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Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters

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Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

From Powells.com:

Matt Ridley's Genome is one of the best, and most popular, works of popular science of recent years, in line with such instant classics as Richard Rhodes's The Making of the Atomic Bomb or Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe. Ever since James Watson and Francis Crick first determined the molecular structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the early sixties – one of the greatest discoveries in the history of science – the race to unravel and map the human genome has been one of the most dramatic stories of our time. Our newfound understanding of genetic code is transforming, at a rate unprecedented in human history, the way we understand almost every human endeavor: religion, medicine, philosophy, physics, agrigulture, biology, and (O. J. aside) criminology, to name just a few. And this revolution in the way we live our lives and relate to the world we live in is still in its very early stages. Written just before the initial findings of the landmark Human Genome Project were released in June of 2000, Genome remains the best single introduction on what these findings – which will be released in full in 2003 – mean to us now, and what they may mean in the future. In Ridley's hands, this story is also a fascinating and illuminating discourse on what it means to be a human being and to be alive at this definitive point in our history. Martin, Powells.com

Publisher Comments:

CHROMOSOME 1LifeAll forms that perish other forms supply' (By turns we catch the vital breath and die) Like bubbles on the sea of matter borne' They rise' they break' and to that sea return."Alexander Pope," An Essay on Man

In the beginning was the word. The word proselytised the sea with its message, copying itself unceasingly and forever. The word discovered how to rearrange chemicals so as to capture little eddies in the stream of entropy and make them live. The word transformed the land surface of the planet from a dusty hell to a verdant paradise. The word eventually blossomed and became sufficiently ingenious to build a porridgy contraption called a human brain that could discover and be aware of the word itself.

My porridgy contraption boggles every time I think this thought. In four thousand million years of earth history' I am lucky enough to be alive today. In five million species, I was fortunate enough to be born a conscious human being. Among six thousand million people on the planet, I was privileged enough to be born in the country where the word was discovered. In all of the earth's history, biology and geography, I was born just five years after the moment when, and just two hundred miles from the place where, two members of my own species discovered the structure of DNA and hence uncovered the greatest, simplest and most surprising secret in the universe. Mock my zeal if you wish; consider me a ridiculous materialist for investing such enthusiasm in an acronym. But follow me on a journey back to the very origin of life, and I hope I can convince you of the immense fascination of the word.

'As the earth and ocean were probably peopled with vegetable productionslong before the existence of animals; and many families of these animals long before other families of them, shall we conjecture that one and the same kind of living filaments is and has been the cause of all organic life? asked the polymathic poet and physician Erasmus Darwin in 1794. It was a startling guess for the time' not only in its bold conjecture that all organic life shared the same origin, sixty-five years before his grandson Charles' book on the topic, but for its weird use of the word 'filaments'. The secret of life is indeed a thread.

Yet how can a filament make something live? Life is a slippery thing to define, but it consists of two very different skills: the ability to replicate' and the ability to create order. Living things produce approximate copies of themselves: rabbits produce rabbits, dandelions make dandelions. But rabbits do more than that. They eat grass' transform it into rabbit flesh and somehow build bodies of order and complexity from the random chaos of the world. They do not defy the second law of thermodynamics, which says that in a closed system everything tends from order towards disorder, because rabbits are not closed systems. Rabbits build packets of order and complexity called bodies but at the cost of expending large amounts of energy. In Erwin Schrodinger's phrase, living creatures 'drink orderliness' from the environment.

The key to both of these features of life is information. The ability to replicate is made possible by the existence of a recipe' the information that is needed to create a new body. A rabbit's egg carries the instructions for assembling a new rabbit. But the ability to create order through metabolism also depends oninformation — the instructions for building and maintaining the equipment that creates the order. An adult rabbit, with its ability to both reproduce and metabolise, is prefigured and presupposed in its living filaments in the same way that a cake is prefigured and presupposed in its recipe. This is an idea that goes right back to Aristotle, who said that the 'concept' of a chicken is implicit in an egg, or that an acorn was literally 'informed' by the plan of an oak tree. When Aristotle's dim perception of information theory, buried under generations of chemistry and physics, re-emerged amid the discoveries of modern genetics' Max Delbruck joked that the Greek sage should be given a posthumous Nobel prize for the discovery of DNA.

