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Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture

by

Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The acclaimed author of the groundbreaking bestseller Schoolgirls reveals the dark side of pink and pretty: the rise of the girlie-girl, she warns, is not that innocent.

Pink and pretty or predatory and hardened, sexualized girlhood influences our daughters from infancy onward, telling them that how a girl looks matters more than who she is. Somewhere between the exhilarating rise of Girl Power in the 1990s and today, the pursuit of physical perfection has been recast as a source — the source — of female empowerment. And commercialization has spread the message faster and farther, reaching girls at ever-younger ages.

But, realistically, how many times can you say no when your daughter begs for a pint-size wedding gown or the latest Hannah Montana CD? And how dangerous is pink and pretty anyway — especially given girls' successes in the classroom and on the playing field? Being a princess is just make-believe, after all; eventually they grow out of it. Or do they? Does playing Cinderella shield girls from early sexualization — or prime them for it? Could today's little princess become tomorrow's sexting teen? And what if she does? Would that make her in charge of her sexuality — or an unwitting captive to it?

Those questions hit home with Peggy Orenstein, so she went sleuthing. She visited Disneyland and the international toy fair, trolled American Girl Place and Pottery Barn Kids, and met beauty pageant parents with preschoolers tricked out like Vegas showgirls. She dissected the science, created an online avatar, and parsed the original fairy tales. The stakes turn out to be higher than she — or we — ever imagined: nothing less than the health, development, and futures of our girls. From premature sexualization to the risk of depression to rising rates of narcissism, the potential negative impact of this new girlie-girl culture is undeniable — yet armed with awareness and recognition, parents can effectively counterbalance its influence in their daughters' lives.

Cinderella Ate My Daughter is a must-read for anyone who cares about girls, and for parents helping their daughters navigate the rocky road to adulthood.

Review:

"Orenstein, who has written about girls for nearly two decades (Schoolgirls), finds today's pink and princess-obsessed girl culture grating when it threatens to lure her own young daughter, Daisy. In her quest to determine whether princess mania is merely a passing phase or a more sinister marketing plot with long-term negative impact, Orenstein travels to Disneyland, American Girl Place, the American International Toy Fair; visits a children's beauty pageant; attends a Miley Cyrus concert; tools around the Internet; and interviews parents, historians, psychologists, marketers, and others. While she uncovers some disturbing news (such as the American Psychological Association's assertion that the 'girlie-girl' culture's emphasis on beauty and play-sexiness can increase girls' susceptibility to depression, eating disorders, distorted body image, and risky sexual behavior), she also finds that locking one's daughter away in a tower like a modern-day Rapunzel may not be necessary. Orenstein concludes that parents who think through their values early on and set reasonable limits, encourage dialogue and skepticism, and are canny about the consumer culture can combat the 24/7 'media machine' aimed at girls and hold off the focus on beauty, materialism, and the color pink somewhat. With insight and biting humor, the author explores her own conflicting feelings as a mother as she protects her offspring and probes the roots and tendrils of the girlie-girl movement. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"Reading Cinderella is like hanging out with a straight-talking, hilarious friend; taking a fascinating seminar on 21st century girlhood; and discovering a compendium of wise (but never preachy) advice on raising girls. A must-read for any parent trying to stay sane in a media saturated world." Rachel Simmons, author of Odd Girl Out and The Curse of the Good Girl

Review:

"I wish I'd had Peggy Orenstein's thought-provoking, wise, and entertaining new book, Cinderella Ate My Daughter, to comfort me and to help me navigate the Pepto Bismol pink aisles of the toy store and the cotton candy pink channels of the TV dial. Every mother needs to read this.” Ayelet Waldman, author of Bad Mother

Review:

“[Peggy Orenstein’s] addictively readable book manages, somehow, to be simultaneously warm and chilling” Rebecca Traister, author of Big Girls Don't Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American Women

Review:

