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This title in other editions

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History

by

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History Cover

ISBN13: 9780143036494
ISBN10: 0143036491
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

No disease the world has ever known even remotely resembles the great influenza epidemic of 1918. Presumed to have begun when sick farm animals infected soldiers in Kansas, spreading and mutating into a lethal strain as troops carried it to Europe, it exploded across the world with unequaled ferocity and speed. It killed more people in twenty weeks than AIDS has killed in twenty years; it killed more people in a year than the plagues of the Middle Ages killed in a century. Victims bled from the ears and nose, turned blue from lack of oxygen, suffered aches that felt like bones being broken, and died. In the United States, where bodies were stacked without coffins on trucks, nearly seven times as many people died of influenza as in the First World War.

In his powerful new book, award-winning historian John M. Barry unfolds a tale that is magisterial in its breadth and in the depth of its research, and spellbinding as he weaves multiple narrative strands together. In this first great collision between science and epidemic disease, even as society approached collapse, a handful of heroic researchers stepped forward, risking their lives to confront this strange disease. Titans like William Welch at the newly formed Johns Hopkins Medical School and colleagues at Rockefeller University and others from around the country revolutionized American science and public health, and their work in this crisis led to crucial discoveries that we are still using and learning from today.

The Washington Post’s Jonathan Yardley said Barry’s last book can “change the way we think.” The Great Influenza may also change the way we see the world.

Synopsis:

From one of the most acclaimed writers of nonfiction for children, Invincible Microbe illuminates the seemingly unstoppable killer that's been haunting us for centuries: tuberculosis. Well-researched and including over 100 archival photos and prints, this compelling "biography" of a deadly germ is a must-read.

Synopsis:

This is the story of a killer that has been striking people down for thousands of years:

tuberculosis. After centuries of ineffective treatments, the microorganism that causes

TB was identified, and the cure was thought to be within reachand#8212;but drug-resistant

varieties continue to plague and panic the human race. The and#8220;biographyand#8221; of this deadly

germ, an account of the diagnosis, treatment, and and#8220;cureand#8221; of the disease over time,

and the social history of an illness that could strike anywhere but was most prevalent

among the poor are woven together in an engrossing, carefully researched narrative.

Bibliography, source notes, index.

Synopsis:

At the height of WWI, historyandrsquo;s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

About the Author

John M. Barry is the author of four previous books, including the highly acclaimed and award-winning Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America.

Table of Contents

Prologue

Part I: The Warriors

Part II: The Swarm

Part III: The Tinderbox

Part IV: It Begins

Part V: Explosion

Part VI: The Pestilence

Part VII: The Race

Part VIII: The Tolling Of The Bell

Part IX: Lingerer

Part X: Endgame

Afterword

Acknowledgments

Notes

Bibliography

Index

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

UnofficialRose, March 15, 2009 (view all comments by UnofficialRose)
This book not only tells the story of the great influenza, but places it in historical context, so that you understand _why_ the flu was so hard to find, and how it spread to kill so many people so quickly -- plus the follow-on effects that we're feeling to this day. Within this sweeping history, it's the tiny, fascinating details that pull the reader into the action. You'll leave this book with a better understanding of medical history, early 20th-century life, PR and marketing ... it all interconnects in this utterly fascinating story.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
Taynb, January 17, 2008 (view all comments by Taynb)
If you have ever were curious about infectious diseases, you will be interested in this. The book is based on the 1918 influenza epidemic, that seemed to have no end because it seemed to be misdiagnosed in so many people. It was hard hit among the young and old but also spread through soldiers during WWI. Seemed to spread through troop movement and when soldiers came back home. It tended to get a little repetitive in the last 100 pages but still a good read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 14 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143036494
Author:
Barry, John M
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Author:
Barry, John M.
Author:
Pendergrast, Mark
Author:
Blank, Alison
Author:
Murphy, Jim
Subject:
Medicine
Subject:
History
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Infectious Diseases
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Influenza Epidemic, 1918-1919
Subject:
Influenza Epidemic, 1918-1919 - United States
Subject:
Diseases
Subject:
Health and Medicine-History of Medicine
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Subject:
World
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20051031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16-page b/w photo insert
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
8.00 x 5.31 in
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Death and Dying
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Featured Titles
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 560 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143036494 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
From one of the most acclaimed writers of nonfiction for children, Invincible Microbe illuminates the seemingly unstoppable killer that's been haunting us for centuries: tuberculosis. Well-researched and including over 100 archival photos and prints, this compelling "biography" of a deadly germ is a must-read.
"Synopsis" by , This is the story of a killer that has been striking people down for thousands of years:

tuberculosis. After centuries of ineffective treatments, the microorganism that causes

TB was identified, and the cure was thought to be within reachand#8212;but drug-resistant

varieties continue to plague and panic the human race. The and#8220;biographyand#8221; of this deadly

germ, an account of the diagnosis, treatment, and and#8220;cureand#8221; of the disease over time,

and the social history of an illness that could strike anywhere but was most prevalent

among the poor are woven together in an engrossing, carefully researched narrative.

Bibliography, source notes, index.

"Synopsis" by ,

At the height of WWI, historyandrsquo;s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

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