The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | July 24, 2014

Jessica Valenti: IMG Full Frontal Feminism Revisited



It is arguably the worst and best time to be a feminist. In the years since I first wrote Full Frontal Feminism, we've seen a huge cultural shift in... Continue »
  1. $11.90 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$4.98
List price: $8.95
Sale Mass Market
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z
2 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z

The Color Purple

by

The Color Purple Cover

ISBN13: 9780156031820
ISBN10: 0156031825
Condition:
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

[Banner] Now a Tony Award-Winning Broadway Musical

 

The Color Purple is the story of two sisters—one a missionary to Africa and the other a child wife living in the South—who remain loyal to one another across time, distance, and silence. Beautifully imagined and deeply compassionate, this classic of American literature is rich with passion, pain, inspiration, and an indomitable love of life.

"Intense emotional impact . . . Indelibly affecting . . . Alice Walker is a lavishly gifted writer."—The New York Times Book Review

"Places Walker in the company of Faulkner."—The Nation

"Superb . . . A work to stand beside literature of any time and place."—San Francisco Chronicle

"The Color Purple is an American novel of permanent importance."—Newsweek

"Marvelous characters . . . A story of revelation . . . One of the great books of our time."--Essence

 

[banner] Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award

 

 

 [bio]

Bestselling novelist Alice Walker is also the author of three collections of short stories, three collections of essays, six volumes of poetry and several children's books. Her books have been translated into more than two dozen languages. Born in Eatonton, Georgia, Walker now lives in northern California.

Synopsis:

Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate, and continuing over the course of her marriage to "Mister," a brutal man who terrorizes her. Celie eventually learns that her abusive husband has been keeping her sister's letters from her and the rage she feels, combined with an example of love and independence provided by her close friend Shug, pushes her finally toward an awakening of her creative and loving self.

Synopsis:

Winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1983, this feminist novel about an abused and uneducated black woman's struggle for empowerment was praised for the depth of its female characters and for its eloquent use of black English vernacular.

About the Author

Alice Walker won the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award for her novel The Color Purple, which was preceded by The Third Life of Grange Copeland and Meridian. Her other bestselling novels include By the Light of My Father's Smile, Possessing the Secret of Joy and The Temple of My Familiar. She is also the author of two collections of short stories, three collections of essays, five volumes of poetry and several children's books. Her books have been translated into more than two dozen languages. Born in Eatonton, Georgia, Walker now lives in Northern California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

