairs the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an authority on the history of the New Testament, the early church, and the life of Jesus. He has taped several highly popular lecture series for the Teaching Company and is the author of Lost Christianities: The Battles for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew and Lost Scriptures: Books that Did Not Make It into the New Testament. He lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Table of Contents

Contents 1. The End of the Word as We Know It:

A Personal Introduction   1 Magic 8 Ball Bible   2 The Rise of a Cultural Icon   5 The Way of Salvation   12 So Long, Judas   18 The Course of This Book   21 My Utmost, Revisited   24 2. The Greatest Story Ever Sold   29 Sodom and Gomorrah Equals Love   30 Biblical Consumerism   32 Expectations of Biblical Proportions   36 By Whose Authority?   38 3. Biblical Values   41 Felt Needs   44 Values Added   48 Finding Your Niche   50 Necessary Supplements   54 If Thats What It Means, Why Doesnt It Say So?   58 Manga Bibles   64 A Different Cookie   68 4. Twilight of the Idol   70 The Evangelical Dilemma   70 Selling Out   72 Types Setting   78 Distress Crop   80 Behold Your God   83 5. What Would Jesus Read?   85 Jesus Sings   86 Christianity Before the Bible   96 No Original   102 No Canon   106 Early Christian Network Society   108 6. The Story of the Good Book   111 Remembering Whats Lost   111 Scrolling Down to the Book   113 Scattered Throughout the Whole World   117 After Gutenberg   120 Multiplying the Leaves   129 Lost in Translations   140 Not a Rock but a River   143 7. Library of Questions   146 Mark Twains Drugstore   155 Letting Suffering Speak   160 Trials of God   163 Weak Rope Theory   168 Is the Bible a Failure?   171 Faith in Ambiguity   173 Nothing but a Burning Light   176 The Bible by the Side of the Road   178 8. And I Feel Fine   180 Cracking the Binding   184 Loose Canon   187 Back to the Future   189 Living Conversations   191 Seeds to Go Around   193 Word Without End   196 Acknowledgments   197 Notes   200 Index   226

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

llibrariann, August 6, 2007 (view all comments by llibrariann)
Oh, great, another excuse to tear out more pages of the Manual. One look at our changing cultural mores would indicate we need every good foundation we have. But that's OK. This much-maligned Book has already told us this would happen and what the results would be. "Even so, come, Lord Jesus." ( Some of It's last words on the subject)
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 56 readers found this comment helpful)
mcleajc, July 29, 2007 (view all comments by mcleajc)
This is a fascinating book, I found it hard to put down. Dr Ehrman is very methodical and gives much needed background to lay people trying to understand the process of putting the New Testament together and the editing that has resulted over the course of time and the course of politics. Many would like to think that God took over the printing presses and out popped the Bible - but that is far from the truth. And the truth is far more fascinating especially as older documents have come to light and into the hands of scholars who can interpret them. I found this to be fair and not overly emotional - with some books you can tell the author has an ax to grind - Dr Ehrman does a great job explaining how the New Testament came to be, how it's been transcribed for hundreds of years, how and why things have been added, even how scholars KNOW they've been added or changed and finally - whether or not those changes actually make a difference in our understanding of Jesus and Christianity. For anyone who wants an understanding of New Testament writings this is a must read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(21 of 25 readers found this comment helpful)
ArchiesBoy, July 15, 2007 (view all comments by ArchiesBoy)
I knew all that before, but it's good to see it in print yet again, and it's good to know this book is out there fighting the good fight, especially these days.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(16 of 29 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060859510
Author:
Ehrman, Bart D.
Publisher:
HarperOne
Author:
by Bart Ehrman
Author:
Beal, Timothy
Author:
Ehrman, Bart
Subject:
General
Subject:
Bible - Criticism Interpretation - General
Subject:
Christianity - General
Subject:
Christianity - History - General
Subject:
Biblical Criticism & Interpretation - General
Subject:
General Religion
Subject:
Christianity-Biblical Criticism
Subject:
Christianity
Subject:
Bible - Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series:
Plus
Publication Date:
February 2007
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.02x5.38x.65 in. .45 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. A History of God: The 4000-Year... Used Trade Paper $6.50
  2. The Jesus Papers: Exposing the...
    Used Hardcover $1.95
  3. Walking the Bible: A Journey by Land... Used Trade Paper $4.95
  4. The Great Transformation: The... Used Trade Paper $7.95
  5. What Paul Meant (06 Edition) Used Hardcover $13.00
  6. The Lost Gospel: The Quest for the... Used Hardcover $6.95

