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Win-Win Ecology: How the Earth's Species Can Survive in the Midst of Human Enterprise

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Win-Win Ecology: How the Earth's Species Can Survive in the Midst of Human Enterprise Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As humanity presses down inexorably on the natural world, people debate the extent to which we can save the Earth's millions of different species without sacrificing human economic welfare. But is this argument wise? Must the human and natural worlds be adversaries?

In this book, ecologist Michael Rosenzweig finds that ecological science actually rejects such polarization. Instead it suggests that, to be successful, conservation must discover how we can blend a rich natural world into the world of economic activity. This revolutionary, common ground between development and conservation is called reconciliation ecology: creating and maintaining species-friendly habitats in the very places where people live, work, or play.

The book offers many inspiring examples of the good results already achieved. The Nature Conservancy, for instance, has a cooperative agreement with the Department of Defense, with more than 200 conservation projects taking place on more than 170 bases in 41 states. In places such as Elgin Air Force Base, the human uses-testing munitions, profitable timbering and recreation--continue, but populations of several threatened species on the base, such as the long-leaf pine and the red-cockaded woodpecker, have been greatly improved. The Safe Harbor strategy of the FishandWildlife Service encourages private landowners to improve their property for endangered species, thus overcoming the unintended negative aspects of the Endangered Species Act. And Golden Gate Park, which began as a system of sand dunes, has become, through human effort, a world of ponds and shrubs, waterfowl and trees.

Rosenzweig shows that reconciliation ecology is the missing tool of conservation, the practical, scientifically based approach that, when added to the rest, will solve the problem of preserving Earth's species.

Synopsis:

A professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona offers guidelines to achieve practical improvements to the environment while still allowing for human progress. 29 illustrations.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-191) and index.

Synopsis:

As humanity presses down inexorably on the natural world, people debate the extent to which we can save the Earth's millions of different species without sacrificing human economic welfare. But is this argument wise? Must the human and natural worlds be adversaries?

In this book, ecologist Michael Rosenzweig finds that ecological science actually rejects such polarization. Instead it suggests that, to be successful, conservation must discover how we can blend a rich natural world into the world of economic activity. This revolutionary, common ground between development and conservation is called reconciliation ecology: creating and maintaining species-friendly habitats in the very places where people live, work, or play.

The book offers many inspiring examples of the good results already achieved. The Nature Conservancy, for instance, has a cooperative agreement with the Department of Defense, with more than 200 conservation projects taking place on more than 170 bases in 41 states. In places such as Elgin Air Force Base, the human uses-testing munitions, profitable timbering and recreation--continue, but populations of several threatened species on the base, such as the long-leaf pine and the red-cockaded woodpecker, have been greatly improved. The Safe Harbor strategy of the Fish and Wildlife Service encourages private landowners to improve their property for endangered species, thus overcoming the unintended negative aspects of the Endangered Species Act. And Golden Gate Park, which began as a system of sand dunes, has become, through human effort, a world of ponds and shrubs, waterfowl and trees.

Rosenzweig shows that reconciliation ecology is the missing tool of conservation, the practical, scientifically based approach that, when added to the rest, will solve the problem of preserving Earth's species.

About the Author

Michael L. Rosenzweig is Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Arizona and a Fellow of the Morris K. Udall Center for Public Policy.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195156041
Author:
Rosenzweig, Michael L.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
null, Michael L.
Location:
Oxford
Subject:
Environmental Science
Subject:
Ecology
Subject:
Nature conservation
Subject:
Human ecology
Subject:
Life Sciences - Ecology
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection - General
Subject:
Biodiversity conservation - Economic aspects
Subject:
Environmental Studies-Environment
Series Volume:
1211
Publication Date:
20030431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
42 halftones and line illus
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9.66x6.30x.90 in. 1.07 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Molecular
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Ecology
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
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Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » History

Win-Win Ecology: How the Earth's Species Can Survive in the Midst of Human Enterprise New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$56.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780195156041 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona offers guidelines to achieve practical improvements to the environment while still allowing for human progress. 29 illustrations.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-191) and index.
"Synopsis" by , As humanity presses down inexorably on the natural world, people debate the extent to which we can save the Earth's millions of different species without sacrificing human economic welfare. But is this argument wise? Must the human and natural worlds be adversaries?

In this book, ecologist Michael Rosenzweig finds that ecological science actually rejects such polarization. Instead it suggests that, to be successful, conservation must discover how we can blend a rich natural world into the world of economic activity. This revolutionary, common ground between development and conservation is called reconciliation ecology: creating and maintaining species-friendly habitats in the very places where people live, work, or play.

The book offers many inspiring examples of the good results already achieved. The Nature Conservancy, for instance, has a cooperative agreement with the Department of Defense, with more than 200 conservation projects taking place on more than 170 bases in 41 states. In places such as Elgin Air Force Base, the human uses-testing munitions, profitable timbering and recreation--continue, but populations of several threatened species on the base, such as the long-leaf pine and the red-cockaded woodpecker, have been greatly improved. The Safe Harbor strategy of the Fish and Wildlife Service encourages private landowners to improve their property for endangered species, thus overcoming the unintended negative aspects of the Endangered Species Act. And Golden Gate Park, which began as a system of sand dunes, has become, through human effort, a world of ponds and shrubs, waterfowl and trees.

Rosenzweig shows that reconciliation ecology is the missing tool of conservation, the practical, scientifically based approach that, when added to the rest, will solve the problem of preserving Earth's species.

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