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Vanity, Vitality, and Virility: The Science Behind the Products You Love to Buy

Vanity, Vitality, and Virility: The Science Behind the Products You Love to Buy Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


Have you ever wondered whether wrinkles can be smoothed away, how lipstick can shimmer, why diamonds are a girl's best friend, how best to kill germs, and why roads are getting less noisy? Vanity, Vitality, and Virility will give you answers to all of these questions, and many more besides.

In Vanity, Vitality, and Virility, acclaimed popular-science writer John Emsley explans the nautre and behaviour of around 40 ingredients that play important roles in every aspect of modern living: there are chapters on cosmetics, food, sex, hygiene, depression, and on four unexpected ways in which modern products improve our lives. So if you have ever asked yourself whether cosmetics can deliver what they promise, whether certain spreads really can reduce cholesterol, whether nitrates in water are a cause of cancer, whether your sex life can be improved, and whether Prozac is as safe as they say, dive into Vanity, Vitality, and Virility and discover things you always wanted to know: but didn't know who to ask!

Review:

"You are standing in the supermarket holding two bottles of sunscreen. One claims to have titanium dioxide, the other something called OMC. What are these mysterious chemicals and which works better? Enter Emsley, Cambridge University science writer in residence, who demystifies the benefits of chemistry from a catalogue of over 30 chemicals that we encounter every day. His subjects jump from lipstick and sunscreen to trans-fats and vitamin C, bleach, Prozac, baby diapers and V of the title). Emsley includes the sources and uses of all the chemicals, which can read like encyclopedia entries, as well as histories of each chemical's discovery and occasional misuses. To this he adds a few morality tales of chemical witch-hunts in the media, such as the unsubstantiated accusation that aluminum causes Alzheimer's. The book can be read cover to cover or used as a reference, but either way, even chemists will find out some surprising facts, such as that scurvy was for a time treated with sulfuric acid. The more complicated chemistry is relegated to a glossary, but unexplained scientific terms pop up with regularity in the text. Emsley gets on his soapbox in the postscript, asking for a little gratitude for the much maligned chemical industry, whose benefits he has already demonstrated. Given the occasional detours into technical language, however, his audience may be predominantly the chemically inclined. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Academic and author Emsley reveals the chemical secrets behind the products in your cabinet and expert pronouncements in your consciousness. Topics include analyzing lipstick, beating gravity with the alpha-hydroxy acids in skin products, figuring out whether we should consume more or less foods with trans-fatty acids, fighting for and with the nitric oxide in Viagra, winning and losing the war against germs, evaluating and enduring certain chemicals in the treatment of depression and Alzheimer's Disease, and discerning the ways of the wily polymer in roads and chewing gun. Emsley includes a glossary and a list of resources for further reading once we get over what we have been doing to ourselves with selenium.
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

'Vanity, Vitality, and Virility' is a portrait gallery of chemicals involved in our everyday life, from Viagra and selenium to whispering asphalt, nappies, and chewing gum. It explains the science behind many products and is by the author of 'The Consumer's Good Chemical Guide', 'Molecules at an Exhibition', and 'Nature's Building Blocks'.

Synopsis:

What is the secret of shower cleaners? How does the dangerous explosive nitroglycerin ward off heart attacks? And what medicines, usually prescribed for other purposes, are said to produce the ultimate orgasm?

In Vanity, Vitality, and Virility, award-winning science writer John Emsley offers a fascinating behind-the-scenes account of 30 chemicals that we use everyday to make ourselves more beautiful, to improve our diet and sexual pleasure, to kill germs, and to ward off depression and other mental illnesses. Emsley looks at common compounds such as alpha-hydroxy acids, vitamin C, chlorine bleach, and Prozac, telling us if they work, how they work, and how they were discovered. Indeed, the book is packed with useful information and easy-to-digest science, and Emsley relates it all with a light touch that delights in the odd fact or amusing anecdote. Thus we learn of the "vitamin C tights" sold in Japan to make your legs more beautiful (they don't work) and of the whimsical Hungarian scientist who first isolated vitamin C and wanted to name it "godnose"--because he had no idea what the compound was. We discover that Cleopatra was right to bath in milk, which is filled with alpha-hydroxy acids. And we read about the unforgettable British researcher who demonstrated a powerful new drug for male erections at a Las Vegas convention--injecting himself with the compound and then "displaying the results" to a stunned lecture hall.

