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2 Burnside Agriculture- General

Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer

by

Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer Cover

ISBN13: 9780143117285
ISBN10: 0143117289
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Urban and rural collide in this wry, inspiring memoir of a woman who turned a vacant lot in downtown Oakland into a thriving farm.

Novella Carpenter loves cities — the culture, the crowds, the energy. At the same time, she can't shake the fact that she is the daughter of two back-to-the-land hippies who taught her to love nature and eat vegetables. Ambivalent about repeating her parents' disastrous mistakes, yet drawn to the idea of backyard self-sufficiency, Carpenter decided that it might be possible to have it both ways: a homegrown vegetable plot as well as museums, bars, concerts, and a twenty-four-hour convenience mart mere minutes away. Especially when she moved to a ramshackle house in inner city Oakland and discovered a weed-choked, garbage-strewn abandoned lot next door. She closed her eyes and pictured heirloom tomatoes, a beehive, and a chicken coop.

What started out as a few egg-laying chickens led to turkeys, geese, and ducks. Soon, some rabbits joined the fun, then two three-hundred-pound pigs. And no, these charming and eccentric animals weren't pets; she was a farmer, not a zookeeper. Novella was raising these animals for dinner. Novella Carpenter's corner of downtown Oakland is populated by unforgettable characters. Lana (anal spelled backward, she reminds us) runs a speakeasy across the street and refuses to hurt even a fly, let alone condone raising turkeys for Thanksgiving. Bobby, the homeless man who collects cars and car parts just outside the farm, is an invaluable neighborhood concierge. The turkeys, Harold and Maude, tend to escape on a daily basis to cavort with the prostitutes hanging around just off the highway nearby. Every day on this strange and beautiful farm, urban meets rural in the most surprising ways.

For anyone who has ever grown herbs on their windowsill, tomatoes on their fire escape, or obsessed over the offerings at the local farmers' market, Carpenter's story will capture your heart. And if you've ever considered leaving it all behind to become a farmer outside the city limits, or looked at the abandoned lot next door with a gleam in your eye, consider this both a cautionary tale and a full-throated call to action. Farm City is an unforgettably charming memoir, full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmers' tips, and a great deal of heart. It is also a moving meditation on urban life versus the natural world and what we have given up to live the way we do.

Review:

"By turns edgy, moving, and hilarious." Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food

Synopsis:

An unforgettably charming memoir, Farm City is full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmer's tips, and a great deal of heart. When Novella Carpenter — captivated by the idea of backyard self-sufficiency — moved to inner city Oakland and discovered a weed-choked, garbage- strewn abandoned lot next door to her house, she closed her eyes and pictured heirloom tomatoes and a chicken coop. The story of how her urban farm grew from a few chickens to one populated with turkeys, geese, rabbits, ducks, and two three-hundred-pound pigs will capture the imagination of anyone who has ever considered leaving the city behind for a more natural lifestyle.

Synopsis:

Dee Williamsand#8217;s life changed in an instant, with a near-death experience in the aisle of her local grocery store. Diagnosed with a heart condition at age forty-one, she was all too suddenly reminded that life is short, time is precious, and she wanted to be spending hers with the people and things she truly loved. That included the beautiful sprawling house in the Pacific Northwest she had painstakingly restoredand#151;but, increasingly, it did not include the mortgage payments, constant repairs, and general time-suck of home ownership. A new sense of clarity began to take hold: Just what was all this stuff for? Multiple extra rooms, a kitchen stocked with rarely used appliances, were things that couldnand#8217;t compare with the financial freedom and the ultimate luxuryand#151;timeand#151;that would come with downsizing.

Deciding to build an eighty-four-square-foot houseand#151;on her own, from the ground upand#151;was just the beginning of building a new life. Williams can now list everything she owns on one sheet of paper, her monthly housekeeping bills amount to about eight dollars, and it takes her approximately ten minutes to clean the entire house. Itand#8217;s left her with more time to spend with family and friends, and given her freedom to head out for adventure at a momentand#8217;s notice, or watch the clouds and sunset while drinking a beer on her (yes, tiny) front porch.

The lessons Williams learned from her and#147;ahaand#8221; moment post-trauma apply to all of us, every day, regardless of whether or not we decide to discard all our worldly belongings. Part how-to, part personal memoir, The Big Tiny is an utterly seductive meditation on the benefits of slowing down, scaling back, and appreciating the truly important things in life.

Synopsis:

andldquo;One of New York Times Top 10 Books of 2009andrdquo; (Dwight Garner)

andquot;Captivating... By turns edgy, moving, and hilarious, Farm City marks the debut of a striking new voice in American writing.andquot; --Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and Food Rules

When Novella Carpenter--captivated by the idea of backyard self-sufficiency as the daughter of two back-to-the-earth hippies--moves to a ramshackle house in inner-city Oakland and discovers a weed-choked, garbage-strewn abandoned lot next door, she closes her eyes and pictures heirloom tomatoes, a beehive, and a chicken coop.

What starts out as a few egg-laying chickens leads to turkeys, geese, and ducks. And not long after, along came two 300-pound pigs. And no, these charming and eccentric animals arenandrsquo;t pets. Novella is raising these animals for dinner.

An unforgettably charming memoir, full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmerandrsquo;s tips, and a great deal of heart, Farm City offers a beautiful mediation on what we give up to live the way we do today.

