Signed Edition Sweepstakes
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

The Reserve: A Novel

by

The Reserve: A Novel Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"For all the care of its construction and clear beauty of its descriptive prose, The Reserve has a curiously cold-blooded and stagy quality, as if it were worked up from its multiple historical sources and abstract themes rather than allowed to grow from the exfoliating revelations of character." Jennifer Schuessler, The New York Review of Books (read the entire New York Review of Books review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Part love story, part murder mystery, set on the cusp of the Second World War, Russell Banks's sharp-witted and deeply engaging new novel raises dangerous questions about class, politics, art, love, and madness — and explores what happens when two powerful personalities, trapped at opposite ends of a social divide, begin to break the rules.

Twenty-nine-year-old Vanessa Cole is a wild, stunningly beautiful heiress, the adopted only child of a highly regarded New York brain surgeon and his socialite wife. Twice married, Vanessa has been scandalously linked to any number of rich and famous men. But on the night of July 4, 1936, at her parents' country home in a remote Adirondack Mountain enclave known as The Reserve, two events coincide to permanently alter the course of Vanessa's callow life: her father dies suddenly of a heart attack, and a mysteriously seductive local artist, Jordan Groves, blithely lands his Waco biplane in the pristine waters of the forbidden Upper Lake...

Jordan's reputation has preceded him; he is internationally known as much for his exploits and conquests as for his paintings themselves, and, here in the midst of the Great Depression, his leftist loyalties seem suspiciously undercut by his wealth and elite clientele. But for all his worldly swagger, Jordan is as staggered by Vanessa's beauty and charm as she is by his defiant independence. He falls easy prey to her electrifying personality, but it is not long before he discovers that the heiress carries a dark, deeply scarring family secret. Emotionally unstable from the start, and further unhinged by her father's unexpected death, Vanessa begins to spin wildly out of control, manipulating and destroying the lives of all who cross her path.

Moving from the secluded beauty of the Adirondack wilderness to the skies above war-torn Spain and Fascist Germany, The Reserve is a clever, incisive, and passionately romantic novel of suspense that adds a new dimension to this acclaimed author's extraordinary repertoire.

Review:

"Signature Reviewed by Scott Turow Like Banks's two most recent novels — Cloudsplitter, a 1998 book about the abolitionist John Brown, and The Darling, about the wages of '60s radicalism — The Reserve looks backward, this time to the 1930s. The reserve of the title is an Adirondack preserve, a membership-only sanctuary where the very rich partake of woodland leisure, hunting, fishing, dining, drinking, utterly remote from the anxiety and want that most Americans experienced in 1936. Jordan Groves, a noted artist and illustrator, makes his life literally and figuratively at the border of the property, along with his wife, Alicia, and two sons, Bear and Wolf. In a note that accompanies the advance reader's copy of the book, Banks says he was drawn back imaginatively to the world of his parents. But this novel is not merely an homage to the class-riven universe of the Depression but also to the way it was portrayed in its own time. Some plot elements nod in the direction of Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night. Much more clearly, the ghost of Ernest Hemingway, who is even an offstage character, treads the pages of The Reserve and leaves his tracks. Banks acknowledges that Jordan Groves is loosely based on the real-life Adirondacks artist, Rockwell Kent, but Groves, as Banks creates him, is a man in the Hemingway mold, whose first name seems to acknowledge Hemingway's quintessential hero, Robert Jordan in For Whom The Bell Tolls. Jordan Groves is a man's man, flying his airplane daringly around the Adirondacks and trekking the world in search of imagery and lovers. As is true of all the characters in this novel — and in Hemingway's — Groves is a person utterly without any sense of irony about himself, and thus any awareness of the degree to which he is a creature of what he claims to despise. Groves's unrecognized conflicts are forced into consciousness through the agency of Vanessa Cole, the twice-divorced adopted daughter of one of the Reserve's member families. Free of her last husband, a European nobleman whom she calls in her own mind Count No-Count, Vanessa is an alluring and determined seductress who sets her sights on Groves in the book's initial chapter. Death, adultery and homicide follow, shattering each of the would-be lovers' families. This is a vividly imagined book. It has the romantic atmosphere of those great 1930s tales in film and prose, and it speeds the reader along from its first pages. In fact, Banks talents are so large — and the novel so fundamentally engaging — that it continued to pull me in even when, in its climactic moments, I could no longer comprehend why the characters were doing what they were doing. By then, the denouement has been determined largely by the literary expectations of a bygone era where character flaws require a tragic end. Despite that, The Reserve is a pleasure well worth savoring. Scott Turow is at work on a sequel to Presumed Innocent." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Russell Banks is turning down the heat. His most recent novels — released to wide critical and popular acclaim — were fiery tales of revolution: 'Cloudsplitter' (1998) told the explosive story of abolition terrorist John Brown, and 'The Darling' (2004) raced us through the sprawling horrors of Liberia's modern-day civil war. But with 'The Reserve' Banks has narrowed his scope dramatically, returning... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"The plot gets off to a slow start, but the breathtaking scenic descriptions create a setting central to the story. As the chain of events builds to an inevitable and tragic conclusion, we are left with the feeling that no one, not even the well-to-do, can escape the laws of nature. Recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"Banks is one of America's finest novelists, but this oddly distanced work lacks the passionate personal engagement of a masterpiece like Continental Drift (1985) or the bracing historical revisionism of Cloudsplitter (1998)." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Banks' gorgeous, vivid prose feels wasted on mostly limpid characters....This ultimately reads like a fascinating setup for a grand, passionate novel that, sadly, just isn't there." Booklist