As with the much-loved Nature's Building Blocks, in John Emsley's hands, chemistry comes alive. Anyone curious about the ingredients in the products we use, and everyone fascinated with science, will be enthralled by this book.

About the Author

John Emsley is Science Writer in Residence in the Chemistry Department at the University of Cambridge. He wrote a "Molecule of the Month" column for the Independent for many years, received a Glaxo award for science writing and the Chemical Industries Association's President's Award for science communication. His books include Molecules in an Exhibition and Nature's Building Blocks.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. Vanity - no more wrinkles?

2. Vitality - food for thought

3. Virility, sterility, and Viagra

4. Germs warfare

5. It's all in the mind

6. Polymers in unlikely guises

Postscript - a risk worth taking?

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780192805096
Subtitle:
The Science behind the Products You Love to Buy
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Author:
Emsley, John
Author:
null, John
Location:
New York
Subject:
Chemistry - General
Subject:
Chemistry | Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Publication Date:
May 2004
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 illus.
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
6.38 x 9.47 x 1 in 1.238 lb

Related Subjects


Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Science Reference » Sociology of Science
Science and Mathematics » Chemistry » General

Vanity, Vitality, and Virility: The Science Behind the Products You Love to Buy
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 272 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780192805096 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "You are standing in the supermarket holding two bottles of sunscreen. One claims to have titanium dioxide, the other something called OMC. What are these mysterious chemicals and which works better? Enter Emsley, Cambridge University science writer in residence, who demystifies the benefits of chemistry from a catalogue of over 30 chemicals that we encounter every day. His subjects jump from lipstick and sunscreen to trans-fats and vitamin C, bleach, Prozac, baby diapers and V of the title). Emsley includes the sources and uses of all the chemicals, which can read like encyclopedia entries, as well as histories of each chemical's discovery and occasional misuses. To this he adds a few morality tales of chemical witch-hunts in the media, such as the unsubstantiated accusation that aluminum causes Alzheimer's. The book can be read cover to cover or used as a reference, but either way, even chemists will find out some surprising facts, such as that scurvy was for a time treated with sulfuric acid. The more complicated chemistry is relegated to a glossary, but unexplained scientific terms pop up with regularity in the text. Emsley gets on his soapbox in the postscript, asking for a little gratitude for the much maligned chemical industry, whose benefits he has already demonstrated. Given the occasional detours into technical language, however, his audience may be predominantly the chemically inclined. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , 'Vanity, Vitality, and Virility' is a portrait gallery of chemicals involved in our everyday life, from Viagra and selenium to whispering asphalt, nappies, and chewing gum. It explains the science behind many products and is by the author of 'The Consumer's Good Chemical Guide', 'Molecules at an Exhibition', and 'Nature's Building Blocks'.
"Synopsis" by , What is the secret of shower cleaners? How does the dangerous explosive nitroglycerin ward off heart attacks? And what medicines, usually prescribed for other purposes, are said to produce the ultimate orgasm?

In Vanity, Vitality, and Virility, award-winning science writer John Emsley offers a fascinating behind-the-scenes account of 30 chemicals that we use everyday to make ourselves more beautiful, to improve our diet and sexual pleasure, to kill germs, and to ward off depression and other mental illnesses. Emsley looks at common compounds such as alpha-hydroxy acids, vitamin C, chlorine bleach, and Prozac, telling us if they work, how they work, and how they were discovered. Indeed, the book is packed with useful information and easy-to-digest science, and Emsley relates it all with a light touch that delights in the odd fact or amusing anecdote. Thus we learn of the "vitamin C tights" sold in Japan to make your legs more beautiful (they don't work) and of the whimsical Hungarian scientist who first isolated vitamin C and wanted to name it "godnose"--because he had no idea what the compound was. We discover that Cleopatra was right to bath in milk, which is filled with alpha-hydroxy acids. And we read about the unforgettable British researcher who demonstrated a powerful new drug for male erections at a Las Vegas convention--injecting himself with the compound and then "displaying the results" to a stunned lecture hall.

As with the much-loved Nature's Building Blocks, in John Emsley's hands, chemistry comes alive. Anyone curious about the ingredients in the products we use, and everyone fascinated with science, will be enthralled by this book.

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