Related Subjects

Humanities » Philosophy » General
Religion » Christianity » Bibles » History and Criticism
Religion » Christianity » Biblical Reference » Criticism
Religion » Christianity » Biblical Reference » General
Religion » Christianity » Church History » General
Religion » Christianity » General
Religion » Christianity » New Testament » General

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Harper San Francisco - English 9780060859510 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In the absence of any original manuscripts of the books of the New Testament, how can we be sure that we're getting the intended words and meaning? Ehrman, professor of religion at UNC-Chapel Hill, has devoted his life to the study of such questions and here offers an engaging and fascinating look at the way scholars try to answer them. Part memoir, part history and part critical study, he traces the development of the academic discipline called textual criticism, which uses external and internal evidence to evaluate and compare ancient manuscripts in order to find the best readings. Ehrman points out that scribes altered almost all of the manuscripts we now have. In the early days of the Christian movement, scribal error often arose simply from unintentional omissions of words or lines. As Christianity evolved into an official religion under Constantine, however, scribes often added material to existing manuscripts or altered them to provide scriptural support for Christian doctrine or to enforce specific views about women, Jews or pagans. Ehrman's absorbing story, fresh and lively prose and seasoned insights into the challenges of recreating the texts of the New Testament ensure that readers might never read the Gospels or Paul's letters the same way again." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[A] fascinating account of New Testament textual criticism....For believer or atheist, I recommend Misquoting Jesus to anyone with an interest in where this ancient anthology that has helped shape our culture came from." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "Although he addresses a popular audience, [Ehrman] undercuts the very religious attitudes that have made the Bible a popular book. Still, this is a useful overview for biblical history collections."
"Review" by , "Offers a fascinating look into the field of textual criticism and evidence that Scriptures have been altered."
"Review" by , "Whichever side you sit on regarding Biblical inerrancy, this is a rewarding read."
"Review" by , "[An] accessible lay introduction to New Testament textual criticism....Recommended."
"Synopsis" by , Now in paperback, this New York Times bestseller explores the mistakes and changes that ancient copyists made to the New Testament that greatly impacted the Bible used today.
"Synopsis" by , The author of Lost Christianities reveals how ancient scribes erroneously or deliberately changed New Testament stories in the face of period cultural, theological, and political disputes, explaining how numerous Christian beliefs are based on altered texts.
"Synopsis" by ,
A religious scholar and former evangelical Christian explores the history of the Bible, from the ancient Hebrew scrolls that Jesus read to the big business of Bible publishing today, debunking the myth of the Bible's infallibility and revealing a richer and more authentic way to read it.
"Synopsis" by , “Personal and accessible . . . The Rise and Fall of the Bible is Beals attempt to shatter this popular understanding of the Bible as a combination of divine instruction manual and self-help book.”—Adam Kirsch, Tablet

In this revelatory exploration, a noted religion scholar and former evangelical Christian takes us back to early Christianity to ask how a box of handwritten scrolls became the Bible, and forward to see how the multibillion-dollar business that has brought us Biblezines and manga Bibles is selling down the Bibles sacred capital. Among his surprising insights:

*Christianity thrived for centuries without any Bible. Early congregations used collections of scrolls; there was no official canon of scriptures and no book existed that was big enough to hold them.

*The idea of the Bible as the literal Word of God is only about a century old.

*There is no “original” Bible behind the thousands of Bibles on the market today. The further back we go in the Bibles history, the more versions we find.

In The Rise and Fall of the Bible Beal offers a chance to rediscover a Bible, and a faith, that is truer to its own history—not a book of answers but a library of questions.

“Part autobiography, part social scientific research, part shrewd discernment, and part theological interpretation—Tim Beal has written a zinger of a book about the cultural history of the Bible. This welcome and important book will cause a pause before we make glib claims for ‘the Word of the Lord.” —Walter Brueggemann

“Beal . . . makes a compelling case against the idea of a fully consistent and unerring book, positing instead a very human volume with all the twists and foibles of the human experience, truly reflecting that human experience. He presents a convincing case for a radical rereading of the text, an honest appreciation of this sacred book. An engrossing and excellent work, highly recommended.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.