The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | September 2, 2014

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$27.99
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
5 Beaverton ADV- THRILLERS
4 Burnside ADV- THRILLERS
1 Hawthorne ADV- THRILLERS
25 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z
25 Remote Warehouse Literature- A to Z

More copies of this ISBN

The Pagan Lord (Saxon Tales)

by

The Pagan Lord (Saxon Tales) Cover

ISBN13: 9780061969706
ISBN10: 0061969702
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Bernard Cornwell — "the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today" (Wall Street Journal) — returns to his Saxon Tales saga with the epic story of divided loyalties, bloody battles, and the struggle to unite Britain.

At the onset of the tenth century, England is in turmoil. Alfred the Great is dead and his son Edward reigns as king. Wessex survives but peace cannot hold: the Danes in the north, led by Viking Cnut Longsword, stand ready to invade and will never rest until the emerald crown is theirs.

Uhtred, once Alfred's great warrior but now out of favor with the new king, must lead a band of outcasts north to recapture his old family home, the impregnable Northumbrian fortress Bebbanburg.

Loyalties will be divided and men will fall as each Saxon kingdom is drawn into the bloodiest battle yet with the Danes — a war that will decide the fate of every king, and the entire English nation.

With The Pagan Lord, New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell, "the reigning king of historical fiction" (USA Today), continues his magnificent epic of the making of England during the Middle Ages, vividly bringing to life the uneasy alliances, violent combat, and deadly intrigue that gave birth to the British nation.

Review:

"In Cornwell's (1356) latest, 10th century Britain is a splintered land, populated by pagans and Christians and divided between Saxons and Danes. The pagan Uhtred, once favored by Alfred the Great, finds himself distrusted by Alfred's successor, Edward, and at odds with the Christians. Made an outlaw by an ill-considered violent act, he heads north to recapture his old home, the fortress of Bebbanburg; though his grand scheme is less bold than foolhardy. It sets Uhtred on the path to play a crucial role in the coming war between Cnut's Danes and Edward's Saxons. For Uhtred the stakes are personal glory and vengeance against those who wronged him, but the fate of Britain itself hangs on the unforeseeable consequences of his actions. Cornwell successfully brings an unjustly obscure era in British history to life, showing how grand events can be shaped by what are essentially petty motivations. Cornwell skillfully illuminates the competing cultures of the 10th Century; the conflict between Dane and Saxon is examined with sympathy and insight — without projecting 21st century values onto cultures now alien to us. In the course of this, he shows how historical novels should be written. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

“Uhtred of Bebbanburg rides into battle once again in the seventh installment of Cornwell's stellar Saxon Tales series….Cornwell excels at depicting gloriously gory battle scenes as well as the inherent religious, political, and martial conflicts upon which a great nation was born.” Booklist

Review:

“Cornwell successfully brings an unjustly obscure era in British history to life….The conflict between Dane and Saxon is examined with sympathy and insight-without projecting 21st century values onto cultures now alien to us. In the course of this, he shows how historical novels should be written.” Publishers Weekly

Review:

“Cornwell, a master of historical fiction, has written another energetic and involving mix of history and storytelling that will please his many fans….A sweeping story.” Library Journal

Review:

“A violent, absorbing historical saga, deeply researched and thoroughly imagined.” Washington Post

About the Author

Bernard Cornwell is the author of the acclaimed New York Times bestsellers 1356 and Agincourt; the bestselling Saxon Tales, which include The Last Kingdom, The Pale Horseman, Lords of the North, Sword Song, The Burning Land, and most recently Death of Kings; and the Richard Sharpe novels, among many others. He lives with his wife on Cape Cod and in Charleston, South Carolina.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Edward Hahn, July 19, 2014 (view all comments by Edward Hahn)
I have run out of superlatives to describe the skill with which Bernard Cornwell writes historical fiction. This book, the seventh in the Saxon Chronicles Series, is neither the best nor the worst of the series. But, then who cares? Once entered into the world of Uhtred of Bebbanburg, the story carries the reader into the 9th Century and doesn't deposit him or her back into the 21st until the book is finished.

Narrated in the first person by Uhtred himself, there are hints that maybe this volume will describe how he regains his ancestral home but you will have to read the book yourself to find out if that happens.

As in all of Cornwell's books this one is loaded with a great deal of action but also a good amount of introspection as Uhtred contemplates the possibility that he will never belong in either of the two major cultures of Britain, Saxon and Christian or Viking and Pagan. One thing we do know about him is that he will do what he believes is true to his oath no matter what.

He's aged over the years and has gotten a little crusty. He now travels with one of his sons and disowns the other who has become a priest. He is still a master at sword fighting and manning the shield wall. He still, in periods of great stress, adheres to his pagan gods. He still can out-think even the cleverest of his enemies because he is not blinded by what others believe to be true or what they tell him.

This story takes place on both land and sea which upped the interest level for me. Uhtred's periods of doubt happen more often now as he grows more experienced in the ways of the world and realizes all that could go wrong. Nevertheless in this story as in the others his staunch belief in himself and his courage carries him to victory in the culminating battle.

