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Making Toast

by

Making Toast Cover

ISBN13: 9780061825934
ISBN10: 006182593x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

 

Review-A-Day

"A thread of mystery runs through Making Toast: the content of a voice mail message Amy left for her brother and sister-in-law. No dire communication this — just Amy hinting to the grownups about Christmas gifts for the kids. "Would you like to hear it?" Rosenblatt's son Carl asks. He declines. It's only at the end of the book that Rosenblatt listens to Amy's voice on the answering machine, but he doesn't succumb to paroxysms of sorrow. Instead, because he's a grandfather and one of Amy's children wants breakfast, he does what they believe he does best: he makes toast." Jessica Handler, Rain Taxi (Read the entire Rain Taxi review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"How long are you staying, Boppo?"

"Forever."

When his daughter, Amy—a gifted doctor, mother, and wife—collapses and dies from an asymptomatic heart condition, Roger Rosenblatt and his wife, Ginny, leave their home on the South Shore of Long Island to move in with their son-in-law, Harris, and their three young grandchildren: six-year-old Jessica, four-year-old Sammy, and one-year-old James, known as Bubbies. Long past the years of diapers, homework, and recitals, Roger and Ginny—Boppo and Mimi to the kids—quickly reaccustom themselves to the world of small children: bedtime stories, talking toys, playdates, nonstop questions, and nonsequential thought. Though reeling from Amy's death they carry on, reconstructing a family, sustaining one another, and guiding three lively, alert, and tender-hearted children through the pains and confusions of grief. As he marvels at the strength of his son-in-law, a surgeon, and the tenacity and skill of his wife, a former kindergarten teacher, Roger attends each day to "the one household duty I have mastered"—preparing the morning toast perfectly to each child's liking.

With the wit, heart, precision, and depth of understanding that has characterized his work, Roger Rosenblatt peels back the layers on this most personal of losses to create both a tribute to his late daughter and a testament to familial love. The day Amy died, Harris told Ginny and Roger, "It's impossible." Roger's story tells how a family makes the possible of the impossible.

Synopsis:

“A painfully beautiful memoir….Written with such restraint as to be both heartbreaking and instructive.”

—E. L. Doctorow

 

A revered, many times honored (George Polk, Peabody, and Emmy Award winner, to name but a few) journalist, novelist, and playwright, Roger Rosenblatt shares the unforgettable story of the tragedy that changed his life and his family. A book that grew out of his popular December 2008 essay in The New Yorker, Making Toast is a moving account of unexpected loss and recovery in the powerful tradition of About Alice and The Year of Magical Thinking. Writer Ann Beattie offers high praise to the acclaimed author of Lapham Rising and Beet for a memoir that is, “written so forthrightly, but so delicately, that you feel youre a part of this family.”

Synopsis:

"How long are you staying, Boppo?"

"Forever."

When his daughter, Amy—a gifted doctor, mother, and wife—collapses and dies from an asymptomatic heart condition, Roger Rosenblatt and his wife, Ginny, leave their home on the South Shore of Long Island to move in with their son-in-law, Harris, and their three young grandchildren: six-year-old Jessica, four-year-old Sammy, and one-year-old James, known as Bubbies. Long past the years of diapers, homework, and recitals, Roger and Ginny—Boppo and Mimi to the kids—quickly reaccustom themselves to the world of small children: bedtime stories, talking toys, playdates, nonstop questions, and nonsequential thought. Though reeling from Amy's death they carry on, reconstructing a family, sustaining one another, and guiding three lively, alert, and tender-hearted children through the pains and confusions of grief. As he marvels at the strength of his son-in-law, a surgeon, and the tenacity and skill of his wife, a former kindergarten teacher, Roger attends each day to "the one household duty I have mastered"—preparing the morning toast perfectly to each child's liking.

With the wit, heart, precision, and depth of understanding that has characterized his work, Roger Rosenblatt peels back the layers on this most personal of losses to create both a tribute to his late daughter and a testament to familial love. The day Amy died, Harris told Ginny and Roger, "It's impossible." Roger's story tells how a family makes the possible of the impossible.

About the Author

Roger Rosenblatts essays for Time and The NewsHour on PBS have won two George Polk Awards, a Peabody, and an Emmy. He is the author of fifteen books, including the national bestsellers Unless It Moves the Human Heart, Making Toast, Rules for Aging, Lapham Rising, and Children of War, which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He is Distinguished Professor of English and Writing at Stony Brook University. He lives with his family in Bethesda, Maryland, and Quogue, New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Carol Foisset, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by Carol Foisset)
Beautiful tribute to a loved daughter, a study in grief and how we go on living in the midst of it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
Carol Foisset, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by Carol Foisset)
Beautiful tribute to a loved daughter, a study in how we face grief and go on living.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
Lynne Perednia, March 29, 2010 (view all comments by Lynne Perednia)
Less than a month before Christmas in 2007, an apparently healthy doctor, wife and mother suddenly died at home. Her parents came to help her widower and three young children, and stayed.

