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    Hanya Yanagihara: IMG Nine Tips for Finishing That Novel



    My second novel, A Little Life — about a group of men in New York and their friendship over the course of 30 years — will be published... Continue »
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1 Burnside Psychology- History and Politics

This title in other editions

Madness: A Brief History

by

Madness: A Brief History Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Picture your twenty-first birthday. Did you have a party? If so, do you remember who was there? Now step back: how clear are those memories? Should we trust them to be accurate, or is there a chance that you’re remembering incorrectly? And where have the many details you can no longer recall gone? Are they hidden somewhere in your brain, or are they gone forever?

Such questions have fascinated scientists for hundreds of years, and, as Alison Winter shows in Memory: Fragments of a Modern History, the answers have changed dramatically in just the past century. Tracing the cultural and scientific history of our understanding of memory, Winter explores early metaphors that likened memory to a filing cabinet; later, she shows, that cabinet was replaced by the image of a reel of film, ever available for playback. That model, too, was eventually superseded, replaced by the current understanding of memory as the result of an extremely complicated, brain-wide web of cells and systems that together assemble our pasts. Winter introduces us to innovative scientists and sensationalistic seekers, and, drawing on evidence ranging from scientific papers to diaries to movies, explores the way that new understandings from the laboratory have seeped out into psychiatrists' offices, courtrooms, and the culture at large. Along the way, she investigates the sensational battles over the validity of repressed memories that raged through the 1980s and shows us how changes in technology—such as the emergence of recording devices and computers—have again and again altered the way we conceptualize, and even try to study, the ways we remember.

Packed with fascinating details and curious episodes from the convoluted history of memory science, Memory is a book you'll remember long after you close its cover.

Synopsis:

Looking back on his confinement to Bethlem, Restoration playwright Nathaniel Lee declared: "They called me mad, and I called them mad, and damn them, they outvoted me." As Roy Porter shows in Madness: A Brief History, thinking about who qualifies as insane, what causes mental illness, and how such illness should be treated has varied wildly throughout recorded history, sometimes veering dangerously close to the arbitrariness Lee describes and often encompassing cures considerably worse than the illness itself.

Drawing upon eyewitness accounts of doctors, writers, artists, and the mad themselves, Roy Porter tells the story of our changing notions of insanity and of the treatments for mental illness that have been employed from antiquity to the present day. Beginning with 5,000-year-old skulls with tiny holes bored in them (to allow demons to escape), through conceptions of madness as an acute phase in the trial of souls, as an imbalance of "the humors," as the "divine fury" of creative genius, or as the malfunctioning of brain chemistry, Porter shows the many ways madness has been perceived and misperceived in every historical period. He takes us on a fascinating round of treatments, ranging from exorcism and therapeutic terror--including immersion in a tub of eels--to the first asylums, shock therapy, the birth of psychoanalysis, and the current use of psychotropic drugs.

Throughout, Madness: A Brief History offers a balanced view, showing both the humane attempts to help the insane as well as the ridiculous and often cruel misunderstanding that have bedeviled our efforts to heal the mind of its myriad afflictions.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-233) and index.

About the Author

Roy Porter is Professor of the Social History of Medicine at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London. He is the author of over 80 books, including Enlightenment: Britain and the Creation of the Modern World and A Social History of Madness.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

2. Madness, Gods, and Demons

3. The Rationality of Madness

4. Fools and Folly

5. Locking up the Mad

6. The Rise of Psychiatry

7. The Mad

8. The Century of Psychoanalysis

9. Conclusion: Modern Times, Ancient Problems?

Product Details

ISBN:
9780192802675
Author:
Porter, Roy
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
Winter, Alison
Author:
null, Roy
Location:
Oxford
Subject:
History
Subject:
World
Subject:
Mental Illness
Subject:
History - World
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
History, Other | History of Medicine
Subject:
Mental illness -- History.
Subject:
Mental illness -- Treatment -- History.
Subject:
Psychology : General
Subject:
Psychology - Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series Volume:
no. 1
Publication Date:
20030531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
5 pt. type
Pages:
330
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.8 in

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » History
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » History and Politics
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
History and Social Science » World History » General

Madness: A Brief History Used Trade Paper
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Product details 330 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780192802675 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Looking back on his confinement to Bethlem, Restoration playwright Nathaniel Lee declared: "They called me mad, and I called them mad, and damn them, they outvoted me." As Roy Porter shows in Madness: A Brief History, thinking about who qualifies as insane, what causes mental illness, and how such illness should be treated has varied wildly throughout recorded history, sometimes veering dangerously close to the arbitrariness Lee describes and often encompassing cures considerably worse than the illness itself.

Drawing upon eyewitness accounts of doctors, writers, artists, and the mad themselves, Roy Porter tells the story of our changing notions of insanity and of the treatments for mental illness that have been employed from antiquity to the present day. Beginning with 5,000-year-old skulls with tiny holes bored in them (to allow demons to escape), through conceptions of madness as an acute phase in the trial of souls, as an imbalance of "the humors," as the "divine fury" of creative genius, or as the malfunctioning of brain chemistry, Porter shows the many ways madness has been perceived and misperceived in every historical period. He takes us on a fascinating round of treatments, ranging from exorcism and therapeutic terror--including immersion in a tub of eels--to the first asylums, shock therapy, the birth of psychoanalysis, and the current use of psychotropic drugs.

Throughout, Madness: A Brief History offers a balanced view, showing both the humane attempts to help the insane as well as the ridiculous and often cruel misunderstanding that have bedeviled our efforts to heal the mind of its myriad afflictions.

"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-233) and index.
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