I highly recommend this book, hoping you will have at least read the first two volumes of the series so you can put what's happening in context.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Edward Hahn, July 19, 2014 (view all comments by Edward Hahn)
I have run out of superlatives to describe the skill with which Bernard Cornwell writes historical fiction. This book, the seventh in the Saxon Chronicles Series, is neither the best nor the worst of the series. But, then who cares? Once entered into the world of Uhtred of Bebbanburg, the story carries the reader into the 9th Century and doesn't deposit him or her back into the 21st until the book is finished.

Narrated in the first person by Uhtred himself, there are hints that maybe this volume will describe how he regains his ancestral home but you will have to read the book yourself to find out if that happens.

As in all of Cornwell's books this one is loaded with a great deal of action but also a good amount of introspection as Uhtred contemplates the possibility that he will never belong in either of the two major cultures of Britain, Saxon and Christian or Viking and Pagan. One thing we do know about him is that he will do what he believes is true to his oath no matter what.

He's aged over the years and has gotten a little crusty. He now travels with one of his sons and disowns the other who has become a priest. He is still a master at sword fighting and manning the shield wall. He still, in periods of great stress, adheres to his pagan gods. He still can out-think even the cleverest of his enemies because he is not blinded by what others believe to be true or what they tell him.

This story takes place on both land and sea which upped the interest level for me. Uhtred's periods of doubt happen more often now as he grows more experienced in the ways of the world and realizes all that could go wrong. Nevertheless in this story as in the others his staunch belief in himself and his courage carries him to victory in the culminating battle.

I highly recommend this book, hoping you will have at least read the first two volumes of the series so you can put what's happening in context.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Edward Hahn, July 19, 2014 (view all comments by Edward Hahn)
I have run out of superlatives to describe the skill with which Bernard Cornwell writes historical fiction. This book, the seventh in the Saxon Chronicles Series, is neither the best nor the worst of the series. But, then who cares? Once entered into the world of Uhtred of Bebbanburg, the story carries the reader into the 9th Century and doesn't deposit him or her back into the 21st until the book is finished.

Narrated in the first person by Uhtred himself, there are hints that maybe this volume will describe how he regains his ancestral home but you will have to read the book yourself to find out if that happens.

As in all of Cornwell's books this one is loaded with a great deal of action but also a good amount of introspection as Uhtred contemplates the possibility that he will never belong in either of the two major cultures of Britain, Saxon and Christian or Viking and Pagan. One thing we do know about him is that he will do what he believes is true to his oath no matter what.

He's aged over the years and has gotten a little crusty. He now travels with one of his sons and disowns the other who has become a priest. He is still a master at sword fighting and manning the shield wall. He still, in periods of great stress, adheres to his pagan gods. He still can out-think even the cleverest of his enemies because he is not blinded by what others believe to be true or what they tell him.

This story takes place on both land and sea which upped the interest level for me. Uhtred's periods of doubt happen more often now as he grows more experienced in the ways of the world and realizes all that could go wrong. Nevertheless in this story as in the others his staunch belief in himself and his courage carries him to victory in the culminating battle.

I highly recommend this book, hoping you will have at least read the first two volumes of the series so you can put what's happening in context.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061969706
Author:
Cornwell, Bernard
Publisher:
Harper
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Historical
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Saxon Tales
Publication Date:
20140107
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1.41 in 22.8 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Ooku: The Inner Chambers #08: Ooku:... New Trade Paper $12.99

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Adventure
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Contemporary Thrillers
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Military

The Pagan Lord (Saxon Tales) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$27.99 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Harper - English 9780061969706 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In Cornwell's (1356) latest, 10th century Britain is a splintered land, populated by pagans and Christians and divided between Saxons and Danes. The pagan Uhtred, once favored by Alfred the Great, finds himself distrusted by Alfred's successor, Edward, and at odds with the Christians. Made an outlaw by an ill-considered violent act, he heads north to recapture his old home, the fortress of Bebbanburg; though his grand scheme is less bold than foolhardy. It sets Uhtred on the path to play a crucial role in the coming war between Cnut's Danes and Edward's Saxons. For Uhtred the stakes are personal glory and vengeance against those who wronged him, but the fate of Britain itself hangs on the unforeseeable consequences of his actions. Cornwell successfully brings an unjustly obscure era in British history to life, showing how grand events can be shaped by what are essentially petty motivations. Cornwell skillfully illuminates the competing cultures of the 10th Century; the conflict between Dane and Saxon is examined with sympathy and insight — without projecting 21st century values onto cultures now alien to us. In the course of this, he shows how historical novels should be written. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , “Uhtred of Bebbanburg rides into battle once again in the seventh installment of Cornwell's stellar Saxon Tales series….Cornwell excels at depicting gloriously gory battle scenes as well as the inherent religious, political, and martial conflicts upon which a great nation was born.”
"Review" by , “Cornwell successfully brings an unjustly obscure era in British history to life….The conflict between Dane and Saxon is examined with sympathy and insight-without projecting 21st century values onto cultures now alien to us. In the course of this, he shows how historical novels should be written.”
"Review" by , “Cornwell, a master of historical fiction, has written another energetic and involving mix of history and storytelling that will please his many fans….A sweeping story.”
"Review" by , “A violent, absorbing historical saga, deeply researched and thoroughly imagined.”
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.