Because the woman's parents are decent, kind-hearted people, as are her husband and siblings, this is a calm, gentle book about a family being good to each other even while everyone's heart breaks. Because her father is noted writer and teacher Roger Rosenblatt, readers are brought into the family circle.

Making toast is the morning job assigned to Rosenblatt, whose "grandpa" name is Boppo. He even has a song about how great Boppo is and delights in teaching it not only to his grandchildren, but to one of their classes at school, where it is a hit. Boppo finds solace in the seemingly mundane task of getting everyone's breakfast correct. Grandson Bubbies, 2, demands real toast and, with calm authority, his grandfather's presence at the breakfast table. His grandfather writes that Bubbies sounds the way Paul Newman should have when he was a baby.

Despite the trauma of two of the three children discovering their mother dead of an asymptomatic heart condition during an exercise session at home, there is little drama in the book. And that's on purpose. The joys are calm, the hurt deep but shared without being maudlin, the children are put first by everyone with no one complaining about "my" time. Instead, Rosenblatt shows how he and the other adults find their small life pleasures in taking care of the daily routines that keep the children in school, active and listened to whenever they have something to say.

Without going into specifics of how time began to heal his wounds, and none of that "closure" business, Rosenblatt writes of the one time he felt another presence. He writes of how he puts off listening to his daughter's last voicemail message. He writes of carrying on day by day.

Rosenblatt also has tidbits throughout about the writing process and creative process, both with his college students and grandchildren, that resonate with their reality.

Making Toast is a lovely book about one way to approach the aftermath of something horrific. It is balm to read and an honor to be invited, even at a distance, into this family.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780061825934
Author:
Rosenblatt, Roger
Publisher:
Ecco
Author:
Flowers, Charles
Author:
O'Reilly, Bill
Subject:
General
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
General Political Science
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20100216
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
8.30x5.86x.70 in. .61 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Grief

Making Toast Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Ecco - English 9780061825934 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "A thread of mystery runs through Making Toast: the content of a voice mail message Amy left for her brother and sister-in-law. No dire communication this — just Amy hinting to the grownups about Christmas gifts for the kids. "Would you like to hear it?" Rosenblatt's son Carl asks. He declines. It's only at the end of the book that Rosenblatt listens to Amy's voice on the answering machine, but he doesn't succumb to paroxysms of sorrow. Instead, because he's a grandfather and one of Amy's children wants breakfast, he does what they believe he does best: he makes toast." (Read the entire Rain Taxi review)
"Synopsis" by ,

“A painfully beautiful memoir….Written with such restraint as to be both heartbreaking and instructive.”

—E. L. Doctorow

 

A revered, many times honored (George Polk, Peabody, and Emmy Award winner, to name but a few) journalist, novelist, and playwright, Roger Rosenblatt shares the unforgettable story of the tragedy that changed his life and his family. A book that grew out of his popular December 2008 essay in The New Yorker, Making Toast is a moving account of unexpected loss and recovery in the powerful tradition of About Alice and The Year of Magical Thinking. Writer Ann Beattie offers high praise to the acclaimed author of Lapham Rising and Beet for a memoir that is, “written so forthrightly, but so delicately, that you feel youre a part of this family.”

"Synopsis" by ,

"How long are you staying, Boppo?"

"Forever."

When his daughter, Amy—a gifted doctor, mother, and wife—collapses and dies from an asymptomatic heart condition, Roger Rosenblatt and his wife, Ginny, leave their home on the South Shore of Long Island to move in with their son-in-law, Harris, and their three young grandchildren: six-year-old Jessica, four-year-old Sammy, and one-year-old James, known as Bubbies. Long past the years of diapers, homework, and recitals, Roger and Ginny—Boppo and Mimi to the kids—quickly reaccustom themselves to the world of small children: bedtime stories, talking toys, playdates, nonstop questions, and nonsequential thought. Though reeling from Amy's death they carry on, reconstructing a family, sustaining one another, and guiding three lively, alert, and tender-hearted children through the pains and confusions of grief. As he marvels at the strength of his son-in-law, a surgeon, and the tenacity and skill of his wife, a former kindergarten teacher, Roger attends each day to "the one household duty I have mastered"—preparing the morning toast perfectly to each child's liking.

With the wit, heart, precision, and depth of understanding that has characterized his work, Roger Rosenblatt peels back the layers on this most personal of losses to create both a tribute to his late daughter and a testament to familial love. The day Amy died, Harris told Ginny and Roger, "It's impossible." Roger's story tells how a family makes the possible of the impossible.

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