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A King's Ransom

A King's Ransom Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One

Some called it a crown jewel. Others said it was a diamond in the rough, with the emphasis on rough. It was a matter of perspective, whether Cartagena stood apart from the violence that besieged Colombia or was shrinking in its shadow.

It was one of the Caribbean's most striking port cities, a special blend of colonial heritage, natural beauty, and "salsa into the wee hours. The top attraction was the old town, a city within the city, surrounded by nearly six miles of impressive fortress walls that were built under four centuries of Spanish reign. There were smaller marvels too, like "cazuela de mariscos, a local seafood soup with chunks of cassava instead of potatoes — "deliciosa! The crowded beaches on the Bocagrande peninsula weren't spectacular, but white sand and turquoise seas were close enough at Playa Blanca or, even better, Islas del Rosario. Throughout the city, colonial mansions painted in pastels and electric blue stood as reminders that the overall feeling here was decidedly tropical, in no small part Afro-Caribbean. Glorified by countless artists and writers over the centuries, Cartagena continued to evoke romantic sentiments as a unique place that, despite the influx of luxury condos, managed to retain the feel of Old San Juan and Havana in its heyday. It was, after all, the official "sister city" to beautiful Coral Gables, Florida.

Yet behind the exotic intrigue, beyond the hopeful hype of tourist agents, lurked an element of danger that was a fact of life in modern-day Colombia. Especially for an American.

Matthew Rey had visited Colombia before and was aware of the tragic headlines. Eleven sport fishermen kidnapped on their boat offBarranquilla. Busloads of children commandeered on their way to school in OcaÑ a, north of BogotÁ . More than a hundred churchgoers taken at gunpoint in the middle of a Catholic mass in Cali. As a businessman, Matthew didn't deny the risks of a country besieged by four decades of civil war. As a fisherman, he savored the natural beauty, albeit from a half mile offshore.

Matthew was in the commercial fishing business, which was big business indeed. He'd started his company in Miami with a rusted but trusted old lobster boat and a mountain of debt. Twenty years later he was part owner of Rey's Seafood Company with forty boats and two processing plants in Nicaragua. With the United States importing more than eighteen million pounds of edible fish "weekly from Central and South America, he was always looking for new equipment, opportunities for expansion.

It was that kind of thinking that had brought him to Colombia.

"Hector!" he shouted.

He got no reply. He tried again, louder. "Hector!"

Hector DÍ az was one of six Nicaraguan crewmen that Matthew had brought to Cartagena to overhaul three old shrimp boats and bring them back to the Mosquito Coast. They were the "NiÑ a, the "Pinta, and the "Coco Loco. It was just a hunch, but something told Matthew they weren't originally a set. All three were anchored side by side in the bay like a pontoon bridge, close enough together for the workers to step from one to the next. A noisy generator on the "Pinta, the middle boat, powered the working lights and welding tools for all three, making it impossible for Matthew to be heard from one boat to the next.

He switched off the generator. The lights went out, the noisestopped. It was just past sunset, but the afterglow afforded just enough natural light for the men to see each other.

"You done fixing the head yet?" asked Matthew.

Hector had been working on the plumbing all afternoon. "All but the marble tile and Kohler bidet, boss."

He was a habitual wisecracker but worth the trouble, as he and his son LivÁ n could be trusted to sail just about anything from "Punto A to "Punto B, even three old shrimp boats. Hector was half Miskito Indian, and in Matthew's book the Miskitos were the greatest fishermen on earth. For centuries their tribe had fished the Caribbean along Nicaragua's Mosquito Coast. Tall and lean, the Miskitos were natural divers, and in his prime Hector had been a top lobster diver. His skills were legendary, like the story of the time he and Matthew got lost in a blinding storm at sea. Hector promptly jumped off the boat and dived down thirty-five feet for a good look around the reef. In a matter of minutes he popped back up and told Matthew to turn the boat around and hold the course steady for about three hours. They sailed into port two hours and forty-five minutes later. Only then did Matthew fully appreciate the way the Miskitos knew their ocean — top and bottom — like their own backyard.

Matthew smiled and shouted back, joking, "You're worthless, you know that?"

"That's why I work for you, boss."

Matthew snarled, but it was just a game they played. In truth, he envied Hector. Fishing had been a long tradition in the DÍ az family, passed on from father to son for generations of Miskitos. Matthew had a son too, but not the same bond that Hector and LivÁ n shared.