“Orenstein has played a defining role in giving voice to this generation of girls and women.... At times this book brings tears to your eyes — tears of frustration with today’s girl-culture and also of relief because somebody finally gets it — and is speaking out on behalf of our daughters.” Judith Warner, author of Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age of Anxiety

Synopsis:

The rise of the girlie-girl, warns Peggy Orenstein, is no innocent phenomenon. Following her acclaimed books Flux, Schoolgirls, and the provocative New York Times bestseller Waiting for Daisy, Orensteins Cinderella Ate My Daughter offers a radical, timely wake-up call for parents, revealing the dark side of a pretty and pink culture confronting girls at every turn as they grow into adults.

About the Author

Peggy Orenstein is the author of the New York Times bestseller Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman's Quest to Become a Mother and Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self-Esteem, and the Confidence Gap. A contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, she has been published in, among others, USA Today; Vogue; Parenting; O, The Oprah Magazine; Salon; and The New Yorker. Orenstein lives in Northern California with her husband and their daughter, Daisy.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061711527
Publisher:
Harper
Subject:
Parenting - General
Author:
Orenstein, Peggy
Subject:
Mothers and daughters
Subject:
Femininity.
Subject:
Children's Studies
Subject:
Parenting
Subject:
Sociology-Children and Family
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20110125
Binding:
Book
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.89 in 14.4 oz

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » Parenting Teens
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 256 pages Harper - English 9780061711527 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Orenstein, who has written about girls for nearly two decades (Schoolgirls), finds today's pink and princess-obsessed girl culture grating when it threatens to lure her own young daughter, Daisy. In her quest to determine whether princess mania is merely a passing phase or a more sinister marketing plot with long-term negative impact, Orenstein travels to Disneyland, American Girl Place, the American International Toy Fair; visits a children's beauty pageant; attends a Miley Cyrus concert; tools around the Internet; and interviews parents, historians, psychologists, marketers, and others. While she uncovers some disturbing news (such as the American Psychological Association's assertion that the 'girlie-girl' culture's emphasis on beauty and play-sexiness can increase girls' susceptibility to depression, eating disorders, distorted body image, and risky sexual behavior), she also finds that locking one's daughter away in a tower like a modern-day Rapunzel may not be necessary. Orenstein concludes that parents who think through their values early on and set reasonable limits, encourage dialogue and skepticism, and are canny about the consumer culture can combat the 24/7 'media machine' aimed at girls and hold off the focus on beauty, materialism, and the color pink somewhat. With insight and biting humor, the author explores her own conflicting feelings as a mother as she protects her offspring and probes the roots and tendrils of the girlie-girl movement. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "Reading Cinderella is like hanging out with a straight-talking, hilarious friend; taking a fascinating seminar on 21st century girlhood; and discovering a compendium of wise (but never preachy) advice on raising girls. A must-read for any parent trying to stay sane in a media saturated world."
"Review" by , "I wish I'd had Peggy Orenstein's thought-provoking, wise, and entertaining new book, Cinderella Ate My Daughter, to comfort me and to help me navigate the Pepto Bismol pink aisles of the toy store and the cotton candy pink channels of the TV dial. Every mother needs to read this.”
"Review" by , “[Peggy Orenstein’s] addictively readable book manages, somehow, to be simultaneously warm and chilling” Rebecca Traister, author of Big Girls Don't Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American Women
"Review" by , “Orenstein has played a defining role in giving voice to this generation of girls and women.... At times this book brings tears to your eyes — tears of frustration with today’s girl-culture and also of relief because somebody finally gets it — and is speaking out on behalf of our daughters.”
"Synopsis" by , The rise of the girlie-girl, warns Peggy Orenstein, is no innocent phenomenon. Following her acclaimed books Flux, Schoolgirls, and the provocative New York Times bestseller Waiting for Daisy, Orensteins Cinderella Ate My Daughter offers a radical, timely wake-up call for parents, revealing the dark side of a pretty and pink culture confronting girls at every turn as they grow into adults.
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