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1 Burnside Reference- Grammar and Style

The Elephants of Style: A Trunkload of Tips on the Big Issues and Gray Areas of Contemporary American English

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The Elephants of Style: A Trunkload of Tips on the Big Issues and Gray Areas of Contemporary American English Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Advice on good writing from everybody's favorite editorial curmudgeon

Persnickety, cantankerous, opinionated, entertaining, hilarious, wise...these are a few of the adjectives reviewers used to describe good-writing maven Bill Walsh's previous book, Lapsing Into a Comma. Now, picking up where he left off in Lapsing, Walsh addresses the dozen or so biggest issues that every writer or editor must master. He also offers a trunkload of good advice on the many little things that add up to good writing. Featuring all the elements that made Lapsing such a fun read, including Walsh's trademark acerbic wit and fascinating digressions on language and its discontents, The Elephants of Style provides: Tips on how to tame the "elephants of style" — the most important, frequently confused elements of good writing More of Walsh's popular "Curmudgeon's Stylebook" — includes entries such as Snarky Specificity, Metaphors, Near and Far, Actually is the New Like, and other uses and misuses of language Expert advice for writers and editors on how to work together for best results.

Some highlights:

On Our Evolving Language
Among the opinionated, the speed of language evolution is a lot like speed on the highway. George Carlin?s observation comes to mind: ?Why is it that anybody who drives slower than you is a moron, but anybody who drives faster than you is a maniac??

On ?Fast? vs. ?Quickly?
When the road is clear, I like to drive fast. If you?re bristling at the idea of doing something fast instead of quickly, you?re stuck in Adverb Amateur Hour. Now, stop humming the ?Lolly, Lolly, Lolly? song from ?Schoolhouse Rock? for a moment, and pick up the dictionary.

On ?The Foreseeable Future?
How much of the future is foreseeable? A month? A week? (If it were any longer than a minute or so, wouldn?t you be a stock-market billionaire?) This cliche is defensible only if you?re writing for the Miss Cleo Monthly.

On ?Ranging?
A Scripps Howard story on actor John Leguizamo mentions that he ?has starred in films and TV projects ranging from ?Moulin Rouge? to ?Arabian Nights.? ? Let?s see, how does that continuum go again? Oh, yes, there?s ?Moulin Rouge,? then ?The Incredible Mr. Limpet,? ?Davey and Goliath,? and ?Gonorrhea and You: A Cautionary Tale,? and then finally ?Arabian Nights.?

Synopsis:

Advice on good writing from everybody's favorite editorial curmudgeon

Persnickety, cantankerous, opinionated, entertaining, hilarious, wise...these are a few of the adjectives reviewers used to describe good-writing maven Bill Walsh's previous book, Lapsing Into a Comma. Now, picking up where he left off in Lapsing, Walsh addresses the dozen or so biggest issues that every writer or editor must master. He also offers a trunkload of good advice on the many little things that add up to good writing. Featuring all the elements that made Lapsing such a fun read, including Walsh's trademark acerbic wit and fascinating digressions on language and its discontents, The Elephants of Style provides:

  • Tips on how to tame the "elephants of style"--the most important, frequently confused elements of good writing
  • More of Walsh's popular "Curmudgeon's Stylebook"--includes entries such as Snarky Specificity, Metaphors, Near and Far, Actually is the New Like, and other uses and misuses of language
  • Expert advice for writers and editors on how to work together for best results

Synopsis:

A thorough, and thoroughly entertaining, guide to writing like the pros

What do writers and editors mean when they talk about style? Sometimes they mean formatting for consistency and clarity. (Is it Texas or Tex. or TX? One space or two after a period?) Sometimes they mean correctness in spelling, grammar, word usage and punctuation. (A historic or an historic? The data is or the data are?) And sometimes they mean style as in stylishness. (Bright and breezy or just-the-facts-ma'am? Is that cute little idea fresh and original or tired and silly?) Inside, you'll find answers that will add polish and sparkle to your writing.

