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The New Machiavelli

by

The New Machiavelli Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Without warning or preparation, increment involving countless possibilities of further increment was coming to the strength of horses and men. Power, all unsuspected, was flowing like a drug into the veins of the social body. Nobody seems to have perceived this coming of power, and nobody had calculated its probable consequences. Suddenly, almost inadvertently, people found themselves doing things that would have amazed their ancestors. . . .

Synopsis:

A Bromstead Rip van Winkle from 1550 returning in 1750 would have found most of the old houses still as he had known them, the same trades a little improved and differentiated one from the other, the same roads rather more carefully tended, the Inns not very much altered, the ancient familiar market-house. The occasional wheeled traffic would have struck him as the most remarkable difference, next perhaps to the swaggering painted stone monuments instead of brasses and the protestant severity of the communion-table in the parish church, — both from the material point of view very little things. A Rip van Winkle from 1350, again, would have noticed scarcely greater changes; fewer clergy, more people, and particularly more people of the middling sort; the glass in the windows of many of the houses, the stylish chimneys springing up everywhere would have impressed him, and suchlike details. The place would have had the same boundaries, the same broad essential features, would have been still itself in the way that a man is still himself after he has "filled out" a little and grown a longer beard and changed his clothes.

But after 1750 something got hold of the world, something that was destined to alter the scale of every human affair.

That something was machinery and a vague energetic disposition to improve material things. In another part of England ingenious people were beginning to use coal in smelting iron, and were producing metal in abundance and metal castings in sizes that had hitherto been unattainable. Without warning or preparation, increment involving countless possibilities of further increment was coming to the strength of horses and men. "Power," all unsuspected, wasflowing like a drug into the veins of the social body.

Nobody seems to have perceived this coming of power, and nobody had calculated its probable consequences. Suddenly, almost inadvertently, people found themselves doing things that would have amazed their ancestors. . . .

Synopsis:

A successful author and Liberal MP with a loving and benevolent wife, Richard Remington appears to be a man to envy. But underneath his superficial contentment, he is far from happy with either his marriage or the politics of his party. The New Machiavelli describes the disarray into which his life is thrown when he meets the young and beautiful Isabel Rivers and becomes tormented by desire.

About the Author

H. G. Wells (1866–1946) was a professional writer and journalist who published more than a hundred books. He is widely considered the father of science fiction.

Gillian Beer is president of the British Comparative Literature Association.

Michael Foot is a former leader of the Labour Party in England and the author of numerous volumes of literary criticism.

Simon J. James is a lecturer in Victorian literature at the University of Durham.

John S. Partington is the editor of The Wellsian, the annual journal of the H. G. Wells Society.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780141439990
Author:
Wells, H. G.
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Introduction by:
Foot, Michael
Introduction:
Foot, Michael
Editor:
James, Simon
Author:
Foot, Michael
Author:
James, Simon
Author:
Partington, John
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Man-woman relationships
Subject:
Political science
Subject:
Political fiction
Subject:
Politics and government
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
1.00 in.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The New Machiavelli New Trade Paper
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Product details 512 pages Penguin Books - English 9780141439990 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A Bromstead Rip van Winkle from 1550 returning in 1750 would have found most of the old houses still as he had known them, the same trades a little improved and differentiated one from the other, the same roads rather more carefully tended, the Inns not very much altered, the ancient familiar market-house. The occasional wheeled traffic would have struck him as the most remarkable difference, next perhaps to the swaggering painted stone monuments instead of brasses and the protestant severity of the communion-table in the parish church, — both from the material point of view very little things. A Rip van Winkle from 1350, again, would have noticed scarcely greater changes; fewer clergy, more people, and particularly more people of the middling sort; the glass in the windows of many of the houses, the stylish chimneys springing up everywhere would have impressed him, and suchlike details. The place would have had the same boundaries, the same broad essential features, would have been still itself in the way that a man is still himself after he has "filled out" a little and grown a longer beard and changed his clothes.

But after 1750 something got hold of the world, something that was destined to alter the scale of every human affair.

That something was machinery and a vague energetic disposition to improve material things. In another part of England ingenious people were beginning to use coal in smelting iron, and were producing metal in abundance and metal castings in sizes that had hitherto been unattainable. Without warning or preparation, increment involving countless possibilities of further increment was coming to the strength of horses and men. "Power," all unsuspected, wasflowing like a drug into the veins of the social body.

Nobody seems to have perceived this coming of power, and nobody had calculated its probable consequences. Suddenly, almost inadvertently, people found themselves doing things that would have amazed their ancestors. . . .

"Synopsis" by ,
A successful author and Liberal MP with a loving and benevolent wife, Richard Remington appears to be a man to envy. But underneath his superficial contentment, he is far from happy with either his marriage or the politics of his party. The New Machiavelli describes the disarray into which his life is thrown when he meets the young and beautiful Isabel Rivers and becomes tormented by desire.

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