Review:

"[A] riveting narrative, featuring an almost pot-boiling love story set against a backdrop of global unrest and clearly demarcated class tensions." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[An] illuminating psychological novel of subverted love and family dysfunction, and a powerful commentary on class structure in America." Boston Globe

Review:

"Banks fulfills Hemingway's dictum that a good book is one that offers plenty for critics to admire while at the same time provides a story that engrosses ordinary readers." Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Review:

"This is a deeply moving novel, part mystery, part romance, and part social commentary. Words flow like liquid silk." Providence Journal

Review:

"Banks has written a novel in which almost all the constituent aspects are larger than life." New York Times

About the Author

Russell Banks is the founding president of Cities of Refuge North America and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His work has been translated into twenty languages and has received numerous international prizes and awards. He lives in upstate New York and is the New York State Author.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061430251
Author:
Banks, Russell
Publisher:
Harper
Author:
Banks, Russell
Author:
by Russell Banks
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
New york (state)
Subject:
Rich people
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
January 29, 2008
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.54x5.78x1.10 in. 1.01 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. People of the Book: A Novel
    Used Trade Paper $2.95
  2. Diary of a Bad Year Used Hardcover $2.50
  3. The Senator's Wife: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $2.50
  4. Beautiful Children: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $3.50
  5. Lush Life: A Novel Used Trade Paper $4.50
  6. Beginner's Greek
    Used Trade Paper $1.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books
Fiction and Poetry » Romance » General
Fiction and Poetry » Romance » Suspense

The Reserve: A Novel Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Harper - English 9780061430251 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Signature Reviewed by Scott Turow Like Banks's two most recent novels — Cloudsplitter, a 1998 book about the abolitionist John Brown, and The Darling, about the wages of '60s radicalism — The Reserve looks backward, this time to the 1930s. The reserve of the title is an Adirondack preserve, a membership-only sanctuary where the very rich partake of woodland leisure, hunting, fishing, dining, drinking, utterly remote from the anxiety and want that most Americans experienced in 1936. Jordan Groves, a noted artist and illustrator, makes his life literally and figuratively at the border of the property, along with his wife, Alicia, and two sons, Bear and Wolf. In a note that accompanies the advance reader's copy of the book, Banks says he was drawn back imaginatively to the world of his parents. But this novel is not merely an homage to the class-riven universe of the Depression but also to the way it was portrayed in its own time. Some plot elements nod in the direction of Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night. Much more clearly, the ghost of Ernest Hemingway, who is even an offstage character, treads the pages of The Reserve and leaves his tracks. Banks acknowledges that Jordan Groves is loosely based on the real-life Adirondacks artist, Rockwell Kent, but Groves, as Banks creates him, is a man in the Hemingway mold, whose first name seems to acknowledge Hemingway's quintessential hero, Robert Jordan in For Whom The Bell Tolls. Jordan Groves is a man's man, flying his airplane daringly around the Adirondacks and trekking the world in search of imagery and lovers. As is true of all the characters in this novel — and in Hemingway's — Groves is a person utterly without any sense of irony about himself, and thus any awareness of the degree to which he is a creature of what he claims to despise. Groves's unrecognized conflicts are forced into consciousness through the agency of Vanessa Cole, the twice-divorced adopted daughter of one of the Reserve's member families. Free of her last husband, a European nobleman whom she calls in her own mind Count No-Count, Vanessa is an alluring and determined seductress who sets her sights on Groves in the book's initial chapter. Death, adultery and homicide follow, shattering each of the would-be lovers' families. This is a vividly imagined book. It has the romantic atmosphere of those great 1930s tales in film and prose, and it speeds the reader along from its first pages. In fact, Banks talents are so large — and the novel so fundamentally engaging — that it continued to pull me in even when, in its climactic moments, I could no longer comprehend why the characters were doing what they were doing. By then, the denouement has been determined largely by the literary expectations of a bygone era where character flaws require a tragic end. Despite that, The Reserve is a pleasure well worth savoring. Scott Turow is at work on a sequel to Presumed Innocent." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "For all the care of its construction and clear beauty of its descriptive prose, The Reserve has a curiously cold-blooded and stagy quality, as if it were worked up from its multiple historical sources and abstract themes rather than allowed to grow from the exfoliating revelations of character." (read the entire New York Review of Books review)
"Review" by , "The plot gets off to a slow start, but the breathtaking scenic descriptions create a setting central to the story. As the chain of events builds to an inevitable and tragic conclusion, we are left with the feeling that no one, not even the well-to-do, can escape the laws of nature. Recommended."
"Review" by , "Banks is one of America's finest novelists, but this oddly distanced work lacks the passionate personal engagement of a masterpiece like Continental Drift (1985) or the bracing historical revisionism of Cloudsplitter (1998)."
"Review" by , "Banks' gorgeous, vivid prose feels wasted on mostly limpid characters....This ultimately reads like a fascinating setup for a grand, passionate novel that, sadly, just isn't there."
"Review" by , "[A] riveting narrative, featuring an almost pot-boiling love story set against a backdrop of global unrest and clearly demarcated class tensions."
"Review" by , "[An] illuminating psychological novel of subverted love and family dysfunction, and a powerful commentary on class structure in America."
"Review" by , "Banks fulfills Hemingway's dictum that a good book is one that offers plenty for critics to admire while at the same time provides a story that engrosses ordinary readers."
"Review" by , "This is a deeply moving novel, part mystery, part romance, and part social commentary. Words flow like liquid silk."
"Review" by , "Banks has written a novel in which almost all the constituent aspects are larger than life."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.