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1 Burnside US History- Colonial America

Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul: Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty

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Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul: Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A revelatory look at how Roger Williams shaped the nature of religion, political power, and individual rights in America.

For four hundred years, Americans have wrestled with and fought over two concepts that define the nature of the nation: the proper relation between church and state and between a free individual and the state. These debates began with the extraordinary thought and struggles of Roger Williams, who had an unparalleled understanding of the conflict between a government that justified itself by "reason of state"-i.e. national security-and its perceived "will of God" and the "ancient rights and liberties" of individuals.

This is a story of power, set against Puritan America and the English Civil War. Williams's interactions with King James, Francis Bacon, Oliver Cromwell, and his mentor Edward Coke set his course, but his fundamental ideas came to fruition in America, as Williams, though a Puritan, collided with John Winthrop's vision of his "City upon a Hill."

Acclaimed historian John M. Barry explores the development of these fundamental ideas through the story of the man who was the first to link religious freedom to individual liberty, and who created in America the first government and society on earth informed by those beliefs. The story is essential to the continuing debate over how we define the role of religion and political power in modern American life.

Synopsis:

A revelatory look at the separation of church and state in America—from the New York Times bestselling author of The Great Influenza
 
For four hundred years, Americans have fought over the proper relationships between church and state and between a free individual and the state. This is the story of the first battle in that war of ideas, a battle that led to the writing of the First Amendment and that continues to define the issue of the separation of church and state today. It began with religious persecution and ended in revolution, and along the way it defined the nature of America and of individual liberty. Acclaimed historian John M. Barry explores the development of these fundamental ideas through the story of Roger Williams, who was the first to link religious freedom to individual liberty, and who created in America the first government and society on earth informed by those beliefs. This book is essential to understanding the continuing debate over the role of religion and political power in modern life.

Synopsis:

At the height of WWI, historyandrsquo;s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

About the Author

John M. Barry is the author of four previous books, including the highly acclaimed and award-winning Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America.

Table of Contents

Prologue

Part I: The Warriors

Part II: The Swarm

Part III: The Tinderbox

Part IV: It Begins

Part V: Explosion

Part VI: The Pestilence

Part VII: The Race

Part VIII: The Tolling Of The Bell

Part IX: Lingerer

Part X: Endgame

Afterword

Acknowledgments

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143122883
Author:
Barry, John M.
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
World
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w map in front matter
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
5 x 7 x 1 in 0.5 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

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Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » US History » Colonial America

Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul: Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty Used Trade Paper
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Product details 560 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143122883 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
A revelatory look at the separation of church and state in America—from the New York Times bestselling author of The Great Influenza
 
For four hundred years, Americans have fought over the proper relationships between church and state and between a free individual and the state. This is the story of the first battle in that war of ideas, a battle that led to the writing of the First Amendment and that continues to define the issue of the separation of church and state today. It began with religious persecution and ended in revolution, and along the way it defined the nature of America and of individual liberty. Acclaimed historian John M. Barry explores the development of these fundamental ideas through the story of Roger Williams, who was the first to link religious freedom to individual liberty, and who created in America the first government and society on earth informed by those beliefs. This book is essential to understanding the continuing debate over the role of religion and political power in modern life.

"Synopsis" by ,

At the height of WWI, historyandrsquo;s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

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