In the word-nerd classic Lapsing Into a Comma, Bill Walsh of the Washington Post entertained, educated and enlightened writers, editors, students and language lovers with commonsense guidelines and opinionated commentary on American English in the computer age. In The Elephants of Style he takes a step back and presents an in-depth look at the basics, including spelling, capitalization, abbreviations, subject-verb agreement, plurals and possessives.

With sometimes acerbic wit, the author also addresses:

  • The lies your English teacher told you.
  • Balancing the traditional ("Once wrong, always wrong") with the progressive ("Everybody does it") as language continues to evolve.
  • How and why major publications differ in their handling of basic spelling, capitalization and punctuation issues.
  • How empathy between writers and editors can make writing better.

The Elephants of Style includes a continuation of The Curmudgeon's Stylebook, Walsh's A-to-Z glossary of style matters big and small, guaranteed to address questions that no other usage manuals cover. Is Starbucks a coffee shop? Is it porn or porno?

About the Author

Bill Walsh is the copy chief for national news at the Washington Post and the creator of the popular Web site The Slot: A Spot for Copy Editors (www.theslot.com). He lives in Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780071422680
Author:
Walsh, Bill
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Companies
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Writing Skills
Subject:
English language
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing - General
Subject:
English language -- United States -- Style.
Subject:
English language -- United States -- Usage.
Subject:
Reference/Writing
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1
Series Volume:
1277
Publication Date:
March 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
238
Dimensions:
8.24x5.54x.72 in. .72 lbs.

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Related Subjects

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The Elephants of Style: A Trunkload of Tips on the Big Issues and Gray Areas of Contemporary American English Used Trade Paper
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Product details 238 pages McGraw-Hill Companies - English 9780071422680 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Advice on good writing from everybody's favorite editorial curmudgeon

Persnickety, cantankerous, opinionated, entertaining, hilarious, wise...these are a few of the adjectives reviewers used to describe good-writing maven Bill Walsh's previous book, Lapsing Into a Comma. Now, picking up where he left off in Lapsing, Walsh addresses the dozen or so biggest issues that every writer or editor must master. He also offers a trunkload of good advice on the many little things that add up to good writing. Featuring all the elements that made Lapsing such a fun read, including Walsh's trademark acerbic wit and fascinating digressions on language and its discontents, The Elephants of Style provides:

  • Tips on how to tame the "elephants of style"--the most important, frequently confused elements of good writing
  • More of Walsh's popular "Curmudgeon's Stylebook"--includes entries such as Snarky Specificity, Metaphors, Near and Far, Actually is the New Like, and other uses and misuses of language
  • Expert advice for writers and editors on how to work together for best results

"Synopsis" by , A thorough, and thoroughly entertaining, guide to writing like the pros

What do writers and editors mean when they talk about style? Sometimes they mean formatting for consistency and clarity. (Is it Texas or Tex. or TX? One space or two after a period?) Sometimes they mean correctness in spelling, grammar, word usage and punctuation. (A historic or an historic? The data is or the data are?) And sometimes they mean style as in stylishness. (Bright and breezy or just-the-facts-ma'am? Is that cute little idea fresh and original or tired and silly?) Inside, you'll find answers that will add polish and sparkle to your writing.

In the word-nerd classic Lapsing Into a Comma, Bill Walsh of the Washington Post entertained, educated and enlightened writers, editors, students and language lovers with commonsense guidelines and opinionated commentary on American English in the computer age. In The Elephants of Style he takes a step back and presents an in-depth look at the basics, including spelling, capitalization, abbreviations, subject-verb agreement, plurals and possessives.

With sometimes acerbic wit, the author also addresses:

  • The lies your English teacher told you.
  • Balancing the traditional ("Once wrong, always wrong") with the progressive ("Everybody does it") as language continues to evolve.
  • How and why major publications differ in their handling of basic spelling, capitalization and punctuation issues.
  • How empathy between writers and editors can make writing better.

The Elephants of Style includes a continuation of The Curmudgeon's Stylebook, Walsh's A-to-Z glossary of style matters big and small, guaranteed to address questions that no other usage manuals cover. Is Starbucks a coffee shop? Is it porn or porno?

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