About the Author

Novella Carpenter grew up in rural Idaho and Washington State. She went to University of Washington in Seattle where she majored in Biology and English. She later studied under Michael Pollan at Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism for two years. She's had many odd jobs including: assassin bug handler, book editor, media projectionist, hamster oocyte collector, and most recently, journalist. Her writing has appeared in Salon.com, Saveur.com, sfgate.com (the SF Chronicle's website), and Mother Jones. She has been cultivating her farm in the city for over ten years now, and her neighbors still think she's crazy. It all started with a few chickens, then some bees, until she had a full-blown farm near downtown Oakland, where she lives today.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

boehnlei, October 31, 2011 (view all comments by boehnlei)
This book was on my list for quite awhile when it was still in hard-back. Novella's entertaining prose was both thought-provoking and hilarious, letting her readers into her everyday, dirty, though rewarding life as an urban farmer. Her voice is very distinct, often sarcastic, but her story and perseverance is inspiring. It made me want to run outside and start planing- or at least learn more about it! Plus, it is an interesting counterargument to vegetarianism- raising your own meat cuts down on so many of the resources it takes to buy meat at the store and is bound to make life interesting.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
TDB, January 27, 2011 (view all comments by TDB)
"Farm City", by Novella Carpenter, is quite an interesting book. I'd casually heard of the title and since urban and farming, to me at least, seemed an oxymoron, I read it to see the hype about the book. She's a very hardworking, creative, and self-sufficient woman. She is a bit quirky, but who isn't? Kudos to her for going after the simpler life, although in an urban environment. I personally would not eat or raise neither pigs nor rabbits for food, but she did this successfully (chickens also) all the while holding down job(s), and tending to a large city garden. Well written account.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
Jaw, August 16, 2010 (view all comments by Jaw)
With the recent emphasis on home gardens this book is very timely. Novella Carpenter, the daughter of two hippies, loves gardening & raising chickens, rabbits, ducks, geese, turkeys & even pigs. She loves the city & manages to farm in a rough section of Oakland. She plants heirloom seeds, builds chicken brooders & learns to butcher the animals she raises. This "urban homesteader" writes a book that is entertaining and informational at the same time. It all takes place on an empty lot next to her apartment & eventually spreads onto her deck & into her live quarters. I love the way her farming in the city brings together all the unforgettable characters in her neighborhood. I highly recommend this autobiography.
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View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143117285
Author:
Carpenter, Novella
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Author:
Williams, Dee
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Agriculture - General
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 b/w illustrations
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.52x5.48x.59 in. .53 lbs.
Age Level:
17-17

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Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143117285 Reviews:
"Review" by , "By turns edgy, moving, and hilarious."
"Synopsis" by , An unforgettably charming memoir, Farm City is full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmer's tips, and a great deal of heart. When Novella Carpenter — captivated by the idea of backyard self-sufficiency — moved to inner city Oakland and discovered a weed-choked, garbage- strewn abandoned lot next door to her house, she closed her eyes and pictured heirloom tomatoes and a chicken coop. The story of how her urban farm grew from a few chickens to one populated with turkeys, geese, rabbits, ducks, and two three-hundred-pound pigs will capture the imagination of anyone who has ever considered leaving the city behind for a more natural lifestyle.
"Synopsis" by ,
Dee Williamsand#8217;s life changed in an instant, with a near-death experience in the aisle of her local grocery store. Diagnosed with a heart condition at age forty-one, she was all too suddenly reminded that life is short, time is precious, and she wanted to be spending hers with the people and things she truly loved. That included the beautiful sprawling house in the Pacific Northwest she had painstakingly restoredand#151;but, increasingly, it did not include the mortgage payments, constant repairs, and general time-suck of home ownership. A new sense of clarity began to take hold: Just what was all this stuff for? Multiple extra rooms, a kitchen stocked with rarely used appliances, were things that couldnand#8217;t compare with the financial freedom and the ultimate luxuryand#151;timeand#151;that would come with downsizing.

Deciding to build an eighty-four-square-foot houseand#151;on her own, from the ground upand#151;was just the beginning of building a new life. Williams can now list everything she owns on one sheet of paper, her monthly housekeeping bills amount to about eight dollars, and it takes her approximately ten minutes to clean the entire house. Itand#8217;s left her with more time to spend with family and friends, and given her freedom to head out for adventure at a momentand#8217;s notice, or watch the clouds and sunset while drinking a beer on her (yes, tiny) front porch.

The lessons Williams learned from her and#147;ahaand#8221; moment post-trauma apply to all of us, every day, regardless of whether or not we decide to discard all our worldly belongings. Part how-to, part personal memoir, The Big Tiny is an utterly seductive meditation on the benefits of slowing down, scaling back, and appreciating the truly important things in life.

"Synopsis" by ,
andldquo;One of New York Times Top 10 Books of 2009andrdquo; (Dwight Garner)

andquot;Captivating... By turns edgy, moving, and hilarious, Farm City marks the debut of a striking new voice in American writing.andquot; --Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and Food Rules

When Novella Carpenter--captivated by the idea of backyard self-sufficiency as the daughter of two back-to-the-earth hippies--moves to a ramshackle house in inner-city Oakland and discovers a weed-choked, garbage-strewn abandoned lot next door, she closes her eyes and pictures heirloom tomatoes, a beehive, and a chicken coop.

What starts out as a few egg-laying chickens leads to turkeys, geese, and ducks. And not long after, along came two 300-pound pigs. And no, these charming and eccentric animals arenandrsquo;t pets. Novella is raising these animals for dinner.

An unforgettably charming memoir, full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmerandrsquo;s tips, and a great deal of heart, Farm City offers a beautiful mediation on what we give up to live the way we do today.

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