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2 Local Warehouse Botany- Botanical Exploration and Biography

This title in other editions

Flower Hunters

by

Flower Hunters Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From geraniums to begonias, the common plants that often adorn backyard gardens are rarely native to our region. The same goes for many of the diverse and delicious fruits and vegetables that grace our dinner tables. We take their accessibility and ubiquity for granted, unaware of the great debt we owe to the naturalists and explorers who traveled around the world in search of these then unusual plants and brought back samples and seedsand#8212;along with fantastic stories. In The Plant Hunters, Carolyn Fry pays homage to those whose obsession with plants gave rise to our own passion for botanicals and gardening.

Lavishly illustrated with more than one hundred images from the archives at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, The Plant Hunters offers an accessible history of plant exploration and discovery through short, informative entries. From the naturalists of Alexander the Greatand#8217;s entourage to pioneering botanists such as Joseph Hooker, Joseph Banks, and Alexander von Humboldt, Fryand#8217;s history covers the globe in its celebration of our fascination with plants. She shows how coconut trees and numerous fruits and vegetables were spread from one country to many, and the significant role that newly discovered plants, including tulips, tea, and rubber, have played in economic history. The Plant Hunters also traces the establishment of botanical gardens and the many uses of plants in medicine. In addition to stunning botanical drawings, the book features several unique facsimiles, including a letter from Carl Linnaeus, the father of taxonomy; extracts from Joseph Hookerand#8217;s notebooks; an extract from the orchid sketchbook of John Day; and an original map of Kew Gardens made in 1740 by Jean Rocque.

This gorgeous and entertaining history will be a perfect gift for gardeners, and anyone fascinated by the intersection of the histories of science and discovery.

Synopsis:

The flower hunters were intrepid explorers - remarkable, eccentric men and women who scoured the world in search of extraordinary plants from the middle of the seventeenth to the end of the nineteenth century, and helped establish the new science of botany. For these adventurers, the search for new, undiscovered plant specimens was something worth risking - and losing - their lives for.

From the Douglas-fir and the monkey puzzle tree, to exotic orchids and azaleas, many of the plants that are now so familiar to us were found in distant regions of the globe, often in wild and unexplored country, in impenetrable jungle, and in the face of hunger, disease, and hostile locals. It was specimens like these, smuggled home by the flower hunters, that helped build the great botanical collections, and lay the foundations for the revolution in our understanding of the natural world that was to follow. Here, the adventures of eleven such explorers are brought to life, describing not only their extraordinary daring and dedication, but alos the lasting impact of their discoveries both on science, and on the landscapes and gardens that we see today.

Synopsis:

The flower hunters were intrepid explorers - remarkable, eccentric men and women who scoured the world in search of extraordinary plants from the middle of the seventeenth to the end of the nineteenth century, and helped establish the new science of botany. For these adventurers, the search for new, undiscovered plant specimens was something worth risking - and often losing - their lives for.

From the Douglas-fir and the monkey puzzle tree, to exotic orchids and azaleas, many of the plants that are now so familiar to us were found in distant regions of the globe, often in wild and unexplored country, in impenetrable jungle, and in the face of hunger, disease, and hostile locals. It was specimens like these, smuggled home by the flower hunters, that helped build the great botanical collections, and lay the foundations for the revolution in our understanding of the natural world that was to follow. Here, the adventures of eleven such explorers are brought to life, describing not only their extraordinary daring and dedication, but also the lasting impact of their discoveries both on science, and on the landscapes and gardens that we see today.

About the Author

John and Mary Gribbin are popular science writers who have collaborated on many books, including Richard Feynman: A Life in Science, Annus Mirabilis: 1905, Albert Einstein, and the Theory of Relativity, and Big Numbers: A Mind Expanding Trip to Infinity and Back. They live in East Sussex, in the UK. Books by the same authors:

Fitzroy: The Remarkable Story of Darwin's Captain and the Invention of the Weather Forecast, 2004

Ice

Table of Contents

Prologue John Ray (1627-1705)

1. Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778)

2. Joseph Banks (1743-1820)

3. Francis Masson (1741-1805) and Carl Peter Thunberg (1742-1828)

4. David Douglas (1799-1834)

5. William Lobb (1809-1864) and Thomas Lobb (1817-1894)

6. Robert Fortune (1812-1880)

7. Marianne North (1830-1890)

8. Richard Spruce (1817-1893)

9. Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780192807182
Subtitle:
The Adventures of the World's Greatest Botanical Explorers
Author:
Gribbin, John
Author:
Gribbin, Mary
Author:
Fry, Carolyn
Publisher:
University Of Chicago Press
Subject:
Expeditions & Discoveries
Subject:
Life Sciences - Botany
Subject:
History
Subject:
Plant collecting
Subject:
Scientists - General
Subject:
Botanists
Subject:
Plant collectors
Subject:
History, Other | History of Science
Subject:
Flowers - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20130923
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Two 8pp color plate sections
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
12 x 9 x 1 in
Age Level:
How a change of climate made us human, 2003 The Un

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Related Subjects

Home and Garden » Gardening » History and Theory
Science and Mathematics » Botany » Botanical Exploration and Biographies

Flower Hunters Used Hardcover
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$8.95 In Stock
Product details 64 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780192807182 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The flower hunters were intrepid explorers - remarkable, eccentric men and women who scoured the world in search of extraordinary plants from the middle of the seventeenth to the end of the nineteenth century, and helped establish the new science of botany. For these adventurers, the search for new, undiscovered plant specimens was something worth risking - and losing - their lives for.

From the Douglas-fir and the monkey puzzle tree, to exotic orchids and azaleas, many of the plants that are now so familiar to us were found in distant regions of the globe, often in wild and unexplored country, in impenetrable jungle, and in the face of hunger, disease, and hostile locals. It was specimens like these, smuggled home by the flower hunters, that helped build the great botanical collections, and lay the foundations for the revolution in our understanding of the natural world that was to follow. Here, the adventures of eleven such explorers are brought to life, describing not only their extraordinary daring and dedication, but alos the lasting impact of their discoveries both on science, and on the landscapes and gardens that we see today.

"Synopsis" by , The flower hunters were intrepid explorers - remarkable, eccentric men and women who scoured the world in search of extraordinary plants from the middle of the seventeenth to the end of the nineteenth century, and helped establish the new science of botany. For these adventurers, the search for new, undiscovered plant specimens was something worth risking - and often losing - their lives for.

From the Douglas-fir and the monkey puzzle tree, to exotic orchids and azaleas, many of the plants that are now so familiar to us were found in distant regions of the globe, often in wild and unexplored country, in impenetrable jungle, and in the face of hunger, disease, and hostile locals. It was specimens like these, smuggled home by the flower hunters, that helped build the great botanical collections, and lay the foundations for the revolution in our understanding of the natural world that was to follow. Here, the adventures of eleven such explorers are brought to life, describing not only their extraordinary daring and dedication, but also the lasting impact of their discoveries both on science, and on the landscapes and gardens that we see today.

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