The sun was gone, the orange and purpleafterglow fading. All along the rim of the bay, city lights emerged as twilight turned to darkness. Cartagena was coming to life. The parties would soon begin in earnest. The first time Matthew had visited the city, he'd ended up playing the accordion in some bar that boasted authentic "vallenato music of the local "costeÑ o people. He couldn't vouch for the music, but the one-fifty rum had delivered as promised. That was twenty years ago. Cartagena had changed much since then. He'd changed, too. Coke instead of beer and rum, and his bladder wasn't what it used to be. Just one stinking soda and already he had to break the proverbial pee seal.

Synopsis:

Just two years out of law school, Nick Rey is already on the fast track at a Miami law firm. When his father is abducted on a business trip to Colombia, guerillas demand a $3 million ransom--the exact sum Matthew's kidnap insurance policy covers. Suspecting fraud, the insurance company refuses to pay. As Nick soon learns, someone else holds the key to his father's survival.

Synopsis:

The author of five bestselling novels, including Under Cover of Darkness and The Pardon, James Grippando writes compulsively readable thrillers that could be drawn from today's headlines, only better. Now his trademark gifts are wonderfully demonstrated in a taut new tale of intrigue that will keep you guessing to the final, breathtaking scene.

Just two years out of law school, Nick Rey is on the career fast track at a hot Miami law firm when he is suddenly plunged headfirst into a dangerous bid to save his father. Matthew Rey has been kidnapped while on business in Columbia's exotic port city of Cartagena. The ransom demand of three million dollars is far more than the Rey family can ever hope to raise.

Fortunately, Matthew had purchased an insurance policy to protect against just such a threat. Unfortunately, the kidnappers seem to know all about the policy, and the insurance company, suspecting fraud, is refusing to pay out. With nowhere to turn, Nick links up with Alex, a beautiful, street-smart woman who may be the only person capable of negotiating with Matthew's abductors. But Nick soon discovers that the gravest dangers to him and his family are not the kidnappers and their guns, but the men in suits: lawyers, to be exact, at a powerful firm with something to hide, and they will stop at nothing to keep Nick from unleashing the truth.

About the Author

James Grippando is the bestselling author of Afraid of the Dark, Money to Burn, Intent to Kill, Born to Run, Last Call, Lying with Strangers, When Darkness Falls, Got the Look, Hear No Evil, Last to Die, Beyond Suspicion, A King's Ransom, Under Cover of Darkness, Found Money, The Abduction, The Informant, and The Pardon, which are enjoyed worldwide in twenty-six languages. He is also the author of Leapholes, for young adults. Grippando lives in Florida, where he was a trial lawyer for twelve years.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061097843
Author:
Grippando, James M.
Publisher:
Avon
Author:
Grippando, James
Author:
by James Grippando
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Espionage/Intrigue
Subject:
Thrillers
Subject:
Suspense fiction
Subject:
Americans
Subject:
Fishers
Subject:
Kidnapping
Subject:
Colombia
Subject:
Legal stories
Subject:
Popular Fiction-Contemporary Thrillers
Edition Description:
Mass Market PB
Series Volume:
2002-211606
Publication Date:
20021001
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
6.81x4.18x1.26 in. .48 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Contemporary Thrillers

A King's Ransom
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Product details 464 pages Avon Books - English 9780061097843 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Just two years out of law school, Nick Rey is already on the fast track at a Miami law firm. When his father is abducted on a business trip to Colombia, guerillas demand a $3 million ransom--the exact sum Matthew's kidnap insurance policy covers. Suspecting fraud, the insurance company refuses to pay. As Nick soon learns, someone else holds the key to his father's survival.

"Synopsis" by , The author of five bestselling novels, including Under Cover of Darkness and The Pardon, James Grippando writes compulsively readable thrillers that could be drawn from today's headlines, only better. Now his trademark gifts are wonderfully demonstrated in a taut new tale of intrigue that will keep you guessing to the final, breathtaking scene.

Just two years out of law school, Nick Rey is on the career fast track at a hot Miami law firm when he is suddenly plunged headfirst into a dangerous bid to save his father. Matthew Rey has been kidnapped while on business in Columbia's exotic port city of Cartagena. The ransom demand of three million dollars is far more than the Rey family can ever hope to raise.

Fortunately, Matthew had purchased an insurance policy to protect against just such a threat. Unfortunately, the kidnappers seem to know all about the policy, and the insurance company, suspecting fraud, is refusing to pay out. With nowhere to turn, Nick links up with Alex, a beautiful, street-smart woman who may be the only person capable of negotiating with Matthew's abductors. But Nick soon discovers that the gravest dangers to him and his family are not the kidnappers and their guns, but the men in suits: lawyers, to be exact, at a powerful firm with something to hide, and they will stop at nothing to keep Nick from unleashing the truth.

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