courtneysimonson, April 2, 2014 (view all comments by courtneysimonson)
The Color Purple by Alice Walker deals with the struggles of women during the early twentieth century and their desire to receive fair and equal treatment. The main character, Celie, writes for god about the abuse from her husband Mr.___ and later she writes to her sister Nettie, who is traveling around the world as a missionary. Nettie is one of the few people Celie trusts and this novel highlights Celie’s discovery of love and search for recollection and freedom. Throughout the story, Celie transforms herself from a housewife, into a strong independent woman.
This story is set in the southern part of Georgia during the early twentieth century. Males played a dominant role in the household during this time. In the book the main character, Celie is struggling to find happiness in her life. Growing up, her father abused her and she gave birth to two of his children. Celie later escapes the abuse of her father and gets married to Mr.___ who has ultimate control over her. He physically and verbally abuses Celie and he says “Men s’pose to wear the pants”. This quote shows that he believes men play the prominent role in the relationship. Mr.___ also has another woman on the side of Celie, Shug Avery. Shug wants to leave Mr.___ and Celie, but Celie tells Shug that he constantly hits her. Shug still leaves, but ends up returning home with a new Husband, Grady. Both Celie and Mr.___ are devastated that she is now married. Although Shug Avery is with Grady now, she is the first person to teach Celie how to love. Celie envies Shug and always comments about how perfect she is. The two females start to form a close friendship. Just like Celie desires, Shug starts to explain the meaning of love and life to Celie and the two become almost inseparable. “Us sleep like sisters, me and Shug” (146) The closer Celie gets to Shug, the more she learns about Mr.___ Celie’s sister Nettie had been writing Celie letters during all of her travels and she was hoping that Celie would receive the letters and reply to them. Later, Shug informs Celie that Mr.___ has been hiding her letters from Nettie. Celie is so mad at Mr.___ that she decides to leave him and travel to Tennessee with Shug and Grady. And now that she can finally read her sister’s letters she learns a lot about Nettie and what she has been doing. Nettie has been traveling with a couple, Samuel and Corrine. Also, they are accompanied by their adopted children Olivia and Adam. Through Nettie’s letters Celie learns that Olivia and Adam are her biological children. This is the part of the novel where Celie starts to become more independent and decides what she has to do in order to make herself feel happy. The ending of the story is heart warming and will leave readers on their feet.
The overall message of this story is that women should stand up against unfair treatments that they receive from men. Walker comments on the treatment of women and their ability to overcome it. The characters in this novel, especially the women, help each other learn how to love and how to find happiness. Each character found happiness in their own way. “I’m pore, I’m black, I may be ugly and can’t cook, a voice say to everything listening, but i’m here”. (207 ) Celie found her happiness by accepting who she is and learning to love herself and others. In this story and in this time period, women had to help each other overcome obstacles in order to make their lives better. The point of view in which this book is written in, gives the reader a more intimate look into the lives of Celie and Nettie. Alice Walker chose to write this book in the first person. The way that Celie writes, show the readers that she is uneducated. But the way that Nettie writes, shows the readers that she is somewhat educated and is interested in more thought out ideas. Although I did enjoy the personal perspectives of Celie and Nettie, but I think that it would’ve been nice to hear Shug Avery and Mr.___’s point of views.
The Color Purple by Alice Walker is an excellent story that highlights Celie’s journey of becoming independent and receiving equal rights. In the end, Celie came even closer to the equality that she ventured to. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a great love and discovery story. The book has a lot of ups and downs, but it ultimately teaches the reader that everyone has the ability to love and to create their own happiness.

Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
Krista H, May 15, 2011 (view all comments by Krista H)
The Color Purple, written by Alice Walker is a novel of revelation for the inspiring story itself, but it also serves as an inspiration to readers of all backgrounds. Walker’s background is what makes her novel stand out with emotion because many of the occurances in the novel closely emulate part of her life. Finally, it is Walker’s view of God that allows the character of Celie to grow in her faith and confidence alike. This elegantly written novel will stand the test of time for the characters and the world Alice Walker develops.
The Color Purple begins with several letters to God from Celie. She writes letters to God because only He will listen to her; no one pays attention to a poor, uneducated African American girl who is pregnant with her father’s second child. After having her two children taken away from her at birth by her father, Celie is given away to Mr____. He originally wanted Nettie, Celie’s sister, but she fled when Mr.____tried to marry her her at a young age. Celie never hears from her sister and assumes she is dead. Celie’s new husband, Mr.____, abuses her emotionally, physically, and sexually, while maintaining a relationship with a woman named Shug Avery. Shug is very beautiful and a singer who travels around the country. When Shug now a friend of Celie’s, inquires about Nettie, Celie’s sister, Shug mentions that Mr.____has been hiding letters Nettie sent to Celie over the past several years. Nettie’s letters to Celie detail her missionary work with a family from her home state of Georgia. After many years of missionary work with this family in Africa, Nettie informs the parents of the family she has been working with that she is the biological aunt to their two adopted children. After years of writing letters Celie stops writing to God and begins to write to Nettie, although Nettie never receives these letters. Celie does receive her sister’s however, detailing of the trials and hardship of the missionary life in Africa. In a final letter, Celie addresses the letter, “Dear God. Dear stars, dear trees, dear sky, dear peoples. Dear Everything. Dear God.” and in this final letter Nettie returns home for the first time in many years. The women have both grown old, but they mention that they have never felt so young. The entirety of the novel is a stream of consciousness of Celie and Nettie’s emotions, thoughts, trials, and tribulations; all inspiring.
The Color Purple successfully inspires readers while portraying the pain filled life of Celie and other African American women in the 1940s. This book acts as a teaching work of art. The stories Celie tells are the pathway to her happiness. Because of the changes she makes, Celie grows in confidence and in spirituality. This book teaches readers to express emotions openly like Celie does in her letters. Walker poses readers with a challenge; do what you can with what you have, where you are. Celie makes the most of what she has and finds satisfaction in that. Newsweek says, “The Color Purple” is an American novel of permanent importance.” The intense emotional impact on readers and the revelations of characters are what make this book so important. A part of Walker’s background can be seen in several different characters in The Color Purple.
Born in a small town in Georgia, Walker’s life already is reflected in her novel that takes place in a small rural town of the same state. Her experiences with racism in the American South have deeply impacted the characters and occurrences in the novel. When she was only 17 years old, Walker became active in the African American civil rights movement. This event in her life closely reflects Shug Avery’s desire to have a voice and challenge authority in the search of equality. Soon after joining, Walker became an exchange student in Uganda. This part of her life is brought to life through the character of Nettie and the missionary work in Africa. While in Africa, Walker becomes inexpertly pregnant just as Celie become pregnant with two unasked for children. Most interesting to me however, is Celie’s relationship with God.
In her very last letter to God, Celie titles it, “Dear God. Drear stars, dear trees, dear sky, dear peoples. Dear Everything. Dear God” (291). Celie turns to God for support because she trusts He will listen to her when no one else will. She does not have a clear image of God, but she has at least a grain of faith that He exists. God is a man however, and after guidance from Shug, Celie begins to disregard God because he is a man and Celie believes that He is not listening to her, otherwise her life would be better. When Celie formulates her own image and beliefs in God, she is proving her independence and her powerful voice. Celie grows in faith when she develops her own image of God, rather than listening to what others says. Celie has learned to have her own opinions, and with the passage of time, she learns to stop listening to what everyone else says. God has helped her grow in her own way. Everyone has a slightly different image of God and for some a drastically different idea of Him, but with Celie’s example of independence in faith I believe readers are given the right to have their own faith independence.
Alice Walker writes with a heavy influence from her personal life experiences and develops inspiring characters like Shug and Celie. She writes to tell an empowering story, but more importantly she teaches the power of independence and individual voice, especially a growing independence in faith. The Color Purple will be read for years to come because of its powerful messages in literature.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780156031820
Author:
Walker, Alice
Publisher:
Harvest Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Sisters
Subject:
Adult child sexual abuse victims
Subject:
Theater - Broadway & Musical Revue
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market Paperbound
Publication Date:
20061131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 9 to 12
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
6.88 x 4.19 in 0.41 lb
Age Level:
from 14

Other books you might like

  1. Plainsong (Vintage Contemporaries)
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  2. One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest Used Mass Market $4.95
  3. Snow Falling on Cedars
    Used Trade Paper $3.50
  4. Their eyes were watching God :a novel Used Trade Paper $2.50
  5. Beloved Used Hardcover $2.95
  6. Ceremony
    Used Trade Paper $5.95

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books
Young Adult » General

The Color Purple Sale Mass Market
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.98 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Harvest Books - English 9780156031820 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate, and continuing over the course of her marriage to "Mister," a brutal man who terrorizes her. Celie eventually learns that her abusive husband has been keeping her sister's letters from her and the rage she feels, combined with an example of love and independence provided by her close friend Shug, pushes her finally toward an awakening of her creative and loving self.

"Synopsis" by , Winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1983, this feminist novel about an abused and uneducated black woman's struggle for empowerment was praised for the depth of its female characters and for its eloquent use of black English vernacular.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.