The filament of DNA is information, a message written in a code of chemicals' one chemical for each letter. It is almost too good to be true' but the code turns out to be written in a way that we can understand. just like written English, the genetic code is a linear language, written in a straight line. just like written English' it is digital, in that every letter bears the same importance. Moreover' the language of DNA is considerably simpler than English, since it has an alphabet of only four letters, conventionally known as A, C, G and T.

Now that we know that genes are coded recipes, it is hard to recall how few people even guessed such a possibility. For the first half of the twentieth century, one question reverberated unanswered through biology: what is a gene? It seemed almost impossibly mysterious. Go back not to 19 5 3' the year of the discovery of DNA's symmetrical structure, but ten years further, to 1943. Those who will do most to crackthe mystery' a whole decade later, are working on other things in 1943. Francis Crick is working on the design of naval mines near Portsmouth. At the same time James Watson is just enrolling as an undergraduate at the precocious age of fifteen at the University of Chicago; he is determined to devote his life to ornithology. Maurice Wilkins is helping to design the atom bomb in the United States. Rosalind Franklin is studying the structure of coal for the British government.

In Auschwitz in 1943, Josef Mengele is torturing twins to death in a grotesque parody of scientific inquiry.

Synopsis:

"A fascinating tour of the human genome. . . . If you want to catch a glimpse of the biotech century that is now dawning, and how it will make life better for all of us, "Genome" is an excellent start".--"Wall Street Journal". Includes a new Foreword by the author. NPR sponsorships.

Synopsis:

The genome's been mapped. But what does it mean?

Arguably the most significant scientific discoveru of the new century, the mapping of the twenty-three pairs of chromosomes that make up the human genome raises almost as many questions as it answers. Questions that will profoundly impact the way we think about disease, about longevity, and about free will. Questions that will affect the rest of your life.

Genome offers extraordinary insight into the ramifications of this incredible breakthrough. By picking one newly discovered gene from each pair of chromosomes and telling its story, Matt Ridley recounts the history of our species and its ancestors from the dawn of life to the brink of future medicine. From Huntington's disease to cancer, from the applications of gene therapy to the horrors of eugenics, Matt Ridley probes the scientific, philosophical, and moral issues arising as a result of the mapping of the genome. It will help you understand what this scientific milestone means for you, for your children, and for humankind.

About the Author

Matt Ridley's books have been shortlisted for six literary awards. He has been a scientist, a journalist, and a national newspaper columnist, and is currently chairman of the International Centre for Life, in Newcastle, England. He is also a visiting professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060932909
Subtitle:
The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters
Author:
Ridley, Matt
Publisher:
Harper Perennial
Subject:
General
Subject:
Popular works
Subject:
Genetics
Subject:
Human Physiology
Subject:
Human genetics
Subject:
Human genome
Subject:
Biotechnology
Subject:
Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics
Subject:
Life Sciences - Human Anatomy & Physiology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
20001003
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.02x5.38x.81 in. .61 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Genetics
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Genetics

Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters Used Trade Paper
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Product details 352 pages Harper Perennial - English 9780060932909 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "A fascinating tour of the human genome. . . . If you want to catch a glimpse of the biotech century that is now dawning, and how it will make life better for all of us, "Genome" is an excellent start".--"Wall Street Journal". Includes a new Foreword by the author. NPR sponsorships.
"Synopsis" by ,

The genome's been mapped. But what does it mean?

Arguably the most significant scientific discoveru of the new century, the mapping of the twenty-three pairs of chromosomes that make up the human genome raises almost as many questions as it answers. Questions that will profoundly impact the way we think about disease, about longevity, and about free will. Questions that will affect the rest of your life.

Genome offers extraordinary insight into the ramifications of this incredible breakthrough. By picking one newly discovered gene from each pair of chromosomes and telling its story, Matt Ridley recounts the history of our species and its ancestors from the dawn of life to the brink of future medicine. From Huntington's disease to cancer, from the applications of gene therapy to the horrors of eugenics, Matt Ridley probes the scientific, philosophical, and moral issues arising as a result of the mapping of the genome. It will help you understand what this scientific milestone means for you, for your children, and for humankind.

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